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-   -   Tips on Wet sanding (http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=55519)

andersonmc 06-27-2013 01:59 PM

Tips on Wet sanding
 
Anyone have some tips or links to forums that cover this. Trying to remove oxidation.

sam196370 06-27-2013 02:20 PM

Prepare for a lot of work.....I started with 600 grit and went to 1500, if you're going to do it right take decals off and get new ones. Get spray bottle and do small areas at a time. Be sure not to use traditional sandpaper, doesn't work as well with water.

Although the process is VERY labor intensive you don't need experience; a lot easier than wet sanding a car.

BrianM 06-27-2013 03:16 PM

Straight back and forth strokes not circular. Do first grit one direction then do the next grit perpendicular. This makes it much easier to see when you have removed all of the scratches from the previous grit.

How bad is the oxidation? Some 3M Super Duty Compound on a high quality wool pad with a rotary polisher can remove some nasty oxidation with a couple of passes.

Start with the least aggressive method possible and work up from there if necessary.

skongolf 06-27-2013 03:31 PM

When I did mine on my black x30 i was terrified when I saw what it looked like but when you hit it with the compound your worries go out the door. It will look awesome when done. The thing with mine was after 2 years the oxidation is back, just not as bad. I hit it with compound now and it looks OK but nothing like wetsanding. I agree with hitting it with a good compound and buffer first and see what it looks like.

andersonmc 06-27-2013 07:07 PM

My oxidation is mild so I think my DA will take it out with the right compound and pad. I do have a few scratches though that need to be sanded out.

jk13 06-27-2013 07:40 PM

My red boat was bad when I bought it. Compound wouldn't do a thing on mine.

I wet sanded and the quickest I found was to put on an old pair of swim trunks and have my son hold the garden hose above where I was sanding to keep the paper from clogging up. I also ended up wearing thick rubber gloves because my well water is darn cold.

Like Sam I also sanded up to 1500 and it polished out no problem.

BamaCraft 06-27-2013 09:46 PM

I have over 20 years as a cutom painter and my dad owned a custom paint shop so hear me out. You most likely do not need to sand. You definitely do not need to use a DA! I didnt sand my old 92 PS when i bought it and you could read a newspaper in it when i got done. Use ONLY 3M polishing products. Others have too many fillers and will leave your job looking crappy in a few weeks. You will need 4 stages(wool pad + compound, low cut wool pad + imperial, and then waffle pad + Perfect It finishing glaze then wax). Probably 6 if you sand. You can get different cut wool pads too which should further reduce need To sand. Go to a local automotive paint & body supply store and get you some 3M compound, 3M imperial glaze and some perfect it finishing glaze, buffing pad and a pack of waffle pads. They should help you with what you need....maybe a Velcro pad for your buffer too. Makita makes a great variable speed buffer if you need one. Cover the interior, buff in shade, and i would mask off rub rail etc so no compound can get in crevaces. Id even throw sheets over rails on trailer it will make life easier when cleaning.

Feel free to pm me any questions.

willg 06-27-2013 11:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BamaCraft (Post 951875)
I have over 20 years as a cutom painter and my dad owned a custom paint shop so hear me out. You most likely do not need to sand. You definitely do not need to use a DA! I didnt sand my old 92 PS when i bought it and you could read a newspaper in it when i got done. Use ONLY 3M polishing products. Others have too many fillers and will leave your job looking crappy in a few weeks. You will need 4 stages(wool pad + compound, low cut wool pad + imperial, and then waffle pad + Perfect It finishing glaze then wax). Probably 6 if you sand. You can get different cut wool pads too which should further reduce need To sand. Go to a local automotive paint & body supply store and get you some 3M compound, 3M imperial glaze and some perfect it finishing glaze, buffing pad and a pack of waffle pads. They should help you with what you need....maybe a Velcro pad for your buffer too. Makita makes a great variable speed buffer if you need one. Cover the interior, buff in shade, and i would mask off rub rail etc so no compound can get in crevaces. Id even throw sheets over rails on trailer it will make life easier when cleaning.

Feel free to pm me any questions.


I did this too. MUCHHHH easier than wet sanding.

andersonmc 06-28-2013 02:36 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BamaCraft (Post 951875)
I have over 20 years as a cutom painter and my dad owned a custom paint shop so hear me out. You most likely do not need to sand. You definitely do not need to use a DA! I didnt sand my old 92 PS when i bought it and you could read a newspaper in it when i got done. Use ONLY 3M polishing products. Others have too many fillers and will leave your job looking crappy in a few weeks. You will need 4 stages(wool pad + compound, low cut wool pad + imperial, and then waffle pad + Perfect It finishing glaze then wax). Probably 6 if you sand. You can get different cut wool pads too which should further reduce need To sand. Go to a local automotive paint & body supply store and get you some 3M compound, 3M imperial glaze and some perfect it finishing glaze, buffing pad and a pack of waffle pads. They should help you with what you need....maybe a Velcro pad for your buffer too. Makita makes a great variable speed buffer if you need one. Cover the interior, buff in shade, and i would mask off rub rail etc so no compound can get in crevaces. Id even throw sheets over rails on trailer it will make life easier when cleaning.

Feel free to pm me any questions.

How come you said don't use da polisher? I've had great success with it.

BamaCraft 06-30-2013 04:08 PM

A DA in the automotive world is a Disc Action sander. I took that as wanting to use with ultra fine wet sanding. Ive seen that before and doesnt turn out so well. We call what you refer to as DA posher as an orbital buffer. I use one frequently too. Great to use with liquid wax but for compounding etc.. A variable speed buffer is the only way to go.


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