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View Full Version : oil used for bearings/hubs in 02' x-30 trailer.


garyh
05-25-2006, 03:39 PM
I didnt see this thread anywhere on the site nor did I find a FAQ link; however,
I have an 02 x30 and Im changing the oil and break fluid in the trailer. I took the wheel off and then the two allen set screws and drained the fluid I initially thought that it took grease but when I drained this fluid it looked more like milkey motor oil as if water had gotten into the bearings or hub. The hub has a site glass on it, I'm wandering what kind of oil does this take and do you just pour it in? if so how much? to the top or just half way? any suggestions please let me know this is my first inboard and Im just getting familiar with everything.
Thx, Gary.

vogelm1
05-25-2006, 07:32 PM
I've got a little newer trailer ('05) but it does have the oil bath hubs. It's a little tougher to find, but it takes 50W motor oil. Haven't had much luck finding at Wal-Mart, etc, had to go to an auto parts store. My hubs have lettering molded into the sight window...you're supposed to fill up to the lettering, which amounts to between half and three-quarters full. If the oil is 'milky' you've definitely got water mixed with it. Good thing you're changing. Probably did this already, but might wanna check the bearing seals on back of hubs and replace. Good luck -

vogelm1
05-25-2006, 11:26 PM
garyh - just a bump for ya in case you didn't see yet...

oxmach
05-26-2006, 09:30 AM
I just did mine last weekend. The trailer manual, available through the downloads section on this site, says 80- 90 weight oil. You should find it in the gear oil section of your auto parts store. I found some 85W and put that in.

Davo
05-26-2006, 10:16 AM
For what it's worth, my neighbor is a pro bass fisherman and he's been around boats/trailers for a long, long time...he suggested 50 weight motor oil in the bath hubs.

JimN
05-26-2006, 11:25 AM
garyh- if you have water in the oil, you need to check or replace the seals. The condition of the bearings will depend on how long the water has been in there and how much it has been towed. Bearing/spindle failure at highway speed is a really bad thing.

Davo
05-31-2006, 11:58 AM
I checked my hub oil last weekend and was pleasantly surprised to see it still looked good.

One question though - how hard is it to change the seal and where is located?

vogelm1
05-31-2006, 01:24 PM
I checked my hub oil last weekend and was pleasantly surprised to see it still looked good.

One question though - how hard is it to change the seal and where is located?

Davo - not too bad if you're handy with basic tools. I'll assume you haven't taken a hub apart before, so apologize it too detailed. You'll need to take off the tire; then drain the hub oil; pull (or in my case, unscrew) the oil cap off the outside of the hub; you'll now see a cotter key, a nut locking plate, and nut. Remove these and gently pull the hub assembly off the axle. The inner and outer bearings will stay in the hub and come out together. The outer bearing can be lifted out with your fingers - flip the hub over and you'll see the rubber seal that keeps water out of our hub. This can carefully be pryed out with a large screw driver (or a seal puller designed for this purpose). The inner bearing is located under the seal. Reverse the process to put back together.

New seals can be purchased at your local automotive parts store. There should be a number stamped on the seal they can cross reference. Worst case is they can measure the O.D. and I.D. and set you up. After you put the inner bearing back in, you'll need to tap the new seal into the hub bore. A large socket or piece of pipe just slightly smaller than the diameter of the seal works well. Tap the seal into place being certain you're "square" with the bore. I've seen people just tap around the outside edge of the seal with a hammer until it's seated, but you risk warping the seal or damaging it.

When re-assembling the hub, you are supposed to torque the wheel bearing nut to spec...but I just tighten it snug with a large adjustable wrench while spinning the hub. Once you tighten the nut enough that you can still turn the hub, but feel a fair amount of resistance, back off the nut with the wrench and finger tighten the nut. This will place the proper amount of pre-load on the bearings. Continue assembly and add oil - you're done! Good luck.

Davo
05-31-2006, 01:51 PM
Thanks, vogelm1...no I haven't taken one apart yet. So, there's just one seal per hub?

Thanks again!

vogelm1
05-31-2006, 04:15 PM
Thanks, vogelm1...no I haven't taken one apart yet. So, there's just one seal per hub?

Thanks again!

Correct, one seal per hub, always located on the inboard side of the hub. They are fairly inexpensive too...last time I did mine a pair of seals ran around $12. Couple a bucks for the 50W oil and you're good to go. Cheap insurance and worth doing when needed...I always feel for the guy pulled off the highway with his boat waiting for the tow truck.