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Diesel
05-23-2006, 12:42 PM
At the end of last season I sold my Duarmax due to the inceasing cost of diesel, poor fuel mileage, and an overheating problem GM cannot seem to fix. As a result we used my wife's Yukon to tow the boat at the end of the season. While I was very impressed with the 5.3's power and the running gear I was not impressed with the load handling ability of the factory rear coil springs. Her truck has a factory tow package and the highest CGVW rating of the Yukon trucks yet I did not feel the springs were up to the task. Here is a pic of it last year and you can see the squating rear end with the boat attached.

http://img359.imageshack.us/img359/5176/dsc00923r1ww.jpg

Here is the after I fixed the problem for comparison. (details to follow)

http://img387.imageshack.us/img387/9824/dsc02142r0js.jpg

rodltg2
05-23-2006, 12:44 PM
looks like the yukon and boat match well at least..

DooSPX
05-23-2006, 12:47 PM
details man, details

Diesel
05-23-2006, 01:08 PM
So over the winter I started looking at my options. First I found a helper air bellows mfg by AirLift called the Air Lift 1000. Basically you place these inside your existing coil springs and they expand as preassure is added to help with the load. Here is a pic....

http://www.airliftcompany.com/images/al1000kit.jpg

I have seen these used in the past and was not impressed with thier performance or durability so I passed.

Then I decided to look at completely replacing the coil spring with an air spring assembly. After some research I discovered H2 Hummers have an optional air-ride suspension system. This was perfect since the H2 is based on the Yukon platform and shares almost identical suspension components. After a long search on Ebay I scored a brand new pair of Hummer H2 air springs for $100.

Once I got the coils springs out of the truck and looked at the mounting surfaces, it turns out the Hummer air bags are almost a direct replacement for the Yukon/XL coil springs.

The upper coil bucket has a series of cut outs which were designed to hold the Hummer air bag. Here is a pic of the upper coil bucket and the cut out slots.

http://img125.imageshack.us/img125/9763/dsc01130r4bn.jpg

The Hummer air bag has tabs which just slide into the cutouts and you turn it clockwise unti it locks in place. Here is the bag mounted in the upper coil bucket.

http://img125.imageshack.us/img125/986/dsc02046r1md.jpg

Diesel
05-23-2006, 01:16 PM
The factory lower mounting coil bucket (axle side) looks like this.

http://img125.imageshack.us/img125/4119/dsc01125r4fh.jpg

The Hummer air bags came with a 2.5" centering puck which holds them in place on the lower mount. As a result I had to weld a 14mm nut to axle tube so the centering puck could be bolted over the existing coil bucket. Here is a pic of the welded nut.

http://img155.imageshack.us/img155/1839/dsc02048r2zr.jpg

Now at this point the bags can be placed over the puck and on to the factory axle coil bucket and you are done with mounting the bags...................unless you want to improve the ride a bit. (details to follow). :D

bigmac
05-23-2006, 01:26 PM
My opinion: tow vehicle squat is a function of frame geometry and bad weight distribution, not inadequate springs. IMHO the better (and cheaper/easier) solution is to improve the frame geometry with a weight distributing hitch. Stiffer rear springs make the vehicle look better, but don't fix the probem that's causing that much squat - bad weight distribution.

IMHO, you could have solved the problem better, safer, and easier with a $200 weight distributing hitch.

Diesel
05-23-2006, 01:28 PM
With the bags pressured up and mounted to the factory lower coil buckets I was not all that happy with the static height of the bags. Too much piston was showing and I wanted to see a little more extension at ride height. Plus the angle of the factory lower braket put a slight missalignment on the bags wich I also did not like. As a result I built this spacer.

http://img155.imageshack.us/img155/1128/dsc02051r1hu.jpg

http://img155.imageshack.us/img155/9504/dsc02050r9hj.jpg

Here it is installed on the truck. It mounts over the factory lower coil bucket and the Hummer locating puck holds everything in place.

http://img125.imageshack.us/img125/3645/dsc02052r3os.jpg

Diesel
05-23-2006, 01:31 PM
My opinion: tow vehicle squat is a function of frame geometry and bad weight distribution, not inadequate springs. IMHO the better (and cheaper/easier) solution is to improve the frame geometry with a weight distributing hitch. Stiffer rear springs make the vehicle look better, but don't fix the probem that's causing that much squat - bad weight distribution.

IMHO, you could have solved the problem better, safer, and easier with a $200 weight distributing hitch.

I don't belive there is enough wheel base in the Yukon for the weight distributing hitch to work effectively. I believe the coil springs are just too light. The factory spring rate is around 210 which just cannot handle the extra weight. It was designed to ride well not tow.

G-man
05-23-2006, 01:35 PM
Nice write up Diesel, If I need anything more done to my jeep you might have the solution. When I had a 97 Tahoe I put the firestone airbags in. The problem in SUV's is the ride is built for a car and not towing.

Diesel
05-23-2006, 01:43 PM
So here is a final picture of the bags installed and pressured up at ride height.

http://img470.imageshack.us/img470/7987/dsc02054r5rh.jpg

http://img129.imageshack.us/img129/7486/dsc02055r5ef.jpg

At full compression on the bump stops.

http://img129.imageshack.us/img129/1642/dsc02058r7vz.jpg

Close to full extension.

http://img470.imageshack.us/img470/392/dsc02057r7pk.jpg

jimmer2880
05-23-2006, 01:46 PM
Nice write up Diesel, If I need anything more done to my jeep you might have the solution. When I had a 97 Tahoe I put the firestone airbags in. The problem in SUV's is the ride is built for a car and not towing.

CAUTION - Threadjack ahead!

I have added rear helper-springs to my wife's '99 suburban. But, I am comptemplating putting a hitch on the front for when we take the dock in & out. Problem is, the tongue weight of the dock trailer when the dock is loaded, is significant. The 'burban handles it well on the rear, but will probably do very poorly if hooked to the front. Since it's a 1500, it uses only torsion bars & shocks, no coil springs, etc. I would love to put air-bags on the front of it, but have not found any which will work yet. I don't like air-shocks, because you're putting more weight on the shock bracket then it's designed for.

Do you know of a way to put bags on the front of a <1999 era 1500 suburban?

bigmac
05-23-2006, 01:46 PM
I don't belive there is enough wheel base in the Yukon for the weight distributing hitch to work effectively. I believe the coil springs are just too light. The factory spring rate is around 210 which just cannot handle the extra weight. It was designed to ride well not tow.

My experience is different. I went through the same thing when my wife bought a 7800# GVW horse trailer to haul behind her 2002 Yukon. Bad squat, bad steering - noticably light in the front end. Braking and steering on gravel was disastrous and unacceptably dangerous. My first thought was overload springs for the rear - the guy at the parts counter advised against it, prompting me to investigate more thoroughly. I picked up a weight distributing hitch for the thing and the difference was night and day - solved the handling, braking and squatting problem.

On the placard printed on the back of your Yukon's hitch (or in owner's manual), look at the difference in towing capacity and tongue weight if you use a weight distributing hitch. That difference isn't because the frame, hitch or rear springs aren't strong enough, it's because the frame geometry can only stand so much bad weight distribution before the vehicle just stops handling safely. Re-distribute the weight and the vehicle's towing capacity goes way up.

Just my observation based on a lot of investigation and a little experience. Your problem might not be as severe as mine was since your trailer GVW and tongue weight is less than my horse trailer, but IMHO, anytime a trailer causes vehicle squat, it's bad weight distribution, not bad springs.

Diesel
05-23-2006, 01:54 PM
To manage the air in the springs I turned to Airlift and there SureSet system.

http://www.airliftcompany.com/images/SureSetKitShot.jpg

It controls the pressure in the air springs and automatically keeps them at a consistent pressure. This was manditory since my wife usually drives the truck and I did not want here worrying about the filling/venting the springs. Unloaded the springs see 59psi at ride height. With the boat the springs see 72psi at the same ride height.

I upgraded the compressor in the Kit to a Viair 325c for a little more added volume. I found a spot under the hood to mount the compressor and valve block. Here are a couple of pics.

http://img129.imageshack.us/img129/9999/dsc02074r8sb.jpg

http://img470.imageshack.us/img470/5434/dsc02073r1cs.jpg

Diesel
05-23-2006, 02:00 PM
My experience is different. I went through the same thing when my wife bought a 7800# GVW horse trailer to haul behind her 2002 Yukon.

Just my observation based on a lot of investigation and a little experience. Your problem might not be as severe as mine was since your trailer GVW and tongue weight is less than my horse trailer, but IMHO, anytime a trailer causes vehicle squat, it's bad weight distribution, not bad springs.

Wow I could not imagine 7800# behind this truck! :eek:

Yes I agree with you and think the situations are much different. In your case a WD was the only answer. I expect her trailer was double the tounge weight of my MC. I am still way under the tow rating for bumper pull and no WD hitch at 4000#. :)

Diesel
05-23-2006, 02:07 PM
Here is the controller in the cab.

http://img129.imageshack.us/img129/6346/dsc02078r6ha.jpg

Ride height pics:

At 5psi on the bump stops

http://img124.imageshack.us/img124/2287/dsc02060r9zb.jpg

At 89psi at full extension

http://img129.imageshack.us/img129/1861/dsc02062r6um.jpg

Diesel
05-23-2006, 02:11 PM
CAUTION - Threadjack ahead!

I have added rear helper-springs to my wife's '99 suburban. But, I am comptemplating putting a hitch on the front for when we take the dock in & out. Problem is, the tongue weight of the dock trailer when the dock is loaded, is significant. The 'burban handles it well on the rear, but will probably do very poorly if hooked to the front. Since it's a 1500, it uses only torsion bars & shocks, no coil springs, etc. I would love to put air-bags on the front of it, but have not found any which will work yet. I don't like air-shocks, because you're putting more weight on the shock bracket then it's designed for.

Do you know of a way to put bags on the front of a <1999 era 1500 suburban?

There is no way to safely, cheply increase the weight carrying capcity of the GM IFS. The burban has the highest spring rate torsion bar in the 1500 series truck but exactly how much weight are we talking??

bigmac
05-23-2006, 02:11 PM
Wow I could not imagine 7800# behind this truck! :eek:

Yes I agree with you and think the situations are much different. In your case a WD was the only answer. I expect her trailer was double the tounge weight of my MC. I am still way under the tow rating for bumper pull and no WD hitch at 4000#. :)

That Yukon with WD hitch handled very well with that trailer, actually, and the weights were well within the allowable envelope. My biggest problem was finding an electric brake controller that was intuitive and flexible. After a few highway trailer-brake lockups with just a touch of the pedal, I finally stumbled on the Tekonsha Prodigy. It's a fantastic controller, and my overall experience with electric brakes makes me look with severe disdain ( :) ) at the entire concept of surge brakes. I hate 'em and would switch to electric brakes on my tandem axle MasterCraft trailer in a heartbeat if I had to trailer much more than the 30-40 miles per year I currently trailer.

In your case, given my experience, I would have gone for a WD hitch simply for the cost and ease of installation. OTOH, yours looks like a fun project, and that certainly has some value... ;)

Diesel
05-23-2006, 02:23 PM
That Yukon with WD hitch handled very well with that trailer, actually, and the weights were well within the allowable envelope. My biggest problem was finding an electric brake controller that was intuitive and flexible. After a few highway trailer-brake lockups with just a touch of the pedal, I finally stumbled on the Tekonsha Prodigy. It's a fantastic controller, and my overall experience with electric brakes makes me look with severe disdain ( :) ) at the entire concept of surge brakes. I hate 'em and would switch to electric brakes on my tandem axle MasterCraft trailer in a heartbeat if I had to trailer much more than the 30-40 miles per year I currently trailer.

In your case, given my experience, I would have gone for a WD hitch simply for the cost and ease of installation. OTOH, yours looks like a fun project, and that certainly has some value... ;)

Did she have an XL? The specs I have show the max trailer weight for the 5.3 Yukon to be: 7500# with the driver only and no gear.

Prodigy is a great controller. Had one in both my Durmaxes and agree with you on the hydro vs. electric issue. Although I here electric over hydro is killer for boat trailer albiet expensive.

jmyers
05-23-2006, 03:01 PM
I have an "02" Tahoe and it has the auto ride system, automatically lifts the back end up when weight is applied! Seems to work good, when I first herd it lifting I thought it was the fuel pump! :rolleyes:

Diesel
05-23-2006, 03:12 PM
I have an "02" Tahoe and it has the auto ride system, automatically lifts the back end up when weight is applied! Seems to work good, when I first herd it lifting I thought it was the fuel pump! :rolleyes:

Autoride is pimp and would have ordered it had I know I was going to be towing the boat with her Yukon. In fact I almost bought a set of the Autoride rear shocks and used them in conjunction with the factory coils but I could not find a decent used set that wasn't major $$.

Ha, ha I did the same thing and thought my father in laws fuel pump was going out in his Denali when I used it last year to tow the boat. :D

zberger
05-23-2006, 03:22 PM
You are quite the craftsman diesel..

I wish I had your paychecks!

ajgressette
05-23-2006, 03:25 PM
Air Lift is the bomb! I put them on all the company trucks. :D

jimmer2880
05-23-2006, 04:50 PM
.....but exactly how much weight are we talking??

Since it doesn't go over the road, I dont' know for sure. I guesimated the weight of the dock by figureing how much it takes to float it & what percentage of the floatation is being used, and came up to around 9,000 lbs, plus another easy thousand for the trailer. For tongue weight, let's just say that it will put my then stock 1988 1500 pickup 1/2 inch off of it's bump-stops.

There is no way to safely, cheply increase the weight carrying capcity of the GM IFS. The burban has the highest spring rate torsion bar in the 1500 series truck but .....

Ohh well. Guess I'll have to keep pulling her from the rear then. It's only once out in the fall, & once in, in the spring (assuming no hurricanes). We just end up in a traction issue every now & then, which pulling from the front would help a lot.

Diesel
05-23-2006, 04:59 PM
Since it doesn't go over the road, I dont' know for sure. I guesimated the weight of the dock by figureing how much it takes to float it & what percentage of the floatation is being used, and came up to around 9,000 lbs, plus another easy thousand for the trailer. For tongue weight, let's just say that it will put my then stock 1988 1500 pickup 1/2 inch off of it's bump-stops.



Ohh well. Guess I'll have to keep pulling her from the rear then. It's only once out in the fall, & once in, in the spring (assuming no hurricanes). We just end up in a traction issue every now & then, which pulling from the front would help a lot.

Any pics of this? I am having a hard time picturing a dock and trailer......... we obviously don't have the freezing issue down here. :D

jimmer2880
05-23-2006, 08:05 PM
Any pics of this? I am having a hard time picturing a dock and trailer......... we obviously don't have the freezing issue down here. :D

One of these days, I really need to take some pic's. But, I always forget to.

My dock is a floating covered U - 18x24 with a cable lift.

I do have a pic of the doc (posted it on this site before).

Don't get me wrong - I wouldn't take it more than the 1/4 mile I do now if I didn't absolutely have to.

jimmer2880
05-23-2006, 08:13 PM
Hopefully, this will be a link to the doc pic I have in Member Galleries

http://www.tmcowners.com/photopost/showphoto.php?photo=1110&cat=500&ppuser=94&sl=j

Now, just imagine that, sitting on a 20' wide trailer, hooked up to a '99 1500 suburban, or an '88 1500 pickup. Every now & then, we need to hook something to the front of the vehicle when pulling out though (usually, when the ramp is very wet).

bigmac
05-23-2006, 09:57 PM
Did she have an XL? The specs I have show the max trailer weight for the 5.3 Yukon to be: 7500# with the driver only and no gear.

Prodigy is a great controller. Had one in both my Durmaxes and agree with you on the hydro vs. electric issue. Although I here electric over hydro is killer for boat trailer albiet expensive.

Her's was an SLT with 5.3 liter. It did fine. I doubt she ever hit max GVW on the trailer, but did fairly often tow 2 horses in the slant-load with gear and tack in the little changing room. I'm sure it was pushing the tow capacity limits at times, but the vehicle did fine. It may be just as well that that Yukon didn't have a transmission temp gauge, though...

dapicatti
05-24-2006, 12:38 AM
OK you are all making me nervous. We are making the jump from a Jeep Grand Cherokee to a new Denali. Are we going to have the same problem unless we make major adjustments? The jeep looked like it dropped 12" when we attached the new X-2...hence the switch.
:confused: :confused:

Leroy
05-24-2006, 01:43 AM
I have the same on my 2000 Lexus and it works great also! Drop the boat on and see it sink some and then start and it's all level again.



I have an "02" Tahoe and it has the auto ride system, automatically lifts the back end up when weight is applied! Seems to work good, when I first herd it lifting I thought it was the fuel pump! :rolleyes:

ted shred
05-24-2006, 02:10 AM
I had the same squating problem with my GMC. I pull a single axle and they tend to have more tounge weight. I weighed mine and was 410 lbs with the boat and all our junk on board. This exeeded the weight carrying hitch tounge weight rating, but not the weight distributing hitch tounge rating. So i got a weight distributing hitch and what a differance. It really does move the weight down toward the front of the truck frame. As I played around with it I found I could actually lower the front end of the truck if I wanted to. I think I paid about $180 for it.It really solved the problem with out keeping all that weight on the rear end of the truck where it will screw up the handling.

AZHAWK
05-24-2006, 04:15 AM
At the end of last season I sold my Duarmax due to the inceasing cost of diesel, poor fuel mileage, and an overheating problem GM cannot seem to fix. As a result we used my wife's Yukon to tow the boat at the end of the season.

It turned out great but it looks like maybe you should have kept the diesel... Diesel! :D

A lot of work, money, and time. How much are you really going to save on gas?
Gasser vs. Diesel fuel consumption while towing... :confused:

Or maybe I missed your point for selling the Duramax. Overheating? Who knows...

jimmer2880
05-24-2006, 07:01 AM
All this talk about putting weight distributing hitches on our trailers has me thinking.... Since our boats are surge-brakes, if the weight-distro system is brought up snug, would there be enough free-play for the surge-brake tongue to move enough during a stop?

bigmac
05-24-2006, 08:24 AM
OK you are all making me nervous. We are making the jump from a Jeep Grand Cherokee to a new Denali. Are we going to have the same problem unless we make major adjustments? The jeep looked like it dropped 12" when we attached the new X-2...hence the switch.
:confused: :confused:

I have an '03 Denali pickup that I tow with and I don't get any enough squat to worry about with my MasterCraft trailer, but I only trailer about 40 miles/year. The new Denali SUVs are a little different in the suspension department, my guess is you'll get some squat. Price weight distributing hitch vs aftermarket air shocks or overload springs. The problem with stiffening the rear springs to accomodate a trailer is that it's difficult to do without affecting the no-trailer ride.

dapicatti
05-24-2006, 10:55 AM
Thanks BigMac- we live over 1 hour away from any water, so we trailer everywhere. Every other weekend its a 3 hour trip to and from the lake and then we switch to the River which is only a little over an hour. Trailering is a big part of our boating experience, so I will definately check into the hitch. I am just glad to know that there is something we can do since the 07 Yukon Denali has shipped from the factory and will be here in a week or so. :) I just didn't feel the Jeep was up to the challenge since there are many large hills involved.

bigmac
05-24-2006, 11:19 AM
Thanks BigMac- we live over 1 hour away from any water, so we trailer everywhere. Every other weekend its a 3 hour trip to and from the lake and then we switch to the River which is only a little over an hour. Trailering is a big part of our boating experience, so I will definately check into the hitch. I am just glad to know that there is something we can do since the 07 Yukon Denali has shipped from the factory and will be here in a week or so. :) I just didn't feel the Jeep was up to the challenge since there are many large hills involved.

My '03 Denali pickup has been a fantastic tow vehicle, except for gas mileage. My lifetime average over 45,000 miles, according to the computer, has been 14.1 mpg. I'm trading it in in a month or so and I'm distressed that the new Denali pickups are a) only available in crew cab with 5 foot bed, and b) 4-wheel steering is no longer available.

I own several trailers of various sizes (9 of 'em). I've even gone so far as to buy a Sherline scale (http://www.sherline.com/lm.htm) for accurate measurement of tongue weight, in conjunction with a periodic trip to the local landfill scale for various trailer weights (which they're happy to do for free). I'm a complete believer in weight-distributing hitches for any trailer where the tongue weight starts approaching the maximum, or if there is any significant squat to the tow vehicle. A WD hitch flattens that sucker right out and makes a huge difference in handling, steering, braking, and suspension performance.

http://www.sherline.com/images/LM2000pic.jpg

dapicatti
05-24-2006, 11:24 AM
I am not looking forward to the decreased gas mileage, but if it tows better it way outweighs repairs to the Jeep. We currently only get about 17 mpg max anyway on the Jeep. I will start calling around today for the HD hitch. I really appreciate your advice.

ted shred
05-24-2006, 01:30 PM
All this talk about putting weight distributing hitches on our trailers has me thinking.... Since our boats are surge-brakes, if the weight-distro system is brought up snug, would there be enough free-play for the surge-brake tongue to move enough during a stop?

My surge brakes are Atwood. Their instuctions show how to mount the equalizing bars to the trailer for the brakes to work properly. The bottom link on the chain that is on the equalizer bar must be in front of the toplink that is attached to the trailer by 32 degrees. This allows for the movement of the actuator. I have had no troubles with this set up.

jimmer2880
05-25-2006, 06:50 AM
My surge brakes are Atwood. Their instuctions show how to mount the equalizing bars to the trailer for the brakes to work properly. The bottom link on the chain that is on the equalizer bar must be in front of the toplink that is attached to the trailer by 32 degrees. This allows for the movement of the actuator. I have had no troubles with this set up.

Very cool. Thanks.

P-hat_in_Cincy
05-25-2006, 09:04 AM
Hey all,
I didn't read thru the entire thread, so forgive me if it's been posted. Our '04 205V made our '00 Yukon XL squat more than our former '02 X10 did. I ended buying a 'riser' (rather than drop) for the hitch and it has helped out. I think it took some of the tonque weight off. What I KNOW is that the trailer sits level and it kept the connection from binding (wouldn't come off ball w/o bouncing on rear bumber).
Paul

bigmac
05-25-2006, 10:07 AM
Hey all,
I didn't read thru the entire thread, so forgive me if it's been posted. Our '04 205V made our '00 Yukon XL squat more than our former '02 X10 did. I ended buying a 'riser' (rather than drop) for the hitch and it has helped out. I think it took some of the tonque weight off. What I KNOW is that the trailer sits level and it kept the connection from binding (wouldn't come off ball w/o bouncing on rear bumber).
Paul

From a physics standpoint, I can't envision any way that different rear springs or changes in drop-hitch geometry would affect tongue weight, positive or negative. Binding, yes -- actual weight, no. In turn, the weight on the tongue being the same, then the weight on the rear springs/axle is the same, and therefore the forces taking weight OFF the front wheels is the same.

One thing that a ball-hitch riser WOULD do, which might be beneficial to the trailer (not the tow vehicle) is equalize the weight on both trailer axles. If the trailer tongue angles too low, it puts more weight on the front trailer axle. OPtimally, the weight would be the same on both axles. If your 205V trailer is only a single axle, then never mind...

Diesel
05-25-2006, 11:18 AM
OK you are all making me nervous. We are making the jump from a Jeep Grand Cherokee to a new Denali. Are we going to have the same problem unless we make major adjustments? The jeep looked like it dropped 12" when we attached the new X-2...hence the switch.
:confused: :confused:

Almost every DENALI I have looked at had the AutoRide Z55 RPO on it. I think is might be standard equipemnt on the Denali package, not sure though. If you have not bought the Denali yet I would make sure you get the AutoRide option. It works very well and will alway keep your vehicle at the proper ride height regardless of load. :)

bigmac
05-25-2006, 11:22 AM
Almost every DENALI I have looked at had the AutoRide Z55 RPO on it. I think is might be standard equipemnt on the Denali package, not sure though. If you have not bought the Denali yet I would make sure you get the AutoRide option. It works very well and will alway keep your vehicle at the proper ride height regardless of load. :)

My '03 Denali doesn't have that - instead it has a little button that just changes the shock valving, so I can choose between soft and firm ride. I do think that the autoride is standard on the Denali package these days.

Diesel
05-25-2006, 11:25 AM
It turned out great but it looks like maybe you should have kept the diesel... Diesel! :D

A lot of work, money, and time. How much are you really going to save on gas?
Gasser vs. Diesel fuel consumption while towing... :confused:

Or maybe I missed your point for selling the Duramax. Overheating? Who knows...

Long story but in a nut shell it averaged less than 10mpg towing, ran very, very hot, and just was not a good truck. I had an 02 Duramax (LB7) I ran for 90K without issue and decided in 04 to upgrade to the "new" LLY Duramax engine (big mistake). More horsepower, torque, etc........................ well it is apparent GM forgot to upgrade the cooling capacity to deal with the extra horspower. Many many people had their trucks bought back by GM over this issue. The latest Duramax the LBZ seems to be a very good engine and GM has addressed the cooling shortcomings of the LLY. Time will tell since the LBZ is fairly new and just now entering the summer months for the first year.

Anyway with diesel prices so much more than gas and added expense of mantaining a diesel I decide to drive a gasser for a while. I am going to wait and see what GM has in store for the new GMT900 platform trucks. So far so good from what I have seen. Definately want to get back in a diesel as soon as possible. :)

Diesel
05-25-2006, 11:32 AM
My '03 Denali doesn't have that - instead it has a little button that just changes the shock valving, so I can choose between soft and firm ride. I do think that the autoride is standard on the Denali package these days.

You have a pickup right? The Denali pickups still have leaf spring rear suspensions so they do not need the Autoride option and it probably was not avaliable, just the adjustible shocks.

I just checked GMs web page and on the 07s Denali Yukon and Yukon XL AutoRide is standard equipment. The previous generation I am not sure if it was standard or an option.