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Farmer Ted
04-29-2006, 01:30 PM
Fiberglass filler?

Epoxy?

Fill it with what and then redrill?

Farmer Ted
04-29-2006, 01:31 PM
left side.....

Farmer Ted
04-29-2006, 01:33 PM
right side is over 1/2" deep
left is under 1/2" deep

grrrrrr

JohnnyB
04-29-2006, 01:36 PM
Those look like the screw holes for one of your access panels, correct?

Even though I haven't tried it, I would think filling it with 2 part expoxy and redrilling would be the best bet......hopefully someone has already solved this problem and can chime in with a solution based on a good experience....i'll be watchin this one.... :D

Farmer Ted
04-29-2006, 01:50 PM
Those look like the screw holes for one of your access panels, correct?

Even though I haven't tried it, I would think filling it with 2 part expoxy and redrilling would be the best bet......hopefully someone has already solved this problem and can chime in with a solution based on a good experience....i'll be watchin this one.... :D


yes, they're the holes that down the panel the motor box pivots on

I noticed one pulled up a bit the last time we went out and took the box off this morning.....

east tx skier
04-29-2006, 01:55 PM
I'd say marine epoxy. Unless you think it might crack underneath it?

Farmer Ted
04-29-2006, 01:56 PM
I'd say marine epoxy. Unless you think it might crack underneath it?

I just want to secure the screws and prevent any water intrusion

east tx skier
04-29-2006, 01:58 PM
On my windshield, I dabbed the screws in a bunch of silicone sealant. That way they don't get hung up.

dichdoc
04-29-2006, 04:41 PM
On my 84 I've been replacing stripped screw holes with Stainless "t" nuts (the nail on type)and epoxy. I've done it to the access panels, and gas tank pabel I then replace the screws with machine screws. My engine box is through bolted through the rear panel. Maybe you could fill the area with epoxy and filler drill out for T nuts and epoxy them in? TB

Workin' 4 Toys
04-29-2006, 08:53 PM
Resin(mix), and fiber mesh. Usually available at most hobby shops, paint supply shops, and sometimes autoparts stores. Just my :twocents:

Thrall
05-18-2006, 07:55 PM
Looks like there's enough exposed 'glass to bond well w/ some epoxy and then just redrill. If you can drill thru and bolt it w/ a backer plate or washer, would prevent it from ever happening again I think.

Kell
05-18-2006, 08:08 PM
You might also consider using some Marine-Tex. I just finished using some Marine-Tex and Gel-coat patch repair to fill in two 3/4" holes on the back of my Maristar 210. I removed some brackets that were used to support two braces for an extended pylon on a V-drive. Can't even tell there were the holes where. These holes were clear through the gel and fiberglass. Marine-Tex was like a soft putty and after a couple of hours it was hard as a rock. You can drill it, sand it, paint it, etc... Got it at West Marine.

Farmer Ted
05-18-2006, 08:21 PM
You might also consider using some Marine-Tex. I just finished using some Marine-Tex and Gel-coat patch repair to fill in two 3/4" holes on the back of my Maristar 210. I removed some brackets that were used to support two braces for an extended pylon on a V-drive. Can't even tell there were the holes where. These holes were clear through the gel and fiberglass. Marine-Tex was like a soft putty and after a couple of hours it was hard as a rock. You can drill it, sand it, paint it, etc... Got it at West Marine.

Thanks Kell!

I might try and buy some of that stuff. I just got some marine epoxy and filled them up and redrilled the holes. In the future I might add a set of holes on each side of the piece of floor so that 4 screws hole it in versus 2.

pilot02
05-18-2006, 08:26 PM
I agree with W4T and I've done enough fibreglas repair using both the traditional and epoxy.
Epoxy's great in certain instances (easier to work with and clean up) but if the screws did that damage already, Epoxy is not going to hold them properly. It's softer, lighter, and more flexible than polyester resin.
Get a small can of polyester resin and a little bit of fiberglass mat. Put Duct tape (protection) a little ways out from the repair area and sand/grind the area to be repaired. Retape the area and then cut pieces of mat into 2x2 squares, mix some resin, and dip the mat into the resin, then pack it into the area to be repaired pushing as much of the material into the void while removing all of the air bubbles. You don't want to see the white mat, it should turn translucent if done properly. (epoxy brush would work well for small repairs like this), let it dry, grind/sand it down, redrill. Put a little silicone on the screws if you want when you install them and that's it.
Shouldn't ever have to touch it again.