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View Full Version : need advice installing course


jlf
05-18-2006, 08:44 AM
okay there is no course anywhere close to where I live so a bunch of us got together and are thinking of putting something in the river which is semi-permanent. We want to basically permanently install the main lines which will remain anchored and permanetly under water, when we want to use the course we'll have to dive down and attach the bouys to the main line. This way the main line will sink back to the bottom and not be a bother to anyone else on the river. Basically anyone who knows it's there and has a set of bouys will be able to use the course then. I know 6balls has done something similar on a river near him. I am hoping for some suggestions on how to go about this and materials I might need. I know there could also be some DNR issues, we'll cross that bridge when we come to it. A big concern now is how to deal with the current from the river. Any advice or help would be greatly appreciated. The nearest course that I know of is over three hours away, that is a long haul for a few sets (especially with gas prices). Looked into the insta-slalom but a bit out of my price range for now, we don't figure we'll have that much into materials to build something.

#47of100TeamMC
05-18-2006, 08:53 AM
Sounds like a lot of work to be diving down 22 times to attach buoys each time you want to use it... I'd look at EZ-Slalom and get a river current adapter. Call Bob at EZ and get the scoop from him. SUPER nice guy and the BEST customer service you could ever ask for. Granted if your trying to save some money, you can even get a booklet to build your own from him for 35$ and then either ask him for dimensions for a river current adapter, or just figure it out on your own with simple Trig.

Oh, and that could solve your DNR problems too, if you take it out each time you use it, you shouldn't need a floating structures permit.

Check him out. www.ez-slalom.com (http://www.ez-slalom.com/)

ntidsl
05-18-2006, 09:14 AM
It will end up costing you about the same to try to do it yourself...rivers are fun and convenient but the current and debris sucks for skiing courses...try to find a creek off the river or a back water and take it in and out every couple days...we are on the ohio and find backwaters with 10' depths perfect for courses...but we also run a private club on some old quarries...check for a used course on ebay etc...peole buy them and use them once and they sit...the first time setting it up sucks, next time is better and by the 10th time you could do it in the dark!

If you are set on a permanent. try accu sink or something like that...

east tx skier
05-18-2006, 10:59 AM
So are you going to individually anchor the balls or will you be using a mainline with arms like the standard portable course? I reposted a DIY submersible course post from another forum on here a while back.

So is your question (1) how do we find it? or (2) What's a good way to set it up? I guess I'm just confused.

We set one up from scratch in our cove, but the depth was much smaller. The buoys and boat guides were the most expensive parts. If I was to do it over again, I'd have bought less rope and just done it by line of site since that's what we ultimately did to straighten it out.

rodltg2
05-18-2006, 11:31 AM
i agree, it not only going to cost you the same ( in my case more). plus its a pain in the *** to find all the stuff locally . and.. you will need a big area to lay out the sections..

just buy one..

88 PS190
05-18-2006, 11:56 AM
The materials really add up actually. The cost and time required to build these things, and find the correct material, and as rod mentioned the space that you need to have to lay them out becomes quite costly.

Additionally, in order to build the triangle sections its almost essential to design a jig so that everything is square and held in place while you work on it.

Some people who are in fairly shallow water use the ez-slalom system and then remove the bouys and let the course sink, then they come along and snag the course pull it up and attach the bouys, in a river this would make me nervous, current, along with debris could foul or damage your course, and you could loose components.

Really the ez-slalom system doesn't take too long to set up and if you have 3+ buddies along you can get it in, ski all afternoon, and pull it out with out too much hassle.

shepherd
05-18-2006, 01:37 PM
I built my own portable course once. Take my advice: don't do it just to save some money. Like they say above, you won't save too much money and you'll just have more headaches than it's worth.

It sounds like you got a bunch of ski buddies. If so, splitting the cost of an insta-slalom shouldn't hurt too bad anyways.

east tx skier
05-18-2006, 03:12 PM
Rough estimate of what I spent setting up a DIY individually anchored course on a shallow, soft, mud bottom with magnets, but without 55m buoys is $378. Finding it is not so much a problem, but setting it up can be time consuming for one person using one reference line and some carefully measured rope. I'm going to use some of the rope I used to set it up, mark the lengths from our dock, and use that to find all the boat guides. This should cut our setup time substantially.

Setup with two people currently takes 45--60 minutes. Tear down time is 15 minutes.

MYMC
05-18-2006, 03:30 PM
Putting balls in the water is like putting holes in a nice walking area and then trying to knock a small white ball into them...a good walk ruined...

east tx skier
05-18-2006, 03:38 PM
It's a good way to make yourself more obsessed with the water than you would be during a walk across the desert.

Tom023
05-18-2006, 03:48 PM
Rough estimate of what I spent setting up a DIY individually anchored course on a shallow, soft, mud bottom with magnets, but without 55m buoys is $378. Finding it is not so much a problem, but setting it up can be time consuming for one person using one reference line and some carefully measured rope. I'm going to use some of the rope I used to set it up, mark the lengths from our dock, and use that to find all the boat guides. This should cut our setup time substantially.

Setup with two people currently takes 45--60 minutes. Tear down time is 15 minutes.

Eastie, wouldn't have been easier just to spray paint those weeds with turn buoy orange paint? :D

east tx skier
05-18-2006, 03:54 PM
Don't even get me started on those awful things. During the peak summer months we have to do some serious cutting.

Tom023
05-18-2006, 03:59 PM
That's hilarious. I hope you don't have any gators lurking under there...more pressure to stay in the course.

east tx skier
05-18-2006, 04:44 PM
On the lake, yes. We've had an 8 footer take up residence on a part of the river where we used to start our free ski runs. Now we start further down (not that he wants anything to do with us or our boat).

In and around the course, I've never seen one (knock wood). You see those trees off in the distance. That's Louisiana. So I'm not all that surprised by the gators.

We thought about putting one of these (http://www.wildlifecontrolsupplies.com/Merchant2/merchant.mvc?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=NWS001&Product_Code=WCSGG01) around the perimeter to ward off the occassional fisherman that happens by the course. Of course, some of those guys are packing, so it might not last all that long.

Brent
05-18-2006, 05:28 PM
You are showing great dedication in considering diving for the course every time, but it has to be simpler . How about running ropes to shore attached to segments of the course? EZ slalom does seem to be a attractive option as the amount of effort & money that may put into it will most likely be much greater than your think. :eek:

east tx skier
05-18-2006, 05:45 PM
Check out this thread about a DIY Submersible Course (http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=5790&highlight=submersible).

jlf
05-19-2006, 09:00 AM
Basically I was looking for input on how to build it, if anyone has done such a thing. The plan isn't mine really, I just thought this would be a great fountain on knowledge, maybe spark some brilliant ideas on how to make it work. That being said, I don't care much on the cost. The guy who wants to build it has all the balls and the materials he thinks he'll need. I had told him I'd dig around and see what I could come up with as far as things others had tried. The river we want to use is only 4-6 feet deep for the most part. I have skied a course on a river 3 hours from me, they do something similar, they have some sort of main line permanently in the water, then they find the boat guides first, once one of them is attached the rest went really easy, just walked and hung onto main line attached at you went. The six balls, I am not sure if they were anchored individually or connected somehow to the structure under water. I was really hoping 6balls would chime in here, because it is on the river he skies. I think it took us roughly a half hours to install couse and like 10 minutes to take it down. Basicaly all they are doing is removing the balls so it doesn't look like anything is in the water permanently. I suggested an insta slalom or something to the guy and his response was no money for one. I am willing to do whatever I can to help him get something in the water that will work, because driving over three hours gets really old to ski. If he can make something work, I get to use it. :D

ntidsl
05-19-2006, 10:39 AM
in that case...stainless steel cables and bungee cords...and alot of measuring...someone wil come along with exact measurements and advice real soon...have fun...I ski courses 90 percent of the time and really enjoy it but theres nothing like getting off the course and open skiing on a saturday evening...just hanging out, drinking beer, skiing and listening to tunes (reggae my preference)...designated driver of course...and watching the sunset through some walls of water with no balls in the way!

east tx skier
05-19-2006, 11:08 AM
Instead of bungee cords, I'd suggest buying 3/8" surgical latex (got mine for $10 for 100' (cut into 10' sections) on ebay) and the clips from skier to skier. We tried bungee first. The hooks kept coming loose and the latex would've been much cheaper. Others have recommended cutting old innertubes in lieu of latex. Just food for thought.

jlf
05-22-2006, 09:22 AM
Sounds good. I read through the thread when Eastie wanted to put his course in, found some good info there too. Funny how motivated you can get to find info when it isn't your dime and you get to use the course!!