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-   -   drills for rear foot control (http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=60774)

kgrove 05-16-2014 09:06 PM

drills for rear foot control
 
I ride almost exclusively goofy. I do some 180s to my switch (regular, stance), but I go back to goofy as soon as I can like a scared little girl. I want to change that and get better riding switch. Today while practicing switch, I figured out something interesting for me: when I ride switch, I have almost no weight on my rear foot and control the board almost entirely with my front foot. I honestly think I could take the rear binding off the board and it wouldn't impact my switch riding at all and many of my switch crashes start by burying the nose or going over the front.

Does anyone have any good drills to focus on the rear foot and board control from the rear foot (right foot for me)? Right now I'm just focusing on carving trying to concentrate on initiating the turn from my rear foot, but it really isn't doing much for me. Hopefully there is something more focused.

Jeff d 05-16-2014 09:16 PM

For fans of alliteration you can have Switch Saturdays (or Sundays) where everybody on your boat has to ride switch the whole time. In short you just have to make yourself do it. It's almost as bad as learning how to wakeboard again but once you do it long enough it will be almost as easy as riding regular. It took years for me (I've been wakeboarding for 20 years) but something interesting happened. I got to a point where I was learning how to jump all over again switch and I actually started jumping higher switch than regular. I then applied the technique I learned riding switch to my regular jumps and those got higher too.

So, I'm not aware of any shortcuts. Go out with some freinds who you don't need to impress and ride switch the whole time. Repeat that until you feel comfortable.

Here's some switch air for you:
http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/...1&d=1398948969

Jeff d 05-16-2014 09:31 PM

BTW I have a pretty decent excuse for sucking at switch for years. I literally had the first HyperLite board made:
http://www.wakeworld.com/MB/Discus/m...921/459351.jpg
The brand was actually H.O. and the model was the HyperLite. Later they started branding all of their boards as HyperLite. It had 3 big surfboard fins on the back and didn't ride switch very well at all. You kids with your symmetric boards don't know how good you have it!

I remember the first symmetric board coming out and it was the WakeTech 69. I wanted it so bad but I couldn't imagine my parents reaction to me owning a board called the "69" when I was like 15 years old. I would have gone from a Ho to a 69 I guess.

mitchelmilitiapres 05-17-2014 10:41 AM

I like your Switch Saturdays or Sundays idea! I imagine that can really help grow your riding.
I've always been an advocate of getting up and riding switch as the boat is getting up to speed. Just like with anything else repetition and time on the water are the only things that really make you better and help you develop the muscle memory to do whatever you have in mind.

Astepatatime 05-17-2014 01:38 PM

Interesting.

I do agree with the others, it's mostly practice and time. A few things they did while I was at the Boarding School to help with riding switch

1. Made whole sets switch, including getting up switch (not get up normal and surface 180)
2. Changed the wake. We actually spent quite a bit of time wakeboarding on the Prostar, to get rid of the intimidating wake when riding switch. If you don't have a ski boat available, just get rid of ballast, change speed, etc, so you get rid of the scary part and can focus on technique.
3. Over-Emphasized basic fundamentals: hip positions, handle/arm positions, etc. This will change your balance point
4. Carving drills - either inside the wake our outside. Lot of carving/edging drills, getting progressively more aggressive. To really edge, you have to get your foot balance

And if you really wanted to get more extreme, remove some of your fins - certainly the center fin, others if you can. Or use a cable park board. When the board is loose, you have to learn technique to control it.

AlbertaSurfer 05-17-2014 02:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jeff d (Post 1044971)
BTW I have a pretty decent excuse for sucking at switch for years. I literally had the first HyperLite board made:
http://www.wakeworld.com/MB/Discus/m...921/459351.jpg
The brand was actually H.O. and the model was the HyperLite. Later they started branding all of their boards as HyperLite. It had 3 big surfboard fins on the back and didn't ride switch very well at all. You kids with your symmetric boards don't know how good you have it!

I remember the first symmetric board coming out and it was the WakeTech 69. I wanted it so bad but I couldn't imagine my parents reaction to me owning a board called the "69" when I was like 15 years old. I would have gone from a Ho to a 69 I guess.

Such a sick board! I had one of those too, and the Eric Perez one with the face on the bottom. I also remember staring at the Flight 69 wishing I had the cash for that. The white, red and orange one Byerly and Gator used to ride was so awesome.


As for riding switch. I agree with the others, it just takes doing it to learn. Next time you're out, switch around, and consciously relax and stand up. It always feels awkward at first, but just stand up straight and cruise between your edges in slow turns. Get a patient boat driver and friends too, don't worry about giving up because you think you're annoying people. It just takes practice

73blue 05-17-2014 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AlbertaSurfer (Post 1045084)
Such a sick board! I had one of those too, and the Eric Perez one with the face on the bottom. I also remember staring at the Flight 69 wishing I had the cash for that. The white, red and orange one Byerly and Gator used to ride was so awesome.


As for riding switch. I agree with the others, it just takes doing it to learn. Next time you're out, switch around, and consciously relax and stand up. It always feels awkward at first, but just stand up straight and cruise between your edges in slow turns. Get a patient boat driver and friends too, don't worry about giving up because you think you're annoying people. It just takes practice

Oh, the memories. We definitely had the Perez model. I remember learning to jump and about every other time the board would come off your feet. Great times, and great crashes.

To build on what other posters have said as far as switch riding, I always preferred working on it on weekday afternoons with just 1-2 people. That way there wasnt a line of people waiting to ride. The water was normally smoother as well. One thing that helped me as i was learning to jump switch was that I would pop little 180s and land regular. It was actually easier to land the 180 than a regular jump, and that took the scary landing out of it til I was more comfortable and balanced jumping switch.

Jeff d 05-17-2014 03:32 PM

I'm not sure how to explain it in words but your observation about how you initially feel more comfortable with almost all of your weight forward when switch is a good one. That's what ultimately improved my regular jumps. When learning to ride regular I think everyone tends to put almost all of their weight on their rear foot. When you start trying to jump the wake that tends to cause you to absorb a lot of the energy of the wake and you get less air. Your weight is towards the rear of the board so when the front of the board hits the wake it tends to use the energy to rotate your body back.

Just like you, when I started riding switch a lot, I was more comfortable with my weight forward. Then when I started jumping the wake was just launching me vertical. Way more natural "pop" than I ever had experienced on my regular jumps in the past. From there I started shifting my weight forward on my regular jumps too and those got much higher as well. Now I always tell people lean forward and try to "stomp" the wake with your front foot. If your leg is straight and your weight is forward the wake will push you straight up.

damaged442 05-19-2014 07:48 AM

It's all about time. You just need to ride switch to improve at it. The more time you ride, the more improvements you will see. I agree it is awkward at first, but hang in there.

GoneBoatN 05-19-2014 09:25 AM

I agree on the 100% switch session riding, or at lease see below on the 4-minute drill.

I also go to the cable park. I find myself riding switch much more there for a few reasons: 1) its easier at the cable park, 2) I tire out my normal side so I extend my session by switch riding, 3) I can do a 180 off the kicker because I go into it switch and I come out of it automatically without even having to thing about it (I only tried this once behind the boat and face planted - I have to go back to it). There have been days where I do 100% switch at the cable park.

Practice makes perfect.

Also (the 4-minute drill):
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hzJJwagidLc

IMO, body position will ultimately determine the proper weighting of front vs back. I think that feeling of weighting the front foot more when riding switch is more of a feeling of the tenseness you are holding in the front foot - I have the same natural tendency to do the same! It sucks to be heavily dominate footed to one side wrt wakeboarding, skiing, etc.


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