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Holtrodj
10-06-2004, 08:22 PM
I need a little advice - I just bought my first Mastercraft (1996 Prostar 190) with the single axle MC trailer. I think I got a pretty good deal, but the catch is I live in Michigan and I have to pick it up in Lousiana. :eek:

My tow vehilce is a 1998 GMC Jimmy with the 4.3L Vortec. It has the tow package (hitch, tranny cooler, etc.) but I just want to know what everyone thinks about the combo... Does the Jimmy have enough to pull a '96 190? Does anyone use a similar tow vehicle? :confused:

Thanks for the Help!

dwe
10-06-2004, 08:27 PM
Should be fine. I pull mine w/ a '95 caprice v8. I have a friend who pulls his 190 w/ a tacoma 4cyl.

BriEOD
10-06-2004, 08:40 PM
I think that a Jimmy will be fine. That boat/trailer is well with in the limits of the towing capability.

VTJC
10-06-2004, 08:56 PM
Not great for regular long trip use but will work for one trip and around home use. My brother picked up my 99 MC SportStar(95-97 Prostar Hull) in FL and towed it to VT with his 4.3 Blazer. The boat is 2400lbs dry and lets say another 800-100 for trailer so your only looking at 3,500 lbs. Just make sure the trailer tires, bearding and brakes are up to the trip. My bro got two flats on the trailer on the trip north because the tires had dry rotted over 5 years. Jamie

Holtrodj
10-06-2004, 09:08 PM
I appreciate your help here. The trailer reportedly has brand new tires and a new spare so I should be in good shape with that. Does anyone know if these MC trailers have bearing buddies or do they need to be greased internally? What do I need to check for on the brakes? I'm really not firmilliar with these surge brakes...

What about straps? Do most people strap the boat (rear) to the trailer for long distances or no need?

BriEOD
10-06-2004, 09:49 PM
Should have bearing buddies on their. However, ya' never know. You'll get conflicting opinions about strapping the boat to the trailer. Myself, I think it is a good idea. You can never be to safe.

Cody
10-06-2004, 11:03 PM
I wouldn't worry about the truck too much either. They may not be made for every day towing like that, but a trip every now and then won't hurt. I am taking my Tacoma 6 cyl TRD 600 miles down to Dallas this weekend to pick up my newly aquired mastercraft. I never even gave it a second though as to whether the truck would make it. That whole $2.00 per gallon of gas sure hurts though.


Just in case...
I am right off I-55 in Northern MS. If you have any problems in that area let me know. I should be back Saturday, I hope.

(662)-513-3781.

Cody

VTJC
10-06-2004, 11:08 PM
I strap my boat down so that a minor accident doesnít end up with boat on the ground. I have a strap that goes over the back, since the platform would be in the way for the rear toe eyes. The major thing to check on the brakes is the fluid level in the tongue. For such a long trip with a smallish tow vehicle its probably worth having the brakes checked by a pro. You also might consider getting the bearings check to if they havenít been repacked or used much recently. After the FL to VT trip, I had bearing packed and new rotors/pads put on my trailer for a couple hundred. Should be good for 5 years. Jamie

jimmer2880
10-07-2004, 06:00 AM
I remove my swim platform when I tow over the road. This also gives access to the 2 rear eyes (although I don't use them). I will strap the boat down. I throw the strap over the top & wrap/duct tape wash-cloths around the strap where it touches the glass.

Otherwise - like everyone else said... you'll be fine. Be sure the spare has air in it and your jack will work on the trailer if you need it!

jimmer2880
10-07-2004, 06:00 AM
I strap my boat down so that a minor accident doesnít end up with boat on the ground. I have a strap that goes over the back, since the platform would be in the way for the rear toe eyes. The major thing to check on the brakes is the fluid level in the tongue. For such a long trip with a smallish tow vehicle its probably worth having the brakes checked by a pro. You also might consider getting the bearings check to if they havenít been repacked or used much recently. After the FL to VT trip, I had bearing packed and new rotors/pads put on my trailer for a couple hundred. Should be good for 5 years. Jamie
where in Northern VT? My sister lives in Stowe with a Tristar 190.

Footin
10-07-2004, 08:49 AM
The Jimmy should be OK. I use to tow with a 1997 Jimmy and it did pretty good, make sure NOT to tow in over drive.
I did install air shocks to help the rear end of the truck and they really did the trick.

tex
10-07-2004, 09:19 AM
I need a little advice - I just bought my first Mastercraft (1996 Prostar 190) with the single axle MC trailer. I think I got a pretty good deal, but the catch is I live in Michigan and I have to pick it up in Lousiana. :eek:

My tow vehilce is a 1998 GMC Jimmy with the 4.3L Vortec. It has the tow package (hitch, tranny cooler, etc.) but I just want to know what everyone thinks about the combo... Does the Jimmy have enough to pull a '96 190? Does anyone use a similar tow vehicle? :confused:

Thanks for the Help!
I have a 96 Jimmy w/same motor. it had higher gears put in the rear end to help w/gas milage. i tow my 02 197 w/no problem. I live in Fort Worth and have towed to Lake Conroe and LBJ(4 hours)a bunch w/no issues. It actually does ok on the ramp, other then sliding backwards.

NeilM
10-07-2004, 09:27 AM
I have a '97 Jimmy 4.3L with the factory trailer towing package (oil cooler, trans cooler, 3.73 gears, HD alternator) that I use to pull my MariStar, which is quite a bit heavier than the ProStar, through the Rocky Mountains -- absolutely no problems. All the advice here is dead on re: bearings, brakes, and making sure your jack fits..

Rockman
10-07-2004, 01:42 PM
We towed our BF 200 with our 1994 Blazer 4.3 Vortec. We got 187k miles out of it with no tranny problems.

There was another thread started by ekoehler that talked about a trip down to Texas (I think) and about a van with the 4.3 liter in it. Check that out. Some good tips in there.

Be nice to the tranny or you'll see it in your rear view mirror! :eek3:

River Rat
10-07-2004, 02:23 PM
Things to carry with you:
Floor jack and large Ĺ socket set for changing a tire.(the lugs on the trailer may not match your truck) also may help in getting your spare off the trailer
Grease gun, stop at 50 miles and feel for excessive heat on your bearings. And then at every stop after that. a couple shots of grease goes a long way
2 straps strap to secure back and front of boat. Hit a good bump and the back of your boat will come off the trailer. (been there / done that)
On a long trip I try to carry another spare tire. Itís easy to find someone to put a good tire on your trailer rim but itís hard to find a location to buy one. After one flat you no longer have a spare

Thrall
10-07-2004, 03:01 PM
Everything river rat said, plus. Just normal trailering, I put 2 straps on the back tiedowns to the trlr frame. I've got the same boat and it doesn't take much of a bump to bounce the boat around on the bunks. Strap from the bow eye to the trlr or across the boat behind the windshield doesn't hurt either.
Tools: The more the better. Bring tools for tire change. Bottle jack won't fit under the axle when the tir's flat. Floor jack or scissor jack will. I think your Chev has a scissor jack. 1 spare is a must, 2 spares is advisable, or at least tow during business hrs when you can get a new tire. If possible get a wheel bearing set, so that you can replace bearings if you smoke one. It'll be hard to find them along the interstate if you need them.
A single axle trailer will be harder on tires and bearings running long distances than a tandem. Since you may not know the condition/use of the trailer, be prepard for all of the above.
Regular greasing along the way is needed, especially if the hubs are getting hotter than warm to the touch. If the hubs are hot and the grease is breaking down in viscosity, don't be afraid to pump all new grease in the bearings each time you fuel up.
It's good if your truck is tuned up and trans/t-case/rear diff oils are changed. That's a pretty good load for the S-10.

Footin
10-07-2004, 03:18 PM
Good advice, but one more thing: I always carry an extra trailer light with me, it never fails we blow one at night 3 hours from home. I also always carry a small box with some extra wire, wire connecters and a cheap test light. We all know how well MC wires the trialers....hahaha.

OhioProstar
10-07-2004, 03:22 PM
Just a thought, have you considered having it delivered to you? If a S-10 Blazer gets 15-16 per gallon w/o a load you can maybe average 11 or 12 with a boat. Lets say it is 1500 miles to LA....that is 93 gallons going down and 136 gallons of gas back at $2 per gallon. That is $459 just in fuel. If you add in extra tires, etc.....it might be cheaper to strap it to the back of a semi.

A guy in the office next to me just shipped a car to CA from OH for $1500 in a covered autotrailer. I put a bid out on this site when I was looking for boats two years ago and got three or four quotes from Phoenix to Dayton for around $1200

www.1staboard.com

Footin
10-07-2004, 03:43 PM
I would like to know what it costs to have a boat shipped also, I have been looking for a 205 east of the mississippi due to driving distance; however if it cheap enough I could extend my search.

Holtrodj
10-16-2004, 05:11 PM
I looked into this and it was going to cost around $8-$900 to have it shipped from LA to MI. I figured I could go get it for fuel costs arond half that price... I'd just incur the added milage.