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flipper
03-18-2006, 11:31 PM
I know there are about 2 million threads on impellers, and just got done reading most of them. I just replaced mine and did the rest of the dewinterizing today, and fired up the boat. It won't suck the water from the fake-a-lake. It will suck the water fine through the intake hose of the water pump though. Checked all the places I could think of and nothing is clogged. Any suggestions. Scared to put the boat on the water, and have it not able to suck water. Thanks. :confused:

Sodar
03-19-2006, 12:03 AM
I know there are about 2 million threads on impellers, and just got done reading most of them. I just replaced mine and did the rest of the dewinterizing today, and fired up the boat. It won't suck the water from the fake-a-lake. It will suck the water fine through the intake hose of the water pump though. Checked all the places I could think of and nothing is clogged. Any suggestions. Scared to put the boat on the water, and have it not able to suck water. Thanks. :confused:
How is it sucking from the intake hose? Did you use the bucket method? I personally hate the fake-a-lake plunger, I can never seem to get it to seal right. If there are no clogs, then maybe you can pump up the water pressure on the gadren hose and get it to prime the hose a little better...

flipper
03-19-2006, 12:17 AM
I just put the garden hose in the intake hose. I could feel it trying to suck more water at high idle, which makes me think it is fine, but not sure. At low idle the garden hose keeps up with the pump fine though. I was thinking about doing the bucket method tomorrow though, if it sucks from a bucket, it should from a lake right?

Sodar
03-19-2006, 12:18 AM
Yeah, if it sucks from a bucket you should be fine as long as your thru-hull and intake grate is clear of debris.

flipper
03-19-2006, 12:22 AM
Thanks for the help, always feels safer coming from somebody other than me.

ski_king
03-19-2006, 12:32 AM
I think the bucket methods works best. Even at idle my hose cant keep up with the intake of the pump.

Sodar
03-19-2006, 12:49 AM
Wow, I have never had a problem with the hose keeping up. I just use the bucket because I like to watch it suck the water with my own two eyes, rather than shoving the hose down the intake's throat.

flipper
03-19-2006, 01:00 AM
At my old house the water pressure was low, so I use to run it at my friends who had better water pressure. This house, the hose keeps up fine though.

Sodar
03-19-2006, 01:06 AM
Yeah, I feel ya there. Our vacation house has HORRIBLE pressure. Our next door neighbor tapped into the fire hydrant line and ran 2 inch line to his house! I love borrowing his water to wash down the deck, it is like holding onto a 2" firehose!!

flipper
03-19-2006, 01:10 AM
That's great, he tapped into the fire hydrant! Seems like you could get busted for that. Good idea though.

Sodar
03-19-2006, 01:19 AM
He probably could, he has had good luck so far!

JohnnyB
03-19-2006, 12:16 PM
I have a well with reasonably good pressure. However, when I use my fake-a-lake, my wife and daughters get specific instructions that no major water consumers get turned on in the house (wash machine, shower, etc). Just a precaution....seems to keep up OK.

Love the fire hydrant idea.....what the heck does a guy need to waste money on a pressure washer for??? :woohoo:

JimN
03-19-2006, 01:10 PM
If you want to run it without having to worry about others using water in the house, get a 20 gallon garbage can (plastic) and fill it before running the motor. It'll let you go to higher RPM without running out as fast and when you idle, it may refill if the water flow/pressure is high enough. I have never been a fan of Fake a lake because it relies on a good seal with the hull, which is hard to get when someone is in the boat moving around. The position of the cup can also change once the water is turned on.

Hoff1
03-20-2006, 09:11 AM
Does anyone know what the water flow rate would be for a water pump at idle, specifically a Johnson off of an Indmar 351 from 1990. I was wanting to check mine to see if it is providing the proper flow rate. I was thinking it was 2 gpm or 5 gpm, or something similar. Anyone know?

JimN
03-20-2006, 10:43 AM
Look at 2 gallons of milk and think about how much cooling it would do. 10 would be closer to the right number and I think that would be low, too. At the first dealer I worked for, we had a bottle from a water cooler with a hole in it and if the hose was turned off, it didn't take long to drain it with a new impeller.

Leroy
03-20-2006, 10:48 AM
Mine sucked up 5-6 gallons in about 20 seconds at idle with hose sitting in 5 gallon bucket and I poured another gallon in as it was sucking it up.

Hoff1
03-20-2006, 11:06 AM
[QUOTE=JimN]Look at 2 gallons of milk and think about how much cooling it would do. QUOTE]

Interesting reference. Check, I'll use 10 gallons of milk. I knew it did a body good, must be good for engines as well...

Thanks for the responses, I don't have running water at my storage building so I'll bring some jugs of water so I can run it for a minute or so. Just want to see if mine is sucking water very well.

east tx skier
03-20-2006, 11:15 AM
I think the bucket methods works best. Even at idle my hose cant keep up with the intake of the pump.

That's my opinion, too. From messages I've read of JimN's, I use this method almost exclusively. My boat will really drink the water out of a bucket. It has literally picked the fake a lake up off the ground. I just don't think the F-A-L can supply enough water (may be a pressure issue at my house).

Use the bucket. My :twocents:

JimN
03-20-2006, 12:32 PM
Actually, the method I really liked was at the last dealership where I had a plastic 50 gallon watering trough behind the boat and I could draw the water through the hose into the raw water pump, catch it as it came out the exhaust and recirculate it. It really kicked butt for winterizing since I was circulating anti-freeze with very little water in it. No doubt at all about having the right concentration of juice and with the thermostat opening from the hot liquid, it got into all parts of the motor.

I have suggested getting one of the tubs before, for people who have friends with boats. If the price is split for the tub, the hose and anti-freeze, the cost/person is really pretty low.

Yeah, I know- the dealers here are gonna hate me for telling people to do their own winterization, but there's no prize for spending the most as a boat owner, either.

east tx skier
03-20-2006, 12:45 PM
Yeah, Jim, I remember that. I don't have nearly enough friends to pull it off. :o

JimN
03-20-2006, 01:21 PM
I don't remember paying more than about $50 for the trough and even if you buy it for only your own use, it's a one-time purchase and could double as a pool for the newest addition to the family when old enough. Or a dog bath, etc (ice bath for hangovers or hey- for beer when you have a party). I think it was Rubbermaid.

jimmer2880
03-20-2006, 01:24 PM
.... No doubt at all about having the right concentration of juice and with the thermostat opening from the hot liquid, it got into all parts of the motor.
....

While your (the tub) method is absolutely better, I choose to pull my thermostat, start it up to su(k the anti-freeze, shut her off & re-install the T-stat. No worries here about not having enough anti-freeze passing through the t-stat.

east tx skier
03-20-2006, 03:35 PM
Well, since I don't do the a/f thing, I'm sticking to my 5 gallon bucket, hose, and flexible pvc tubing.

flipper
03-20-2006, 10:42 PM
Well far as I can tell, one of the hoses were not tight enough. The hose off the tranny cooler would suck, the one from the bottom of the boat wouldn't. Tightened everything one last time, 1/4 turn at the most, and everything worked fine. Now I worry that I messed up the impeller up figuring it out. It always got a little water, but not much. Didn't run even a minute at a time, but will probably get a new one just in case, and keep this one for a back up. Thanks for all the help guys. :worthy:

88 PS190
03-20-2006, 10:54 PM
i know some boat dealers who hate winterizing boats, because they get so busy.. maybe some like it.

JimN
03-20-2006, 11:46 PM
Flipper- if the hose was a bit loose and was sucking air, as long as some water got to the impeller, it should be OK unless the flow was interrupted completely. Replacing the impeller is good insurance, though, and you can keep the other one as a spare, or look at it first before deciding.

88- the dealers who hate winterizing have no clue. It's just another service they need to provide to their customers, no more and no less. If they think they have too many boats to work on in that time of year, they should either come up with a better system, hire more seasonal help, work longer hours or just turn people away and let them go to a dealer who actually wants to do this for the customers. I wanted to use a tub at the first dealership but they didn't want to. I went to the other place and they were already doing it that way and had realized that doing it as a production line kind of thing is the only way to get them all done before they freeze. It takes a lot less time to get anti-freeze into all of the areas of a motor if all that's being sucked in is anti-freeze and not running it on cold water, then trying to get the 'stat to open with 3-5 gallons of cold anti-freeze. The anti-freeze in a tub is being recirculated and stays warm or hot, depending on how many boats are done in a given time period. Makes it really easy to get the 'stat to open, even on a cold day. Being efficient during winterization can make a big difference in whether a business makes money or not. I would really hate for my business to make money. :twocents:

It's not the most comfortable thing to do in some parts of the country, though. Cold, wet hands, feet, face, getting rained and snowed on, lots of wind, gets dark early, too much to do and not enough time. Too bad. It's part of the territory and if a dealer thinks it's going to be all flowers and champagne, they need to open their eyes. Complaining about too many boats coming in is just stoooooopid. The last owner of the first dealership I worked for used to complain about having to go and get more oil and filters every day. OK, if he had to go out of his way or if we weren't charging for them, that would be one thing. The problem I had with him complaining is that we were making good money on every oil change and he was still biatching about it. WTH??????? :confused:


OK, I'm done now and I feel much better.

east tx skier
03-21-2006, 12:24 AM
Hey, Jim. Explain to me how you hook the boat up to the tub. Do you pull the hose off the intake or just have a long hose going from the tub to the transmission cooler or did I miss something?

JimN
03-21-2006, 12:59 AM
Right to the oil cooler, unless it's a newer model and then it goes to the raw water pump since it's ahead of the cooler. Vinyl tubing, available at HD, or whatever hardware store is close. I bought the tub at a local big box chain, but it's available at any place that sells farm equipment. The hose needs to be long enough so the tub can be placed behind the boat, so the water or anti-freeze can go out the exhaust, back into the tub. I put tape on the gunwale so it won't be scratched and tape the hose in place so it can't move.

east tx skier
03-21-2006, 11:50 AM
That sounds like what I use. I think it was called clear, flexible, pvc, tubing.

I just detach the hose from the tranny cooler and attach the tubing, which runs to a hose fed bucket. I should mention that this meets my space concerns in the garage pretty well. ;)

NSXBill
03-22-2006, 02:31 PM
Does anyone know what the water flow rate would be for a water pump at idle, specifically a Johnson off of an Indmar 351 from 1990. I was wanting to check mine to see if it is providing the proper flow rate. I was thinking it was 2 gpm or 5 gpm, or something similar. Anyone know?

Can't remember how I know this, but I think it is 4.2 gpm at 650 rpm, 7.3 at 1000 rpm, and 15.2 at 2000 rpm, etc. It's stated in the Johnson catalog.

Here was the setup I used to test my pump on my 351.

Hoff1
03-22-2006, 02:56 PM
Those are the numbers I was looking for. I looked on Johnson's website, but didn't look l close enough I guess. Thanks, now I know how many water jugs I'll need to take with me.

NSXBill
03-22-2006, 03:19 PM
Those are the numbers I was looking for. I looked on Johnson's website, but didn't look l close enough I guess. Thanks, now I know how many water jugs I'll need to take with me.
Please double-check my numbers in the catalog

NSXBill
03-22-2006, 03:23 PM
Please double-check my numbers in the catalog
WHOA!

I just remembered, mine was a Sherwood pump. My set-up was non-Indmar, with Sherwood driven by a belt. Your's may be crank driven?

My numbers are not necessarily correct for you, I think...Sorry

Hoff1
03-22-2006, 03:45 PM
I checked just in case. I have a F6B-9 Johnson pump which isn't listed in their 2006 catalog, but it gives me enough of a clue to plan ahead. I'll probably rig up a tub system to catch the exhaust water for recirculation just in case.

jimmer2880
03-24-2006, 08:01 PM
Flipper- if the hose was a bit loose and was sucking air, as long as some water got to the impeller, it should be OK unless the flow was interrupted completely. Replacing the impeller is good insurance, though, and you can keep the other one as a spare, or look at it first before deciding.

88- the dealers who hate winterizing have no clue. It's just another service they need to provide to their customers, no more and no less. If they think they have too many boats to work on in that time of year, they should either come up with a better system, hire more seasonal help, work longer hours or just turn people away and let them go to a dealer who actually wants to do this for the customers. I wanted to use a tub at the first dealership but they didn't want to. I went to the other place and they were already doing it that way and had realized that doing it as a production line kind of thing is the only way to get them all done before they freeze. It takes a lot less time to get anti-freeze into all of the areas of a motor if all that's being sucked in is anti-freeze and not running it on cold water, then trying to get the 'stat to open with 3-5 gallons of cold anti-freeze. The anti-freeze in a tub is being recirculated and stays warm or hot, depending on how many boats are done in a given time period. Makes it really easy to get the 'stat to open, even on a cold day. Being efficient during winterization can make a big difference in whether a business makes money or not. I would really hate for my business to make money. :twocents:

It's not the most comfortable thing to do in some parts of the country, though. Cold, wet hands, feet, face, getting rained and snowed on, lots of wind, gets dark early, too much to do and not enough time. Too bad. It's part of the territory and if a dealer thinks it's going to be all flowers and champagne, they need to open their eyes. Complaining about too many boats coming in is just stoooooopid. The last owner of the first dealership I worked for used to complain about having to go and get more oil and filters every day. OK, if he had to go out of his way or if we weren't charging for them, that would be one thing. The problem I had with him complaining is that we were making good money on every oil change and he was still biatching about it. WTH??????? :confused:


OK, I'm done now and I feel much better.

Jim,

no doubt - if I was in that business - that sounds like the slickest setup ever.