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View Full Version : Flat Tire Gets Ugly


stumbledog
06-17-2006, 03:11 AM
I got home from work at approx. 2:00am, and found my '93 prostar leaning to one side in that garage. Yep, flat tire (thank God I did not leave it in the side yard like the wife wanted me too. I would have never got it jacked up).

In the process, and it sure was a process, of getting the tire off, I snapped off one of the studs off. Can I replace the broken stud? Or where would I find a new hub?

Tennesseeski
06-17-2006, 04:17 AM
I feel bad for you, but like you said, it coulda been worse. Never had a broken stud on a trailer, but several on cars/trucks. I would guess it is the same though. You can replace just the broken stud if you want.If only one stud is broken, I would put the wheel back on once the tire is repaired and take it to a wheel/tire place and have them replace the stud. Doesn't cost much. If you wanted to do it yourself you can, but it has been my findings that this is one job I was better off paying someone else to do for me. All you/they should have to do is knock the old stud out the back side of the hub and put a new one in.TRICK is getting the old one out sometimes is not easy :noface: !!!

kent
06-17-2006, 07:28 AM
I agree better off reinstall repaired tire & take it to the shop for the stud repair. It will probably take you the majority of the day to fix it and the shop a 1/2hr. Then you're back on the water.
Good luck!!

Cloaked
06-17-2006, 07:36 AM
As a point of reference, here's a place I use that is right near me. You may find a closer supplier but this will allow you something to compare.

http://www.luckyb.com/

bigmac
06-17-2006, 07:57 AM
It wouldn't necessarily be that big a deal to pull the hub, drive the broken stud out and pound in a new one - an air hammer might be necessary assuming you don't have a press. Those studs are available at auto stores, even our little hardware store sells 'em. However, you have to wonder why the stud broke. The most common reason would be that they weren't torqued down properly and/or loosened, so you'd wonder if the other studs had been damaged or weakened by the same process. Consequently, I'd strongly consider replacing the others on that side too. Then I'd pay close attention to re-torquing all of the studs on both sides. And it would be important to re-torque them after driving a few miles too. I'm not sure of the torque specs on your trailer, but typically they're between 90-120 ft-lbs, which is out of reach of the typical homeowner's standard torque wrench, which usually only goes up to 70 ft-lbs. - another reason to maybe have it done at the tire store. Personally, I'm a fan of applying a touch of Never-Sieze to the stud threads before torquing them down.

rodltg2
06-17-2006, 10:23 AM
i had a simalar situation only a bit worse. got a flat some where on the mojave desert in the way back from lake havasu. when taking the wheel off three studs would just spin. we took the whole assemble off and had some shady mechanic knock out the old studs..
at the time we were broke college students and couldnt afford the fix after a long week of spring break. i thought we going to have to get job in mojave to pay the mechanic...

Ric
06-17-2006, 10:29 AM
I think you can get a new hub for around $30 and then keep your old on e as a spare
that will give you a chance to change out your bearings if they havent been done in awhile. (do the other side bearings too)

pilot02
06-17-2006, 11:19 AM
Stud replacement is simple. drive the old one out, match the base for the new one and then use an extra "acorn nut" reversed so that the flat side is against the hub and tighten the nut to pull the stud into the hub. Takes all of 5 mins. An impact wrench will make it easier but not necessary and there's no need to remove the hub from the trailer.

Ric
06-17-2006, 12:28 PM
i had a simalar situation only a bit worse. got a flat some where on the mojave desert in the way back from lake havasu. when taking the wheel off three studs would just spin. we took the whole assemble off and had some shady mechanic knock out the old studs..
at the time we were broke college students and couldnt afford the fix after a long week of spring break. i thought we going to have to get job in mojave to pay the mechanic...
it is a great country when broke college students are towing a ski boat to Havasu for some much needed R&R

bigmac
06-17-2006, 12:31 PM
it is a great country when broke college students are towing a ski boat to Havasu for some much needed R&R

Heh..cogent observation. Is this a great country, or what? :D

Ric
06-17-2006, 12:33 PM
Heh..cogent observation. Is this a great country, or what? :D
Amedica... vaaat I countdry

TMCNo1
06-17-2006, 02:39 PM
Some hubs come with screw in allen head studs on the rotor/hub assembly for disc brakes, like the UFP ones on our trailer. Look on the back side of the hub and see if they have a allen head stud. Moroso Speed Parts makes these studs and you can also find them at your local nut/bolt/fastener supply house, but be sure they are grade 8. Be sure to buy a couple extra or even a complete set just in case you break another one. It's a simple task to change out in the driveway if you have a allen wrench socket and a extension for the ratchet.

rodltg2
06-17-2006, 02:40 PM
it is a great country when broke college students are towing a ski boat to Havasu for some much needed R&R


it was my parents boat really, i borrowed it ..

TMCNo1
06-17-2006, 02:52 PM
Stud replacement is simple. drive the old one out, match the base for the new one and then use an extra "acorn nut" reversed so that the flat side is against the hub and tighten the nut to pull the stud into the hub. Takes all of 5 mins. An impact wrench will make it easier but not necessary and there's no need to remove the hub from the trailer.

You may also have to take one of the good ones to the supply house to get a exact replacement, so, take a old lug nut and put it on a few turns on the end of one of the good ones to drive it out, so you won't damage the threads.

stumbledog
06-19-2006, 04:07 PM
You may also have to take one of the good ones to the supply house to get a exact replacement, so, take a old lug nut and put it on a few turns on the end of one of the good ones to drive it out, so you won't damage the threads.

What is the easiest way to get the hub off?

stumbledog
06-19-2006, 04:33 PM
Bump..............

Cloaked
06-19-2006, 05:49 PM
It should tap right off with a hammer or a block of wood / hammer.

Remove the hub cap (or bearing buddy if it has one), remove the cotter pin (hidden in a well of grease), back off the spindle nut, and the hub should pull right off.

stumbledog
06-19-2006, 06:06 PM
It should tap right off with a hammer or a block of wood / hammer.

Remove the hub cap (or bearing buddy if it has one), remove the cotter pin (hidden in a well of grease), back off the spindle nut, and the hub should pull right off.

I need to pull all that to change a broken stud?

TMCNo1
06-19-2006, 08:35 PM
Sorry, double post!

TMCNo1
06-19-2006, 08:37 PM
I need to pull all that to change a broken stud?


No, just take a big punch and hammer the broken stud out from the outside if its a pull in type stud, pull the new stud back into the hub from the backside with a couple old style lug nuts to seat the stud into the hub. Again, check from the back side to see if you have the pull in studs or the screw in allen head studs.

Cloaked
06-19-2006, 08:51 PM
I need to pull all that to change a broken stud?If you do get to this point of removal, it is very simple and painless. Takes all of about 2 minutes or less...

You can change the stud with the hub on the axle.

Beware of seized stud or possibly even tack welded (or actually spot welded through automated assembly) (just a thought to be aware of while pounding away).

stumbledog
06-19-2006, 10:38 PM
No, just take a big punch and hammer the broken stud out from the outside if its a pull in type stud, pull the new stud back into the hub from the backside with a couple old style lug nuts to seat the stud into the hub. Again, check from the back side to see if you have the pull in studs or the screw in allen head studs.

I will have to pull the spare off in the morning and take a good look at it. I could swear that there is no access from behind the hub to get at the rear of the studs. Seems to me the brake assembly and drum are in the way???

TMCNo1
06-19-2006, 10:58 PM
I will have to pull the spare off in the morning and take a good look at it. I could swear that there is no access from behind the hub to get at the rear of the studs. Seems to me the brake assembly and drum are in the way???


So, you have drum brakes, wish you had told us that to start with, then you will have to take off the hub, because your backing plate, wheel cylinder and brake shoes are in the way. That's all I got!

stumbledog
06-19-2006, 11:15 PM
So, you have drum brakes, wish you had told us that to start with, then you will have to take off the hub, because your backing plate, wheel cylinder and brake shoes are in the way. That's all I got!

Sorry, it was 2am when I started the wheel change and when I posted my question. Still not exactly sure what the whole assembly looked like. I was more concerned with getting things so we could trailer the boat later that morning. With only one stud broke, I saw no reason to waste a beautiful day trying to figure it out.

I really think I should check out the other wheel and see how the lug nuts come off and what condition the valve stem is in on that tire. Also check both sets of bearings. I am pretty confident this is done much easier in the garage than on the side of the road.

stumbledog
06-22-2006, 04:52 PM
I finally pulled the hub off today, and dropped it off at the shop around the corner to change out all the studs. He called me back and said he was having trouble finding them, and would no thave them until Saturday morning.

I would have thought the NAPA dealer would have them. Are they an odd ball size? It is a '93.

TMCNo1
06-22-2006, 05:09 PM
Sorry, but something sounds fishy here. Most any auto parts store should have them in stock or could get them delivered the next day from a distribution warehouse. Tire and wheel shops would also have quick access to suppliers as they are usually the ones who are most confronted with broken lug nut studs. If and when you get them installed, be sure the mechanic has ordered you some extras as spares for any possible broken studs.
Does anyone in your area build utility trailers or sell trailers, do you have a Camper/RV store, Northern Tool or a Fastener store?

milkmania
06-22-2006, 05:27 PM
Sorry, it was 2am when I started the wheel change and when I posted my question. Still not exactly sure what the whole assembly looked like. I was more concerned with getting things so we could trailer the boat later that morning. With only one stud broke, I saw no reason to waste a beautiful day trying to figure it out.

I really think I should check out the other wheel and see how the lug nuts come off and what condition the valve stem is in on that tire. Also check both sets of bearings. I am pretty confident this is done much easier in the garage than on the side of the road.

you guys are making this waaaay too easy on me

TMCNo1
06-22-2006, 05:37 PM
you guys are making this waaaay too easy on me



Milk, you ain't missed much, as you can tell!

stumbledog
06-22-2006, 07:27 PM
you guys are making this waaaay too easy on me


Did I miss something?