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Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 12:39 AM
Give me all you got.

erkoehler
04-12-2006, 12:41 AM
Start with on a lake, with no village ordinances....

6ballsisall
04-12-2006, 12:42 AM
10 car garage w/ 10' tall doors and ability to have lifts to store cars second tier. ;)

erkoehler
04-12-2006, 12:46 AM
10 car garage w/ 10' tall doors and ability to have lifts to store cars second tier. ;)


Might as well make it 50 feet deep as well :) So you can leave the truck hooked to the boat :D

6ballsisall
04-12-2006, 12:50 AM
Well its all agreed, the garage is the most important area and needs the most focus. :D

Easy access to your garaged boat house from the main garage is a big plus.

bigmac
04-12-2006, 01:58 AM
Plenty of internal wiring with CAT 6 cabling, coax (RG59 or preferably RG6) and digital fiber - all rooms - to a central closet. Make sure there is direct conduit access to the outside cable/phone drop from that closet so that you can easily change the main line into your room distribution panel. Today, it will likely be RG6. In 5 years, it will probably be optical fiber.

If you're talking about building a house in a location where the winters are cold, strongly consider iin-floor radiant heating (http://www.wirsbo.com/index.php?id=1) . You will still need ductwork for air conditioning, though.

milkmania
04-12-2006, 03:06 AM
safe room in said garage

Leroy
04-12-2006, 08:34 AM
Go up a size on all framing material, 2x6 walls instead of 2x4's etc.

Circulating hot water loop to distant faucets or get instant on unit.

I would not run ethernet cable and just use WiFi.

Get the best windows (Pella around here)

Really do your homework in picking a builder and really go through the contract verifying allowances etc.

Build a great bar and media room.

Put bathroom for every bedroom, only adds a small cost at building time.

We have built twice and loved both times!

ntidsl
04-12-2006, 08:39 AM
Always have a double door opening...that way you can get new couches bed frames etc...in with no problem...we have double door opening in the basement, first floor and on the master bed wing...

if you dont want maintenance dont do decks!!! figure a ways to do just patios, I prefer pavers but some like the satined concrete, I just worry about cracks in concrete.

I live in Northern KY and my most expensive gas and electric bill was $102 and that was Decemeber because of all the Christmas lights...get a good free standing wood stove if you are in a cold region...not a fireplace, they suck! Its has to be a good stove!!!

Althought I love my tall windows, my great room has 28 foot ceilings, cleaning the windows sucks!!! I won't do this on my next house!

Have the builder grade your land continuously during buiding...this is very important...Don't let him wait too long...Everything on the outside will turn out better is the grade is really close to the final grade throughout construction...

Sod, dont even bother seeding!!!!

ski_king
04-12-2006, 08:46 AM
My guess is you are going to have a seperate garge for all you toys, so just a nice sized 2 car attached garage for the daily drivers.

If you are designing your own floorplan, think furniture locations when you layout the location of windows and doors in the bedroom.

Building it energy effecient is a given, but you may want to consider adding a chimney for a pellet stove or wood stove to possibly use in the future if heating costs continue to get out of hand.

I would recommend composite decking for any decks. I am not a fan of concrete.

mitch
04-12-2006, 09:13 AM
huge main house, at least 5500 sq. feet. Walk out basement with a smaller garage door. lot and lots of skylights. I've got 8 and I wish I had more

BeavenX5
04-12-2006, 10:17 AM
4 small tips:
1- tall garage ceiling to be able to build a mezzanine. You can then store away all the seasonal stuff and keep a relatively clean garage.
2- stairway from garage to basement (if you have a small shop downstairs).
3- empy tube (PVC 3" pipe) inside wall going from basement to main floor and from main floor to second floor or even the roof attic. You never know when you will need to pass new wires between floors (as mention by bigmac you might want fiber optic cabling in a few years)
4- Probably the most inportant one (specially for my wife): Orientation of main rooms and windows towards the south-west for best sun light. It makes winters a lot easier.

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 10:23 AM
Start with on a lake, with no village ordinances....
NOT this one, that is in the works through, I assure you of that. Now if I could just keep my hobby projects to a minimum, I would be that much closer...;)

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 10:27 AM
10 car garage w/ 10' tall doors and ability to have lifts to store cars second tier. ;)
I want it to LOOK normal.

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 10:31 AM
Might as well make it 50 feet deep as well :) So you can leave the truck hooked to the boat :D
No winking smilie here...

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 10:38 AM
Well its all agreed, the garage is the most important area and needs the most focus. :D

Easy access to your garaged boat house from the main garage is a big plus.
THAT IS the number 1 reason for considering the move again. The current location will not allow me to build another structure on my lot. They implimented rules after we starting building this one. They only allow a certain % of the yard to be built on. I the past few years I built the 40' X 16' cedar deck, 40' X 12' concrete patio, 20' X 8' side drive, and the 14' X 12' shed, and 16' X 16' playset take up most of that % allowable. So I can not build the 60'X40' TOY SHACK I want. (Ok so the 60X40 is a dream, but you get the idea) And no knocking all the other stuff down will not work, so don't suggest it.
The next house will have the boat house, this one will not be near tha lake.

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 10:43 AM
Plenty of internal wiring with CAT 6 cabling, coax (RG59 or preferably RG6) and digital fiber - all rooms - to a central closet. Make sure there is direct conduit access to the outside cable/phone drop from that closet so that you can easily change the main line into your room distribution panel. Today, it will likely be RG6. In 5 years, it will probably be optical fiber.

If you're talking about building a house in a location where the winters are cold, strongly consider iin-floor radiant heating (http://www.wirsbo.com/index.php?id=1) . You will still need ductwork for air conditioning, though.
I considered in floor heat in the garage and basement. We shall see.

Now onto the cabling. I guess I will have to throw away that 1000' roll of CAT5e huh..:cry:
I have a 1000' of RG6 already, so I am good there, and considering the cable modems are most common here, I am probably set. And not to mention, I would think wireless is my best option, do I really need that many cables?

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 10:45 AM
safe room in said garage
As I mentioned already, garage space is at a premium here. HOWEVER, It will have a good size basement.
Anyone know what is "Required" to have in an indoor shooting range? I'd love to convert the basement one day.

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 10:51 AM
Go up a size on all framing material, 2x6 walls instead of 2x4's etc.
Circulating hot water loop to distant faucets or get instant on unit.
I would not run ethernet cable and just use WiFi.
Get the best windows (Pella around here)
Really do your homework in picking a builder and really go through the contract verifying allowances etc.
Build a great bar and media room.
Put bathroom for every bedroom, only adds a small cost at building time.
We have built twice and loved both times!
The builder is selected.
Bar and media room will probably be the basement, and that will be done later(much). I'd like to think I am going to do the project screen style with the projector in the ceiling, but we shall see. I know the picture isn't perfect, but beats even flat screens on space.

bcampbe7
04-12-2006, 10:58 AM
I considered in floor heat in the garage and basement. We shall see.

Now onto the cabling. I guess I will have to throw away that 1000' roll of CAT5e huh..:cry:
I have a 1000' of RG6 already, so I am good there, and considering the cable modems are most common here, I am probably set. And not to mention, I would think wireless is my best option, do I really need that many cables?


You can use your CAT5e without issues. It is good for Gig speeds up to 100m. :cool:

Take a look at this website. It has some pretty neat gadgets.

www.smarthome.com

The reason for all the cable is for future use. In the not-so-distant future we will be able to connect everything in our homes to a network. Our refrigerator will relay information to a centralized server in the house for diagnostoc purposes. Your frig will also order milk when it senses you are almost out.
The implementation of IPv6 will allow all this to happen fairly seemlessly.

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 10:58 AM
if you dont want maintenance dont do decks!!! figure a ways to do just patios, I prefer pavers but some like the satined concrete, I just worry about cracks in concrete.
get a good free standing wood stove if you are in a cold region...not a fireplace, they suck! Its has to be a good stove!!!
The exterior I am not worried about, I will leave that until last.
On the fireplace, we have one now(gas) and it isn't efficient at all. We use is often.
Aren't wood stoves high maintenance. I also considered one for the garage, but we aren't around alot and they seem to need alot of attention. Do you have a particular unit to suggest?

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 11:01 AM
You can use your CAT5e without issues. It is good for Gig speeds up to 100m. :cool:

Take a look at this website. It has some pretty neat gadgets.

www.smarthome.com (http://www.smarthome.com/)

The reason for all the cable is for future use. In the not-so-distant future we will be able to connect everything in our homes to a network. Our refrigerator will relay information to a centralized server in the house for diagnostoc purposes. Your frig will also order milk when it senses you are almost out.
The implementation of IPv6 will allow all this to happen fairly seemlessly.
JEEZ, and I used to be impressed when I could get our old remote control door bell to work once in awhile...:rolleyes:

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 11:02 AM
Does anyone have CELLULOSE insulation in their entire home?

BeavenX5
04-12-2006, 11:13 AM
I forgot to give you 2 great ideas my builder gave me for my home theater room. These ideas were taken from the house he build for Martin Brodeur on a nearby lake (he has a Mastercraft if the rumor is true).

1- build an elevated floor in the back of the room to allow to put a second row of seats theater style.
2- build a cabinet inside the wall for your sound system that has glass door in the front and a back door in an other room to access all the wires. The back door could be inside the "under stairs room" or like me in the adjacent bath room. The back of the sound system cabinet in the bathroom looks just like a regular additional bathroom cabinet only with a surprise if a guess opens it.

Don't forget to use multiple different sound insulation materials in you home theater ceiling as some materials are good for low frequencies and other are good for high frequencies. Let me know if you need advice on this as i beleive I did an amaizing sound insulation job on mine.

#47of100TeamMC
04-12-2006, 11:16 AM
We just built in Hudson WI (20miles east of St.Paul MN) used Insulated Concrete forms for the basement foundation. Excellent R- value sandwiches the 8" poured walls in 2.5" of styrofoam. Plan on this when drawing up your construction plans, as if you don't your 8" foundation now just grew to 13" and since you need to hold your outside dimensions for floor trusses/roof trusses etc. you will loose about 10" of interior space you didn't plan on loosing. We also did in-floor radiant heating "wirsbo" in the basement Best thing we ever did. with we would have done that in the upstairs too. and garage. But plan on adding it to the shed plans for next spring.

LakePirate
04-12-2006, 11:19 AM
Don't know how tall your family is, but we (me and wife) are taller and will have higher counter tops in the next house, espically in the bathrooms.

Dam Beau - I was going to try and score the box of Cat5


Hey Beaven - Wouldn't you run into issues with steam getting into the cabinet and causing trouble with the electronics?

#47of100TeamMC
04-12-2006, 11:20 AM
As far as the efficiency goes with the ICF's and the 2x6" exterior walls, we also had our insulation guys blow a R-60 in our attic, this January I have our programmable stat set to heat up to 66degrees in the morning and shut down to 55 during the day, turn back up to 64 at 3pm. I got home a little early from work one january afternoon, and happend to glance at the stat at about 2:45. and the house temp was still 63. I only lost 3degrees of heat inside over about a 9hr period. and the temp outside that day was in the teens. It's worth the extra 400$ it cost to add the additional insulation in the attic. I'm sure that already paid for itself after the first winter in the house.

#47of100TeamMC
04-12-2006, 11:25 AM
Yes, we also put higher counter tops in our master bathroom, The standard Kitchen countertop height is 36" Put the same height in your bathroom. I'm 5'10" and my wife is only 5'2. and she loves it just the same as I do.

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 11:31 AM
I did a little reading on this subject. I have an idea, but keep in mind, the lot has NOT been purchased, there is NO signed contracts, there are no plan agreements. And this entertainment system would be built myself in the basement of the house, that may not be started for a few months, then take 4 months to build, then the move in process... and then about a year to recoup my thoughts of why I built such a place I can't afford.... And then the basement project we are talking about here may get started. So in other words, I am jumping into the ES WAY ahead of time. But good tips, we shall discuss further in the future.



I forgot to give you 2 great ideas my builder gave me for my home theater room. These ideas were taken from the house he build for Martin Brodeur on a nearby lake (he has a Mastercraft if the rumor is true).

1- build an elevated floor in the back of the room to allow to put a second row of seats theater style.
2- build a cabinet inside the wall for your sound system that has glass door in the front and a back door in an other room to access all the wires. The back door could be inside the "under stairs room" or like me in the adjacent bath room. The back of the sound system cabinet in the bathroom looks just like a regular additional bathroom cabinet only with a surprise if a guess opens it.

Don't forget to use multiple different sound insulation materials in you home theater ceiling as some materials are good for low frequencies and other are good for high frequencies. Let me know if you need advice on this as i beleive I did an amaizing sound insulation job on mine.

#47of100TeamMC
04-12-2006, 11:33 AM
Another tip... that your probably already know... Build as BIG as you can afford. You won't be sorry.

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 11:34 AM
Yes, we also put higher counter tops in our master bathroom, The standard Kitchen countertop height is 36" Put the same height in your bathroom. I'm 5'10" and my wife is only 5'2. and she loves it just the same as I do.
Already in the plans, at least for the Master Bath anyway. I still can't figure out why they don't just do it that way to begin with. The shorter ones should be the "Optional".

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 11:36 AM
Another tip... that your probably already know... Build as BIG as you can afford. You won't be sorry.
I hear that, believe me, we are going to stretch the almighty dollar.
I have always said, get what you want, not what you can afford, it's the american way...;)

tex
04-12-2006, 11:39 AM
I've said this before but it makes a huge difference. As you progress through the building process. Have different people walk your house and look for mistakes. You will be looking at it alot and will start to miss obvious things. Trust me, I did and I used to frame.

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 11:45 AM
I've said this before but it makes a huge difference. As you progress through the building process. Have different people walk your house and look for mistakes. You will be looking at it alot and will start to miss obvious things. Trust me, I did and I used to frame.
I just wish I had the time to be the GC. I know exactly what it takes, and I just don't have the time. And I will be the inspector, whether or not they agree to make repairs as I see fit, now that is where things could get interesting. I certainly would not want to work for me...:D

tex
04-12-2006, 11:47 AM
I'm just saying, you will be shocked at the things you can miss..no matter how anal you are. It never hurts to let someone else look. Good luck and enjoy!

bcampbe7
04-12-2006, 11:52 AM
Dam Beau - I was going to try and score the box of Cat5



Sorry man! :D

#47of100TeamMC
04-12-2006, 11:54 AM
I hear that, believe me, we are going to stretch the almighty dollar.
I have always said, get what you want, not what you can afford, it's the american way...;)


We sat down before the whole process started and made a list of things we absolutely had to have... and if the cost gets too much, cut otherthings before cutting these. I would suggest that too. We were really happy with the results after brainstorming and writing things down that we really wanted to incorporate. our list kind of went like this:

-Rambler Only
-In-floor heat basement
-Electric heated floor in bathrooms
-36" counters in Master bath
-Glass bock shower Master bath
-2 shower heads in Master Bath shower
-whirlpool (put in a 60" should have been bigger)
-Cambria countertops
-Walk in closets in EVERY bedroom
-no bi-fold doors for closets
-Dual zone heating/cooling (seperate stat for basement and upstairs)
-Fiber Cement Siding...(which carried into Maintenance free Exterior as a whole)
-Knock down ceiling texture
-Race track ceiling in master Bed(layered sheetrock cheaper than tray ceiling, and we like the looks of it better)
-Stainless appliances (double ovens, Gas cooktop)
-Central Vacuum
-Maple cabinets
-Hickory hardwood floors
...etc.

You get the idea.

BeavenX5
04-12-2006, 11:55 AM
[QUOTE=Hey Beaven - Wouldn't you run into issues with steam getting into the cabinet and causing trouble with the electronics?[/QUOTE]

We don't have steam issues as this is only a basement bathroom/laundryroom and their are no showers or bath installed (only roughed under flooring). I guess if we ever install a shower (not likely), I would have to put a little insulation around the edges of the cabinet door and a bigger exhaust fan.

In my particular case, the back of the cabinet is inside a bathroom, but you can use this idea in any other room. The best would obviously be in a storage place like under the stairs.

The main disadvantage of this set-up is that it creates a way for the sound to exit the room. Other than through the cabinet, the room is sound proof. If I was to rebuild this cabinet, I would make it 1 1/2" thicker and add sound insulation inside the back door. It is now a bit too tight to add insulation inside.

east tx skier
04-12-2006, 12:00 PM
While we're spitballing, (1) have doors on each end of the garage so you can drive the boat straight in instead of backing in, (2) Central Kegeratory with a manifold to multiple lines and taps all over the house.

ski_king
04-12-2006, 12:02 PM
Insulate interior bedroom walls for sound.

#47of100TeamMC
04-12-2006, 12:06 PM
Insulate interior bedroom walls for sound.

I'll 2nd that! Especially around the Interior bathroom walls. Never fun to hear somebody showering or taking a deuce.

M-Funf
04-12-2006, 12:50 PM
As I mentioned already, garage space is at a premium here. HOWEVER, It will have a good size basement.
Anyone know what is "Required" to have in an indoor shooting range? I'd love to convert the basement one day.

I was looking into the same thing a while back. It really depends on your local laws. We are "legally" not allowed to discharge a firearm inside the city limits :(

That said, if a tree falls down in the forest and nobody is around to hear it, does it make a sound? :rolleyes:

My uncle down in LA had an indoor range under his house. Extremely well sound dampened...

Mancom does design and installation.

Mancom (http://www.mancomsystems.com/index.cfm)

They might be able to help out...

There might also be some books available at Amazon???

phecksel
04-12-2006, 12:50 PM
Make sure enough wiring is run for speakers.

I double the Cat 5, because you never know. I have mixed used wired and wireless. Wired definitely to my main computer, as it also serves as a file server.

Biggest garage allowable, and can you request variance? Variances are always granted in our city, in spite of city management trying to stop them.

Walk out basement, in my old house, steps led to garage

In home theater room, double drywall thickness.

Whole house electric surge protection

Wire for whole house standby generator

Consider cement construction instead of sticks. I was looking at it, when I was considering building. Much better insulation, sound and temperature.

#47of100TeamMC
04-12-2006, 12:54 PM
Along with the Complete Concrete Construction, You could instal a Geo-Thermal Heating/cooling system... But that might require you to actually walk outside once and a while and wrap your arms around a Good size oak Tree and give it a big bear hug!

#47of100TeamMC
04-12-2006, 12:55 PM
I just had to add one more post to see if I can loose this "newbie" status. I heard at 30 it's gone... am I now a regular?

(sorry for the thread jack and waste of space.)

Ric
04-12-2006, 03:15 PM
I just had to add one more post to see if I can loose this "newbie" status. I heard at 30 it's gone... am I now a regular?

(sorry for the thread jack and waste of space.)
well at least now you are regular ;)

ski_king
04-12-2006, 03:42 PM
Keep it up out of the flood plain.

Also you may want a hurricane/tornado safe room.

Leroy
04-12-2006, 04:03 PM
Wiring and controls for built in ceiling speakers in all the rooms you want spreakers.

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 04:57 PM
Oh yea, I could just see the permit application for this.....:rolleyes: I suppose I will drop the subject for now, I may explore the idea again at a later time, I idea is getting carried away with now.:eek:



Mancom does design and installation.

Mancom (http://www.mancomsystems.com/index.cfm)

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 04:58 PM
Wiring and controls for built in ceiling speakers in all the rooms you want spreakers.
If they made the Sound dock any more useful, it would be outlaw'd!!

Kevin 89MC
04-12-2006, 05:24 PM
WFT, I applaud your realistic approach to GC'ing it. I've thought about building, and I just don't think I could hire it out. I'm just too stubborn. You're a wiser man than I. :) I know how you feel about "inspecting" and share your thoughts. I pity the poor builder you hire!
My :twocents: : conduit to every room for running the latest & greatest wiring as it changes, ICF for the foundation, in-floor radiant heat, maybe geothermal heating with gas prices where they are (and likely where they're going). Tankless hot water heaters. Maybe two of the "small" ones. There's a great tax incentive for those right now as well. I'll put in a plug for Eagle Window. IMHO they are the best, and not too much more than the other good ones. Actually Andersen just purchased them as their "premium line". Prices are not that much more than the Anderen 400 series. I'll be buying them for my house soon.
Oh yeah, the most important space - that sucks about 900 SF max! My dream is a 3-1/2 car wide X double deep. Oh well.
Good luck!

sassydog
04-12-2006, 06:15 PM
Go up a size on all framing material, 2x6 walls instead of 2x4's etc.

Circulating hot water loop to distant faucets or get instant on unit.

I would not run ethernet cable and just use WiFi.

Get the best windows (Pella around here)

Really do your homework in picking a builder and really go through the contract verifying allowances etc.

Build a great bar and media room.

Put bathroom for every bedroom, only adds a small cost at building time.

We have built twice and loved both times!

not to pick on you Leroy, but 2x6 is really unneccesary unless you have 2 story balloon walls or an insane amount of brick/stone facade, or if you live inthe arctic and need a ton of insulation. speaking of insulation, don't by windows that are R 80 if the walls are only R 40. invest in some solid windows, but if theres a dramatic difference in the windows vs. the wall insulation in their R value, you need to change one or the other. I've been a union carpenter for quite a few years, so i have a pretty go idear, as to how a house should get built: which brings me to my next point. Use a Union Contractor, they'll beat anyone else around.

Leroy
04-12-2006, 09:32 PM
No problem Sassydog, it's all a good discussion! I can tell you living in it there was a big difference on how the house felt (all boards one size up, floor, everything) no bouncing floor, quieter, lower heating/cooling bills, figured since WFT was in Chicago would make more difference. It was all brick, great house, built 2400 sq ft for $104k in 1988!



not to pick on you Leroy, but 2x6 is really unneccesary unless you have 2 story balloon walls or an insane amount of brick/stone facade, or if you live inthe arctic and need a ton of insulation. speaking of insulation, don't by windows that are R 80 if the walls are only R 40. invest in some solid windows, but if theres a dramatic difference in the windows vs. the wall insulation in their R value, you need to change one or the other. I've been a union carpenter for quite a few years, so i have a pretty go idear, as to how a house should get built: which brings me to my next point. Use a Union Contractor, they'll beat anyone else around.

6ballsisall
04-12-2006, 09:35 PM
FWIW 2x6 construction is a very minimal increase over standard 2x6 construction and provides many good benefits, one including the amount of insulation you can get into a wall. If you are going to keep the house for a while the cost increase of the 2x6 construction will be much less than the savings you'll get in the form of energy savings. It's a good investment, especially in cooler climates.

6ballsisall
04-12-2006, 09:37 PM
oh, my pet peeve, crappy subfloor work. Glued and screwed down using tongue and groove sheets. none of these dang screws and "dabs" of glue. Squeaky floors suck!!

6ballsisall
04-12-2006, 09:40 PM
That would be all fine and dandy, however, I don't need more than one lift.;) 10' tall doors I am already working on. 10 car garage is not an option:mad: . Unfortunetly for me there are MANY rules in place here, including one that Pi$$es me off to no end. I am only allowed 900 Square feet of floor area for garage. I am looking into seperate structures, but for now, I have a number to work with. (Keep in mind this is a residential area) and I don't intend to build a commercial building for storing toys. I want it to LOOK normal.

Dude, there's no such thing as to big of a garage. I asked a guy one time why he had a 12 car garage. He told me "because I have 12 cars" :uglyhamme

900 sq ft is awful small. Is the lot level or does it slope and provide for a walk out basement?

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 09:57 PM
Use a Union Contractor, they'll beat anyone else around.
What else is there...;)

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 10:02 PM
Dude, there's no such thing as to big of a garage. I asked a guy one time why he had a 12 car garage. ........................................

6ballsisall
04-12-2006, 10:03 PM
State law?? Thats pretty wild?? Wonder why that law was put together????

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 10:07 PM
FWIW 2x6 construction is a very minimal increase over standard 2x6 construction and provides many good benefits, one including the amount of insulation you can get into a wall. If you are going to keep the house for a while the cost increase of the 2x6 construction will be much less than the savings you'll get in the form of energy savings. It's a good investment, especially in cooler climates.
I think your second 2X" dimension was meant to be a "4". Either way, I will look into that option, however, as of now I am thinking of going with cellulose or foam insulation.
It get below zero a few times a year, but its the summer that will make a difference I think. It gets pretty nasty some times, and I like the thought of being able to "balance" the house temps. And not have hot/cold spots. We shall see.
It is on the "list" for 2X6 exterior walls.
(I might ask for 2X2 walls in the garage though, I could use every inch;) )

Workin' 4 Toys
04-12-2006, 10:08 PM
State law?? Thats pretty wild?? Wonder why that law was put together????
For People like me that would have a warehouse on the lot next to the "Outhouse" sized house.:D

6ballsisall
04-12-2006, 10:08 PM
(I might ask for 2X2 walls in the garage though, I could use every inch;) )


lol!! :uglyhamme

Kevin 89MC
04-13-2006, 12:56 AM
I'm surprised you're allowed 2X4 ext walls in Chcago. Up here in the frozen tundra I'm pretty sure 2X6 const is mandated, for insulation purposes. We're not that much farther north than you. IMHO I'd do it regardless. As stated previously, it will pay for itself rather quickly. Let me be the first to say, if you build it, post pics!

Workin' 4 Toys
04-13-2006, 12:08 PM
Well 2X6's should be required on the exterior, but you know as well as I do, if they "give" you 2X4 and I request 2X6, the contractor price of $400.00 in material upgrades is going to cost me $4000.00(guesstimated number), why would they ask for a change in the codes right?:rolleyes:
Not to mention, who else is going to push that, the towns that make $ off gas and electric sales.
Nah, why would they want me to save $200.00 a month in energy.....
Probably the same guys over at the automobile manufacturers that owns a couple fuel stations..:rolleyes:

twieder
04-13-2006, 11:02 PM
I 100% agree with the foam pannel basement forms! I've got a friend thet has been doing them around here for about 4 years now. He uses Owens Corning forms that a monkey could set!The nicest thing about it (other than insulation value) is the walls are ready to finish!(drywall) All the electrical gets notched into the foam and the ties that hold the pannels together are designed for drywall screws to attatch too!

Also consider a vented or ventless wall heater in the basement. It takes the chill outa a cold basement and is back up heat if the power goes out!

peason
04-14-2006, 09:39 AM
You can never have enough outlets!
Central vacuum system would be a good bet too!
Extra wide stair cases and doors.
9 foot basement ceiling.
Complete house wiring for stereo and surround sound theater.
Garage - the more space the better - measure fit for boat storage and height so you can get boat in without taking down the tower.

Leroy
04-14-2006, 10:07 AM
Pearson, you reminded me, make sure you have plenty or water faucets outside also.

SkiDog
04-14-2006, 10:46 AM
Yea, I've got cellulose in my whole house and I love it! We put it in between the 1st & 2nd floors and the sounds from upstairs bonus room almost can't be heard! Its by far the BEST sound proofing between floors you can put in. Except for prestressed concrete. As far as insulating quality, its a little better than batts, however, we do get a lot of dust in our house. Not sure if thats the cause or not. Its probally a little cheaper than batts these days too. If I had it to do over again I would probally use closed cell foam in my attic. Iceoyne is a good product, but you have to use a humidifier in the house. With foam, even the attic stays as cool as the rest of the house. Also, you don't have to vent ther roof or eves with foam.

6ballsisall
04-14-2006, 12:34 PM
What is the lot like W4T's? Many times that can depict the floorplan options you have to work with and house characteristics.

erkoehler
04-15-2006, 01:18 AM
Outlets on the exterior of the house....put them on there own circuit. That way, when the christmas lights go up you don't have to worry about blowing the breakers!

JohnnyB
04-15-2006, 03:46 PM
1) oversize all floor joists 1 size, glue and screw down all subflooring
2) wire chases (2" or larger conduit from basement to attic)....like others have said, media will continue to change and being able to pull in the new stuff is important
3) prewire for in-wall and in-ceilling speakers. Installing speakers after is a good do-it-yourself project. Take picture of all walls before they are drywalled so you can find the wires that were run and so that if you EVER need to chase anything in a wall in the future, you know what is where
4) Switched outlets in soffits for XMAS lights (I love this one)
5) Hot and cold water faucets in the garage
6) storage trusses and decking above garage even if you don't have a bonus room, you can use this area for storage
7) brick patios, no decks....an easy do-it yourself project
8) if you've got kids, a drop area for their coats, backpacks and other school stuff (a buddy of mine has an 8x8 room next to their entry door from the garage and this is sweet for this type of area)
9) recirc loops on hot water of tubs, showers, sinks
10) make your garage 10% larger than you think you need
11) if you are going to have a deck, have them pre-install the ledger board. That way it'll be all flashed, etc.
12) ENERGY STAR CERTIFICATION
13) even if your local codes don't warrent it, you want a whole house air-to-air exchanger....great for exhuasting bathrooms, kitchen, laundry room, etc and for moisture abatement
14) Stairs from garage to basement
15) exposed portion of basement for windows (if you have this, you have legal egress and this is considered in your liveable square footage....adds value to your home)
16) Insulation in all walls of: laundry room, bath rooms, master bedroom...really is sound insulation
17) non walk-in closet doors should open closet wall to closet wall so that you can get at all the space.....I added closet organizers to mine since we moved in and the ones that aren't this way don't allow for as good a use of all the space.


I'll try to think of more.....I asked the same questions of others before I built and have many of these items incorporated, but not all.

X45owner
04-15-2006, 06:24 PM
Alot of good info here, and I agree with all that's been said. A few things that have not been mentioned are RADIANT BARRIER ROOF, SOUND WALLS, and SOLAR POWERED HEATING COILS in the driveway and walkway. The radiant barrier roof is great here in socal. We rarely have to use the A/C. 8 surround speakers, 2 standing speakers and 2 powered sub woofers, can barely be heard in the adjoining room with sound walls installed. I didn't use the coils in the driveway, but I remeber them when I was researching radiant floor heating. Also, don't forget to home run all your CAT5 and RG6. If you are paying someone to do this make sure you specify this. A "normal" bid price will be daisy chained.

bobbyB
04-16-2006, 01:43 PM
I'm a residential Plans Examiner for the County and I look at house plans all day. Here's some of the better things I've seen/picked up on.
1- South facing covered porches. During summer when the angle of the sun is high, the porch blocks the the rays. During the winter when the sun is lower they allow the rays in providing warmth.
2- Put insulation (as a sound deadner) in the walls of the master bedroom/bathroom, laundry room, guest bathroom and the family/ tv room. Don't forget the ceiling and or floor.
3- Oversize your floor joist by at least one height size. Just because they say it can span that far doesn't mean it wont be bouncy!
4- Try to locate laundry rooms, dishwashers, and TV rooms away from the bedrooms. At least, try to get them away from the Master Suite!
5- If most or all of the bedrooms are upstairs, then locate your laundry room up there too!
6- DON'T BUY STORE BOUGHT/MAGAZINE PLANS! Trust me on this one. If you see a house you like, take the pic to a designer/architect and have them draw it up for you. This may cost you some coin up front, but it will most likely save you far more in the end. Many people say "take your time and find a good contractor" but this is the wrong approach. Back up one step. First find a good designer/architect, then ask them for a couple of recomendations for good contractors. Remember, you really do get what you pay for. Don't take the low ball bids, because it'll come back and bite you.

If you have any farther questions about building a house or the "building codes", PM me and I'll do my best to help. I hate to see people go down the wrong road b/c they don't know any better or b/c some jerk is trying to scam them.

B

twieder
04-16-2006, 02:31 PM
Another idea is a toilet,sink and or shower stall in the garage!It will take as little as 50sq ft,but is worth the time and space. Keeps all your buddies that stop for a beer or 5 from trapseing through the house to pee.The shower is nice when you're workin in the yard or, washing the dog!
I know I will never have a garage without!