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Blair
05-04-2006, 12:49 AM
ok stupid question of the night... (first time inboard owner)

what is this tow hook for? 06 X-10
http://img427.imageshack.us/img427/710/mcx10demo104s7hb.jpg


also the other question is where would you tow a tube from ( im thinking the ski pylon) but just want to make sure

Ric
05-04-2006, 12:51 AM
that hook is for anything you want to use it for (except lifting)

east tx skier
05-04-2006, 12:51 AM
I think the second question answers the first. Tow hook for the tubes. We never use ours.

Blair
05-04-2006, 01:19 AM
so how strong is that tow hook? strong enough for 2 of us grown men to have those ocassiona tube wars (although im not seeing it getting used a whole lot i dont want to do any damage to the new boat

Kell
05-04-2006, 02:36 AM
We use that tow hook for the 5 person "rocket", so I would imagine that two tubes would be just fine. Nice looking x-10, post more pics. :D We use the pylon just for waterskiing/boarding.

Tom023
05-04-2006, 11:20 AM
I have often thought the same thing. Given how more robust the pylon is versus the tow hook, I would never tow anything with the hook, the pylon just makes more sense and it gets the rope up off the water. I use the handle to tie off tubes if just floating.

atlfootr
05-04-2006, 11:51 AM
Tow hook for the tubes.
We never use ours.Me neither :noface: NEVER!
NO TUBES ALLOWED ON MY BOAT:rant:

erkoehler
05-04-2006, 12:18 PM
That hook is pretty strong....I have towed stranded boats back the the ramp with the hook.

There was one time when old tri-hull outboard boat was broken down 2 miles up river from the launch. He asked if we would tow him in. We had just got on the river, the water was glass, and this was going to take a good 1/2 hour of more of idling back to the ramp. :rant:

So, we threw him two dock lines (thickest we could find) and had him tie off to the bow eye. I attached the rope to the tow hook on the back of the 1996 190 and took out the slack. I told the guy to trim the motor all the way up, and sit down. Once that was done, I pulled the boat right up on plane and was back to the ramp in just a couple minutes :)

The look on his face was priceless :uglyhamme

east tx skier
05-04-2006, 01:18 PM
I tow in stranded boaters a lot. I run the dockline through the two rear lifting eyes. But I won't get past idle no way, no how.

Jim@BAWS
05-04-2006, 01:23 PM
You can use it to pull LIGHT SKIERS/Tubes. It is backed
by a plate and has 2 large 9/16's bolts hodong it down. Pretty much a add on that is not always used. If you purchase a 197/X-7 today
it is actually an option...not standard.

Jim@BAWS

rabooze
05-04-2006, 01:25 PM
Yeah, you got some serious marbles to be opening up the boat to plane when towing another boat. You do realize these things don't have breaks, dont you? :)

I got stranded out on Lake Lanier last summer. The fuel pump went out when i was a long way from home. I fortunately was at a local hangout where a rope swing was and there was another MC owner in there. He towed me back in at a few miles an hour, and we hooked my front eye to his rear hook. Works just fine. Give a pull so karma will help you out in your need.

erkoehler
05-04-2006, 02:15 PM
There were no other boats on the river, but yeah, NO BRAKES!

mtripper
05-04-2006, 02:23 PM
The rear tow eyes are nice for when you have a lot of people in the boat and want to pull all their kids tubing. You can still put people on the rear bench that way. I pull light kids skiing on it as well when we need the rear bench for seating.

River Rat
05-04-2006, 02:31 PM
we use ours to pull our 6 person Bannana and never had any issues. sorry we use a buddy's bu to pull kid tubes :D ..................... from the same location

bigmac
05-04-2006, 04:16 PM
For 15 years I've pulled skiers, multiple kneeboarders, up to 5 adults tubing, and even a parasail behind my Century I/O with its towing eye, which is secured with a backing plate and two 9/16 bolts through the hull - NO damage, no gel coat cracks - nothing. Maybe that Century is built better than my MasterCraft, but I doubt it.

The owner's manual makes no mention of towing limits for that rear towing ring, and there are no specific warranty exclusions that I can find, therefore I assume that damage caused by using that rear towing eye for pulling a couple of tubers, skiers, kneeboarders would be covered under warranty.

Tom023
05-04-2006, 04:35 PM
For 15 years I've pulled skiers, multiple kneeboarders, up to 5 adults tubing, and even a parasail behind my Century I/O with its towing eye, which is secured with a backing plate and two 9/16 bolts through the hull - NO damage, no gel coat cracks - nothing. Maybe that Century is built better than my MasterCraft, but I doubt it.


The big difference I see between the two boats is transom thickness. An I/O has a much thicker transom than a MC because that is where the thrust is transfered to boat, and it supports that heavy outdrive. With an inboard the load is transfered to the stringer system. That doesn't mean the MC's tow hook isn't usable, just seems to me why use it when the pylon is much more sturdy? On a direct drive, however, I can understand wanting to use the rear seat, but on a v-drive we don't have this issue.

bigmac
05-04-2006, 04:51 PM
The big difference I see between the two boats is transom thickness. An I/O has a much thicker transom than a MC because that is where the thrust is transfered to boat, and it supports that heavy outdrive. With an inboard the load is transfered to the stringer system. That doesn't mean the MC's tow hook isn't usable, just seems to me why use it when the pylon is much more sturdy? On a direct drive, however, I can understand wanting to use the rear seat, but on a v-drive we don't have this issue.

The tow eye on my Century is on the upper fiberglass above the rub rail, not through the transom. From the bilge, I can see the backing plate and bolts where they go through the fiberglass.

Tom023
05-04-2006, 04:55 PM
Even more reason to assume it's acceptable on a Mastercraft.

ajgressette
05-04-2006, 05:04 PM
Its made for towing Malibu, Centurion, Correct Craft, Moomba, Sanger and a few others. :headbang:

Evan Jones
05-04-2006, 05:25 PM
I'd say it's a holdover part from a direct drive boat. Only to be used when you need the rear seat. I see no reason to use that hook in a V-drive. Your pylon will work much better. When the rope is pivoting at the back of the boat, it is much more difficult to bring the rope around after a fall. Use the pylon for everything on that V-drive.

bigmac
05-04-2006, 06:05 PM
I'd say it's a holdover part from a direct drive boat. Only to be used when you need the rear seat. I see no reason to use that hook in a V-drive. Your pylon will work much better. When the rope is pivoting at the back of the boat, it is much more difficult to bring the rope around after a fall. Use the pylon for everything on that V-drive.

Can't whip a tube as well from the pylon compared to the rear towing eye.

atlfootr
05-04-2006, 11:53 PM
I got stranded out on Lake Lanier last summer. i was a long way from home. I fortunately was at a local hangout where a rope swing was and there was another MC owner in there.I know were you where (rope swing) on Lanier @ time of break down.
We use to go there all the time ...
Lanier's one place you DON'T want to have to break down.

We also ran the 45 Mile Atlanta Barefoot Endrance Race on Lanier, try barefoot'n in some of the roughest waters around.

T5_Steve
05-05-2006, 12:16 AM
so how strong is that tow hook? strong enough for 2 of us grown men to have those ocassiona tube wars (although im not seeing it getting used a whole lot i dont want to do any damage to the new boat


No one mentioned it, so I'm not sure it's recommended practice, but the few times a year that we go "battle tubing" we hook the tube to the wakeboard tower. They get up on plane much quicker with the upward pull angle. Even with (2) 200+ lb guys on the tubes, I never had any adverse handling or damage when pulling from the tower.

AirJunky
05-05-2006, 01:34 AM
Since the towers & boat manufacturers recommend not to tow boats or tubes from the towers & pylons, the only place left is the rear hooks.
I know a guy in the Delta area who ripped the pylon completely out of a Maristar towing a tube. I imagine he was doing some pretty crazy stuff, but the fact that it was attached so high is what put a ton of leverage on the attachment & ripped it out.

Ric
05-05-2006, 01:51 AM
I used the rear tow hook alot when we didnt have a tower and never had an issue
it was always used to pull anything but slalom in my 190 and we've used it to pull stuff in the 197 as well
it will hold pretty much anything you boys can hook to it but what decent boarder or kneeboarder or slalom skier wants to be towed from there? You can use it, it's plenty strong for double and triple tubers or heavy skiers and boarders, but it's not the primo place to tow from for sure.

Blair
05-05-2006, 02:00 AM
We use that tow hook for the 5 person "rocket", so I would imagine that two tubes would be just fine. Nice looking x-10, post more pics. :D We use the pylon just for waterskiing/boarding.


kell i dont have time to rezise and upload tonight... i will sunday night when i get back from the lake

i do have this one handy though
http://img57.imageshack.us/img57/6646/mcx10demo100s6uv.jpg

this was from our demo ride last fall

Tom023
05-05-2006, 08:41 AM
Since the towers & boat manufacturers recommend not to tow boats or tubes from the towers & pylons, the only place left is the rear hooks.


Mastercraft does for the pylon? I don't see that in my owner's manual or recall seeing it on one of the many warning lables stuck all over, but I'll have to double check. MC uses their pylon construction and mounting as a selling point versus the competition, I don't know how well it works by qualifying that it's not strong enough for tubes. In essence that's saying the tow hook is stronger than the pylon :rolleyes:

If you look at how sturdy the pylon is and how it's mounted to the stringers, I think it's much stronger than two 9/16" bolts running through fiberglass with a backing plate.

jraben8
05-05-2006, 09:41 AM
I've always used the pylon to tow in other manufacturers gear. It's especially fun to tow in a bass boat that has killed his batteries during a tournament.


It's even more fun to hear his buddies laughing at him at the weigh in when he is late...

michael freeman
05-05-2006, 10:30 AM
Since the towers & boat manufacturers recommend not to tow boats or tubes from the towers & pylons, the only place left is the rear hooks.
I know a guy in the Delta area who ripped the pylon completely out of a Maristar towing a tube. I imagine he was doing some pretty crazy stuff, but the fact that it was attached so high is what put a ton of leverage on the attachment & ripped it out.

Actually the manual says that you should only tow skiers, wakeboarders or towables from the tower in two places. Later it says you should only tow wakeboarders, but the sticker on the tower says the first warning.

MC documentation needs some serious proofing work.

bigmac
05-05-2006, 10:43 AM
Mastercraft does for the pylon? I don't see that in my owner's manual or recall seeing it on one of the many warning lables stuck all over, but I'll have to double check. MC uses their pylon construction and mounting as a selling point versus the competition, I don't know how well it works by qualifying that it's not strong enough for tubes. In essence that's saying the tow hook is stronger than the pylon :rolleyes:

If you look at how sturdy the pylon is and how it's mounted to the stringers, I think it's much stronger than two 9/16" bolts running through fiberglass with a backing plate.

In the absence of an authoritative opinion by anyone here, and given the lack of owner's manual clarification on pylon vs tow hook, I'll offer my own uneducated opinion that it seems to me that the pylon's primary benefit is its location, not necessarily its strength. While its mounting is pretty solid, I think its mounting strength is offset by the 3 foot lever-arm with exact 90 degree force vector. I suspect that the rear tow hook is stronger than the pylon for towing , and that the latter's primary benefit is its center-of-boat location, important for skiers.

I've read/heard of pylon bending/breaking/loosening, but I've NOT heard of problems with the rear tow hook. Maybe somebody else here has....?

Tom023
05-05-2006, 11:04 AM
Everybody is entitled to their opionon, mine differs from yours I guess. My pylon in the v-drive is not 3 feet long. In fact it's only about a foot, mounted to a 1/4" aluminum structure that is bolted to each stringer by 8 bolts per side. In the picture, you can see the aluminum structure to the left and the 8 bolts in the floor. I suspect if a pylon let go, it was a result of it being lose, not a matter of strength. I'll take those 16 bolts into the stringers over two 9/16" bolts anyday.

I believe Jim@BAWS is as close to an authoritative opinion as anyone and he stated "light skiers" for the tow hook.

It's your boat, connect to either one, I'm sure both are strong enough.

michael freeman
05-05-2006, 11:06 AM
In the absence of an authoritative opinion by anyone here, and given the lack of owner's manual clarification on pylon vs tow hook, I'll offer my own uneducated opinion that it seems to me that the pylon's primary benefit is its location, not necessarily its strength. While its mounting is pretty solid, I think its mounting strength is offset by the 3 foot lever-arm with exact 90 degree force vector. I suspect that the rear tow hook is stronger than the pylon for towing , and that the latter's primary benefit is its center-of-boat location, important for skiers.

I've read/heard of pylon bending/breaking/loosening, but I've NOT heard of problems with the rear tow hook. Maybe somebody else here has....?

I've heard if you are really going to pull something heavy, you should use the two lifting u-bolts on each side with a Y-harness. They should be one of the strongest things on your boat.

Tom023
05-05-2006, 11:08 AM
I've heard if you are really going to pull something heavy, you should use the two lifting u-bolts on each side with a Y-harness. They should be one of the strongest things on your boat.

Now don't be adding more confusion!!! :D

bigmac
05-05-2006, 11:30 AM
I believe Jim@BAWS is as close to an authoritative opinion as anyone and he stated "light skiers" for the tow hook.

It's your boat, connect to either one, I'm sure both are strong enough.

Well, I'm sure he SELLS more boats than I do, but I'd sure be interested to know basis of his statement - did it come from observation of tow hooks being pulled out? Discussion with MasterCraft engineers?

atlfootr
05-05-2006, 11:45 AM
Well, I'm sure he SELLS more boats than I do, but I'd sure be interested to know basis of his statement - did it come from observation of tow hooks being pulled out? Discussion with MasterCraft engineers?No dout ...

bigmac
05-05-2006, 11:52 AM
Everybody is entitled to their opionon, mine differs from yours I guess.

Yeah, I certainly don't claim any greater expertise than you, I just have a different opinion. I'm fully prepared to be educated and persuaded otherwise, however...

I'm confident that tow hook damage from any reasonable towable activity will be covered under warranty, but I'd hate to damage my boat unnecessarily.

Hoff1
05-05-2006, 05:28 PM
I have a similar hook on both the bow and transom for my boat. But, they were designed for lifting. They have the lifting stickers on them, so I'd expect them to be a little more reinforced than the newer ones. The one in front is connected to a steel threaded rod that is about 1" thick, then connected to a fairly large plate if I remember. Strong enough to be towed by a sailboat.

Ric
05-05-2006, 05:48 PM
Hoff I speak for the group when I ask for a little better pic of sugarlips there on the sailboat... Thanks in advance..

Footin
05-05-2006, 05:51 PM
Towed in by a blow boat???? that had to hurt.

Hoff1
05-08-2006, 08:36 AM
Sorry, wish I had a better zoom lens.

Actually, I was just floating kicking back some suds and saving some gas. I've got two friends that have given up power boats for sailboats. To each his own...

Tom023
05-08-2006, 03:01 PM
I decided to give the "Ask Mastercraft" link on the home page a try and ask them about the rear tow hook suitability for watersports etc. and got this reply:

"I spoke with one of our head engineers about this subject and below is
his response:

The tow point on the transom rail is designed as an additional tow
point for skiers, tubing, etc. We have not tested it as a tow point to
pull another boat. It's also not designed for a vertical load like
parasailing.

I hope this helps.

Team MasterCraft Owner Relations Representative"

MC was very prompt in answering the question, providing a reply in two days, which seems to be better than a lot of companies.

rick s.
05-08-2006, 06:34 PM
I found the tow point on the transom really useful. We used it for holding the binding slime pump handle and for helping me get my fat b*** out of the water!

We also used for....tubes, early on in ownership

Ric
05-08-2006, 07:02 PM
I noticed yesterday that it's also a great grabrail for climbing in the boat which I've taken for granted... That said, I ordered mine with that towhook because it's not standard equip on a 197.. It's a towboat,I want all the towpoints I can get :D

skitilldark
05-09-2006, 12:12 AM
personally I use it for pulling my worn out old a$$ out of the water after a slalom run or two.

LakePirate
05-09-2006, 12:51 AM
When the rope is caught in the prop and you remove the swim platform (when serious surgery is required) it works great to hold on to in between trips underwater.

erkoehler
05-09-2006, 01:00 AM
Also helps to hold yourself under water when your trying to perform that surgery with a barefoot suit on.

Matt225
07-16-2010, 01:03 AM
Took a lot of fiberglass with it. At least I wasn't driving when this happened. Speed, slack and tubes don't play well together.
$8,800 for the repair.


http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/picture.php?albumid=296&pictureid=1790http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/picture.php?albumid=296&pictureid=1794

hbomb
07-16-2010, 01:29 AM
how on earth did you do that?

TLR67
07-16-2010, 09:04 AM
Towhook... Tube.... Slack..... Tighten.... Raining Fiberglass....... Ouch! I used to use mine for towing but not anymore after seeing that.... DAMN!!

psychobilly
07-16-2010, 09:20 AM
^^^^^ what he said!!!!

FrankSchwab
07-16-2010, 10:16 AM
All I have to say is...

"Owww!"

Seeing that is like watching some guy get kicked in the crotch - I felt like doubling over in pain in sympathy.

06197ttlq9-footer
07-16-2010, 11:34 AM
Reason 498 why friends don't let friends pull tubes. Seeing this I will never pull a tube....Goes well with my never having pulled a tube...I just don't have the experience to pull a tube....and if this is the experience...I am OUT! Nuthing like Jerking the A$$ out of your boat with a kids toy.

Luv2Ski
07-16-2010, 02:20 PM
My buddies kids have a lot of friends a few years ago. You can't teach all those kids how to ski and then give them any time on the water... just not enough hours in the day. When they were out at his cabin we very often pulled 10 tubes with a harness connected to the two transom lift hooks. Never a sign of damage with years of that use. Pulled 3 tubes or less from the standard tow hook - also never a sign of damage (and we did not pull light).

I am shocked a couple of tubes pulled out that hook - that had to be some huge slack!

At the risk of being virtually slapped, tubes are actually a lot of fun with the right group (course like all of you I would MUCH rather be on a board or ski). In those tubing years we got to the point that, with two tubers, we could take full-throttle corners on glass waters - only about %5 of the tube touched the water, would estimate we were braking 60mph.... Driver did have to be good to get the whip just right and to make certain the tubes did not pass the boat while exiting a corner (yes that is possible). We also jumped the tubes (frequently over other tubes/tubbers - up to 3 of them) and pulled barrel-roles, headstands, and other tricks. I use to wish there was competitive tubing, would have had a better chance than I do on a board or ski.

aremsing
07-16-2010, 04:42 PM
After seeing that picture tubes are a no go on my boat. Sorry to hear about that.
Just curious, how much slack and what kind of speed and weight were on those tubes. That seems like a lot of damage.
Again that sucks to look at

Matt225
07-16-2010, 05:25 PM
We were using a BIG tube--three adults and a kid. Since I was on the tube, and not driving (never again) not sure how fast it was going when the slack ran out; but the boat was accelerating while we sat dead still. At first I thought the rope broke--I was looking away at the time and only heard the "POP." As the boat came back to get us, reality set in with cries of "Oh My God!" and "don't let him see it!" coming from the passengers.

I had no idea the bill would be as big as it is, but they have to pull the motor and replace the whole transom down to the deck. On the bright side, I bought a new blower fan and hadn't installed it yet. It'll be much easier to get to it now!

joecarew3
07-17-2010, 12:10 AM
That just sounds like a can of driver error. Like hooking you boat up to a tree with a bunch of slack and gunning it... That's why I don't let anyone drive that I haven't trained and feel 100% confident in. That is a hard lesson well learned.

Footin
07-17-2010, 12:20 AM
Thats gonna take alot of duct tape.