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-   -   Cold nights and engine blocks (http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=2650)

Medicine Laker 05-01-2005 11:19 PM

Cold nights and engine blocks
 
I live in the north and like to get my boat in for some early season skiing. I have been warned previously about the possibility of having the water freeze in the engine block and and it cracking. How cold does it really need to get before this is a concern? Just because it gets down to 32 for an hour overnight should not be a problem, but where is the line?

Leroy 05-01-2005 11:30 PM

No one can answer for sure, keep in mind the temperature also varies by probably +/- 3 or 4 degrees depending on where the boat is located.


I would play it safe, if you make a mistake it is at least $5k mistake. It's easy to drain the water out and not more than a 10 minute job.

Bongo 05-02-2005 12:24 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Medicine Laker
How cold does it really need to get before this is a concern? Just because it gets down to 32 for an hour overnight should not be a problem, but where is the line?

Yea, I've thought about this question a few times. My rationale: If the boat is on the water, the lake will act as a 'heat island' and not get as cold as the air over land. However, it'll also be at the low point, so offset some by the cooler air gravitating toward the low spot. When temps dip slightly below freezing - especially if was a (reasonably) warm day - I have no concerns. Beyond that, I've occasionally taken my chances.

If you are concerned, you may want to try a small light bulb. An incandescent light bulb is basically an electric heater that emits a small bit of light energy. Placing a well-protected light (i.e. shop light, or similar) under the engine will certainly keep it warm enough on most spring nights in most locations. Notice the wiggle words, such that I didn't give a definitive answer? ;-)

Bongo

JEREMY79 05-02-2005 12:30 AM

Dont forget that metal temp (block is metal) is typically 10-15 degrees colder than the air. I know this because of painting metal. Stupid stuff that stays in my head.

erkoehler 05-02-2005 12:55 AM

I wouldn't take the chance. Either drain the block, or pull the boat out of the lake and store it indoors.

To me, the 15 minutes it may take to do either of those things is not worth the 5k in possible damage.

AirJunky 05-02-2005 01:06 AM

These inboards are a lot easier to drain than an outboard or I/O. With petcocks on the side of your block, a pair of hoses connecting the exhaust manifolds, and a couple of radiator flush Ts in your heater & shower hoses, bump start the motor once & the water in the motor is gone in less than 3 minutes.
I have been keeping my 205 outside for 5 years & I live less than an hour from the Canadian border. Never had a problem..... knock on wood. :toast:

Tom Jones 05-04-2005 07:27 AM

I agree, you have to remember also that the motor box has insulation around it and if the boat has been run the day before the temp. drops it will be fine even if it gets quite a bit below freezing. Just for piece if mind I do put a trouble light inside the motor box occassinally when it gets more than a couple of degrees below freezing. I do this if the boat has not been run that day.

wiltok 05-04-2005 11:03 AM

I have been told (and this makes sense) that if the boat is stored on a lift over the water - you will be less affected by the cold. The heat is released from the lake and keeps tempuratures warmer around the boat (unless of course the water is frozen :). The warmer the water the better - obviously in the fall it would be like having a huge heater under the boat. However, the effect still exists in the winter. Just my opinion though - don't sue me if you get your block cracked!!

east tx skier 05-04-2005 11:07 AM

Regardless of where you store it, I'd say that draining it and spining the motor with the kill switch removed for a second will be your best bet. If you don't, to an extent depending on where it's stored, you're rolling the dice.

sizzler 05-04-2005 11:10 AM

[quote=Tom Jones]I agree, you have to remember also that the motor box has insulation around it and if the boat has been run the day before the temp. drops it will be fine even if it gets quite a bit below freezing. Just for piece if mind I do put a trouble light inside the motor box occassinally when it gets more than a couple of degrees below freezing. I do this if the boat has not been run that day.[/QUOTE

tom jones.....does this happen a lot???

"ITS NOT UNUSUAL"

sorry couldnt resist


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