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View Full Version : Another question from the noobie (steering pull)


hz900
03-27-2006, 02:44 PM
'92 PS 205

When I took the boat out for the first time I noticed that it has a pull to the right at all times. Is this something that can be fixed easily? It turns easily in either direction but if you let go of the steering wheel it will take a right hand turn.

bigmac
03-27-2006, 02:55 PM
'92 PS 205

When I took the boat out for the first time I noticed that it has a pull to the right at all times. Is this something that can be fixed easily? It turns easily in either direction but if you let go of the steering wheel it will take a right hand turn.

For the DD ski boats, that's pretty normal. There's always a little bit of right pull built in to the rudder to aid in steering stability through a slalom course. If you're not hitting the ski courses at all and find that right pull to be a pain (I would) then you can shape the rudder a little by sanding/filing down one rear edge of the rudder JUST A LITTLE. No doubt someone here will chime in with a more accurate description of this very simple rudder adjustment

hz900
03-27-2006, 02:59 PM
If you're not hitting the ski courses at all and find that right pull to be a pain (I would)


No ski courses in the future of this boat, just alot of lake fun and skiing/boarding/tubing. And yes I did find it a tad annoying so if its an easy fix, bring it on. If not an easy fix, its something I could easily live with.

richardsoncd
03-27-2006, 03:04 PM
I think you might find after a while the slight pull makes it easier to drive...it gives the steering wheel a bit more "firmness" plus it makes for a "straighter" pull if you are pulling a skier/wakeboarder...just my two cents. Congrats on the new boat.

Kevin 89MC
03-27-2006, 03:05 PM
First of all, welcome aboard. There are some extremely knowledgeable people here. You'll learn a ton. Some of it may actually help! Just kidding.
Someone may beat me to it, but the boats are usually set up for a "pull" by lightly tuning the trailing edge of the rudder. Check the past threads on this, there's been a bunch. East Texas Skier has a similar boat to yours, and has a nice picture of his rudder showing the filing necessary to create the pull. Most drivers find it helpful to have a little load on the steering when driving straight, especially in the slalom course. Mine's pretty neutral, as are the other boats I drive. Someday I'll have to drive one with a pull to see the difference. For open water skiing, and general cruising, you may want to set it up "neutral." This is easy, just file down the opposite edge of your ruddder. I've never done it, but others on here have. Apparently a little goes a long way, so start small. Good luck!

east tx skier
03-27-2006, 03:24 PM
Welcome, hz900. The picture of my rudder is in the FAQ under "My boat pulls to the right. Is this normal?"

hz900
03-27-2006, 05:03 PM
Welcome, hz900. The picture of my rudder is in the FAQ under "My boat pulls to the right. Is this normal?"

Thanks, thats a pretty informative list of stuff you have there, good reading for a new owner such as myself. I think I'll leave it. Makes sense that the boat might feel to loose if I 'corrected' it.

bkhallpass
03-27-2006, 05:12 PM
There is an article in this months waterski magazine which explains how to file the rudder to either create the pull or to eliminate it. BKH

BuoyChaser
07-01-2008, 09:18 AM
There is an article in this months waterski magazine which explains how to file the rudder to either create the pull or to eliminate it. BKH

here's the link to that article http://www.waterskimag.com/article.jsp?ID=12220

Torqued Out
By Staff (more by this author)

You power up in your friend's tournament boat and immediately feel something different. Your boat holds a straight course with hardly any effort, but the steering wheel in your buddy's boat pulls to the right, and if you let go of the wheel, the boat veers off course.
What you're experiencing is a difference in rudder torque, and your friend doesn't necessarily have a problem in his steering system. Rudder torque is a measure of the amount of directional steering system pressure generated by the rudder as it travels through the water. When operating a boat with significant rudder torque, the driver must apply greater steering pressure to counteract the directional "pull" of the steering system.
Generally, the amount of rudder torque varies among powerboats and can usually be adjusted to suit specific applications or driver preferences. While excessive rudder torque is unsafe and tiring to the driver, the positive pressure and "heavier" steering feel created from a "loaded" rudder are preferred in some skiing applications.
Tournament ski boats used for relatively short, straight runs through a slalom course generally benefit from more rudder torque. This pressure on the steering system provides the slalom driver with a frame of reference, helping him to lock into a straight course through the buoys and counteract the strong opposite lateral pull of the skier. This solid frame of reference becomes even more critical in world-class slalom skiing with shorter line lengths and tighter course tolerances.
For recreational skiing, boarding or cruising, though, this constant pressure on the steering wheel can become annoying and just plain tiring on the driver. In this case, a more neutral rudder, one that creates less torque and steering system pressure, tends to be more comfortable, more forgiving, and safer.
The hydrodynamic force of the water passing around the vertical hydrofoil that is the rudder creates torque. In most cases, rudder torque can be reduced or exaggerated by manipulating the surface and shape of the hydrofoil to change its hydrodynamics.
Flattening the right side of a rudder, for example, will increase a boat's tendency to pull to the right, while flattening the left side of the same rudder will reduce the right-hand pull.
In addition, all inboards have a natural tendency to pull left or right based on the direction of prop rotation. This is known as prop torque. Grinding a rudder to pull in the opposite direction of prop torque
is not recommended, as it generally has an adverse effect on both steering performance and wake characteristics.
Since rudder tuning is not an exact science, it should be performed by a trained professional and through a gradual process of trial and error. The rudder shape is carefully altered by grinding; then the steering is tested on-water to see if additional adjustment is needed.
"Most high-quality rudders are manufactured with a precise, symmetrical hydrofoil shape," says Charlie Pigeon, president of Tigi Boats. "But just like propellers, we lake-test every one to make sure, and sometimes we find one that needs some tuning." Because Tigi boats are designed for versatility, Pigeon says, they have relatively neutral steering. "A loaded rudder can create some tired arms at the end of a day on the lake, so we go with the two-finger steering approach."
Pigeon adds that customer preference, however, comes first, so if rudder torque is requested, Tigi will make the necessary modifications.
"It's really a matter of taste and how you use your boat. If you're in the slalom course all day pulling a serious skier competing at a world-class level, a boat with a heavier rudder is definitely beneficial. More neutral steering would be a handicap in this case. But if you're cruising, towing boarders or most skiers, you probably don't want to be fighting the steering wheel all day. The important thing is that rudder torque can be easily modified to fit your needs, but it should only be done by someone who knows what they are doing."

gigem75
07-01-2008, 05:29 PM
my 83 PS19 was pulling to the right considerably at speed. I ground a slight amount off the left trailing edge of the rudder and it made a world of difference. Still a slight pull to the right but I like that, just slight pressure with the knee on the wheel will keep it straight hands off wheel. Before you'd best be ready to mash your knee on the wheel to hold it straight. The method described above works.