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-   -   Second Battery in parallel (http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=60770)

wakeboardhead84 05-16-2014 06:57 PM

Second Battery in parallel
 
Does anyone have batteries connected in parallel on a closed bow prostar 190? I have to add a second battery for my amplifier but don't have room for it in the stern behind the bench seat. I think my only option is to put it in the bow. Can I run the connection wires for the batteries that far?

j.mccreight@hotmail.com 05-16-2014 08:06 PM

I don't see any problems with having the batteries in different locations as long as you use properly sized cables for the length of run that is needed.

MLA 05-16-2014 08:35 PM

Why do you have to add a battery in parallel to the main cranking for the amp?

Cloaked 05-16-2014 08:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wakeboardhead84 (Post 1044909)
Does anyone have batteries connected in parallel on a closed bow prostar 190? I have to add a second battery for my amplifier but don't have room for it in the stern behind the bench seat. I think my only option is to put it in the bow. Can I run the connection wires for the batteries that far?

There are a ton of pictures and write-ups on the forum about this very thing... plenty of room up under the closed deck for two batteries and an amp unless you're wanting to store a wheel barrow under there...

I can't be comfortable with a battery and a fuel cell in the same confined space. I moved everything up front (except for the fuel cell).

$0.02

.

wakeboardhead84 05-17-2014 01:44 AM

I wasn't positive I needed the second battery but from what I have read it's not a good idea to have the amp powered by my 1 cranking battery.

MLA 05-17-2014 08:16 AM

If you wire that 2nd battery to the original battery in parallel, they become one larger battery. So at the end of the day, your amp would still be running off your one cranking battery.

I am a HUGE fan of having 2 batteries in a boat, but not wired together, but rather as separate banks isolated by a manual switch, etc.

The only thing "wrong", if one wants to use that term, with having a stereo draw off the one cranking battery, is it limits your play time while at anchor. Other then that, there is nothing electrically wrong with it. A dual battery setup simply allows us to keep a battery in reserve, and play the tunes while the engine is off.

Sorry for the added info, I realize its not actually answering your original question.

Cloaked 05-17-2014 03:32 PM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by wakeboardhead84 (Post 1045020)
I wasn't positive I needed the second battery but from what I have read it's not a good idea to have the amp powered by my 1 cranking battery.

Put a second battery in the machine. Can't go wrong. Wire them parallel.. no big deal and that is typically how the setup goes. The isolation switch will separate the banks when you turn the ignition off or to accessory. You will not be drawing anything from the start battery (while in accessory position) when you do the setup correctly.

When you start the engine, the isolation switch will fail closed thus charging both batteries during operation. When you go to accessory (for the tunes) the isolation switch will fail open and separate the banks. Exactly what you want.

Install two. Done deal and no second guessing when you are on the water.

Move the rear battery up front away from the fuel cell and add a second under the deck on up front. You add 3.5' of cable to the hot and the ground (compared to the original install). No big deal. I did re-cable my machine and started with new cable runs. I also upgraded the alternator and lead cable from it to the starter.

Easy setup.

Tristarboarder 05-17-2014 04:06 PM

^ I see the obvious Perko, but what is the brand/make/model of the battery isolator on the bottom there? I think I need one right? currently I have two batteries (1 cranking, 1 deep cycle) and 1 perko.

Cloaked 05-17-2014 06:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tristarboarder (Post 1045099)
^ I see the obvious Perko, but what is the brand/make/model of the battery isolator on the bottom there? I think I need one right? currently I have two batteries (1 cranking, 1 deep cycle) and 1 perko.

Blue Seas isolator. If I were to do this again, I'd forgo the Perko. It's an added step (at the end of the process) that is not necessary. Go back and read about Diesel's setup and the lone isolation switch wired to the ignition of which he used. That is truly all one needs, but it's each to their own...

Your Perko is doing what you tell it to do in a manual selection manner (if I am not mistaken). The isolation switch will work according to your ignition switch commands if you wire it properly, no need for the Perko. The isolation will open and close as directed by 'on' and 'accessory' positions of the ignition switch.

The Perko I have basically over rides the isolation with an 'off' position for disconnecting both batteries (I use battery monitors , one for each battery in the off position), the next position is 'on' for obvious operations, and thirdly (probably the only benefit of the Perko) is to combine both batteries in some scenario where both batteries may need to be used in parallel for cranking. Otherwise, the single isolation switch will work fine.

I think the important underlying aspect of the dual battery system is to also upgrade the alternator to something of 100 amps so the alternator can work easier while maintaining two batteries. That will give you the life expectancy of the alternator in lieu of it (at 50 amps) having to work overtime on two batteries; also the need to put in a heavier alternator cable to starter. It's an endless money pit...

.

Jeff d 05-17-2014 06:31 PM

People run a single or even two amps with one battery all the time. Unless you're the type to sit with the engine off and play the radio for hours then you don't necessarily need a second battery. A regular cranking battery isn't ideal but will be ok as long as you don't "deep cycle" it too often. A "dual purpose" marine battery is an ok compromise for single battery setups. The dual purpose battery will be more tolerant of deep cycles than a normal cranking battery and offer more cranking amps than a comparable deep cycle battery.

I have had a 900 watt rms amp in my boat for 3 seasons now and have never once drained my dual purpose group 31 battery even after playing the radio with the engine off for a couple of hours.

If you want to play it safe just get one of these jump packs:
http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B000JFJLP6

You'll need a bigger one like that for a V8 so don't go get the $50 ones. The nice thing about them is that they can be used for your tow vehicle or to assist other boaters. The bad thing is that you have to remember to move it back into the boat if you take it out.


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