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aprgriggs
09-18-2004, 10:17 AM
We went to finish the numbers on this house we wanted to build and the sales guy didn't come down on the price at all. :mad: So we went home.....now what do we do?

Anybody got any suggestions?

ski_king
09-18-2004, 10:19 AM
Try another builder? Competetion always helps to bring down the price.

aprgriggs
09-18-2004, 10:24 AM
Try another builder? Competetion always helps to bring down the price.

there isn't anouther builder in this area...you have to go across the Lake Lewisville bridge and traffic is horrible. So he's got us there....plus i like that Neighborhood :o

erkoehler
09-18-2004, 10:55 AM
Give it alittle time.

André
09-18-2004, 11:22 AM
Keep looking!The right deal will come along.
Good luck!

MarkP
09-18-2004, 11:46 AM
Go find a builder and bring him to your neighborhood if you can??

Thrall
09-18-2004, 12:21 PM
If Dallas is anything like Phoenix right now, good luck! It's a total seller's market here and housing prices are going up 1-2% a month. That's good once you finally get a house, but doesn't leave much room for bargaining when you're shopping.

John B
09-18-2004, 12:52 PM
Aprgriggs,
Watch out trying to get a builder that will give you a low bid, just to get the job.
Some builders had a level quality in their of work that cost money.
If you ask them the do something for too much less then they can get elsewhere,it will show in the finish product.
You know the old saying"You get what you pay for"
Will in most cases in contusion that mean you want the house built good you have to pay good.
If you don't want to pay good,well you know the rest.
Before you that a low bid from a contractor, check his references.
Don't just look at the homes that he has built, but talk to the people that he built them for. :smile:

lakes Rick
09-18-2004, 07:37 PM
If Dallas is anything like Phoenix right now, good luck! It's a total seller's market here and housing prices are going up 1-2% a month. That's good once you finally get a house, but doesn't leave much room for bargaining when you're shopping.

Where do all these Californians keep coming from?????

bret
09-18-2004, 08:23 PM
Buy something in Plano or North Dallas. Put the rest of the money in GM, MO, D - make 4-5% on dividends and tell the builder to perform an impossible sex act. NEVER, NEVER give a builder an edge. Get a friend who is a banker, sub out your work from frame to A/C, draw on credit, hire your wife as consultant, done deal. On yeah, if your marriage can survive building a house, it can survive anything but an affair.

bcampbe7
09-18-2004, 09:04 PM
bret-
When my wife and I build a house I will be calling you. How do you feel about spending some time in Middle Tennessee??? :D

lakes Rick
09-18-2004, 10:53 PM
Buy something in Plano or North Dallas. Put the rest of the money in GM, MO, D - make 4-5% on dividends and tell the builder to perform an impossible sex act. NEVER, NEVER give a builder an edge. Get a friend who is a banker, sub out your work from frame to A/C, draw on credit, hire your wife as consultant, done deal. On yeah, if your marriage can survive building a house, it can survive anything but an affair.

I agree with the above.. I have generaled ( and did alot of the work) on the two I built...

Add to the above good info: NEVER NEVER NEVER give any sub or builder ALL of his pay until he is completely done.. No matter how nice a guy ( or girl) they are, no matter how much of a "friend" you become.. OK to give out a percentage of the completed work, but ALWAYS keep the balance until the job is 100% complete.... Dont ask me how I know this.....

JimN
09-18-2004, 11:08 PM
Not only should the work be done, it should be done right. You should also agree on some kind of recourse if problems occur in a set amount of time, along with a time frame for fixing anything that goes bad. Of course, this agreement is void if the contractor goes under. Get a lot of references, too- both homeowners and especially trade references. If any subscontractors you talk to don't want to work with certain other subs or builders/contractors, you shouldn't want to, either.

Leroy
09-18-2004, 11:10 PM
aprgriggs; if you lock your self in then your are locked in! Look at other options, existing, other areas, etc. How does the build price compare with existing? It may be more than you want to pay, but where the market is at. We have build twice, both really excellent experiences. You really need to know and trust your builder. Our first builder had lived in the area and built for 40 years. Our second build had been in the business for 15 years and actually lived in the subdivision and had built ~20% of 200 homes over 8 years in the neighborhood. Cheapest isn't the best way to go. Know you will feel good about the builder and the quality home you will have in the end.

Does the area where you are building offer only one builder, no chance to bring in another builder?

Good luck, I have seen horror stories from building and but mostly happy $$ stories!

rem_p
09-19-2004, 06:56 PM
SUB IT ALL OUT!!!!!!!!! i am currently workin for a framer, all we do is build it and black it in...then get an electrician, plumber, sheet rocker, roofer, a/c man all to come in and do their thing...With what i know about all the builders in this area you wont be satisfied havin some body build all the way up from nothing till you move in...they drag it out, use the not so good subs so they can make more $$$$$$$$....oh and did i mention they drag it out? we framed a house in july for a builder because his crew was busy trying to finish up other houses in the area...one house had been started over 2 years earlier and was still not finished!!!! Basically if you can handle the responsibilities of subing the whole house out you will save money and probably be happier in the long run....hope my :twocents: helps

ski_king
09-19-2004, 07:28 PM
SUB IT ALL OUT!!!!!!!!!

Rem p's idea is a good one, I did almost the same thing. I built 60% of my house myself and subed the excivating, masonary and HVAC,

Although there are a few things that can be a problem.

Finding a mortgage that will let you do it that way.
Finding the best contractors to do the work for you. The good ones tend to be booked way in advance with the big home builders. Getting them to work you in can be tough at times. They tend to want to work for the longterm $$.

Dan K
09-19-2004, 10:39 PM
Another angle is to find out if the builder deals with real estate agents. If he sells the same house to a couple represented by an agent he must pay the agent commision usually 3%. If he does this he should rightfuilly give you, an unrepresented couple, the 3% as a discount. If he won't do this he is greedy and untrustworthy so I wouldn't deal with him at all.

aprgriggs
09-20-2004, 09:59 AM
Another angle is to find out if the builder deals with real estate agents. If he sells the same house to a couple represented by an agent he must pay the agent commision usually 3%. If he does this he should rightfuilly give you, an unrepresented couple, the 3% as a discount. If he won't do this he is greedy and untrustworthy so I wouldn't deal with him at all.

He will give us the 3% that he normally pays to a realtor, but no more. I really don't look at that as a discount because he would have paid it out anyway. Hopefully he will call us this week and give us something. Then we would feel better about the purchase. Everything about the house is good, but would be great with a better price

Thrall
09-20-2004, 10:41 AM
Buy something in Plano or North Dallas. Put the rest of the money in GM, MO, D - make 4-5% on dividends and tell the builder to perform an impossible sex act. NEVER, NEVER give a builder an edge. Get a friend who is a banker, sub out your work from frame to A/C, draw on credit, hire your wife as consultant, done deal. On yeah, if your marriage can survive building a house, it can survive anything but an affair.

Nice one bret, I like that. Really, if you have the organizational ability and a little general building knowledge, even if you sub out everything, you can, as the GC, save yourself a good 20% (builder's overhead and profit).

Rick, I have no idea. If you looked at the growth of PHX, Vegas, and Denver, you'd swear ther is noone left living in CA.

lakes Rick
09-20-2004, 11:32 AM
Nice one bret, I like that. Really, if you have the organizational ability and a little general building knowledge, even if you sub out everything, you can, as the GC, save yourself a good 20% (builder's overhead and profit).

Rick, I have no idea. If you looked at the growth of PHX, Vegas, and Denver, you'd swear ther is noone left living in CA.

Add Oregon, Washington, and Idaho to the stampede of unwanted Californians moving to these locations also.....

CTPJ
09-20-2004, 12:32 PM
Have a wife that's a builder :woohoo:

She builds spec houses in area developments. Actually, she is amazed that very few people try to negotiate the price. As most of her houses sell prior to completion, one win - win is when someone offers full price but negotiates for add-on at that price. Builder sees add-on at his cost and buyer sees add-on at what it would cost him to do it after closing. Just a thought.

Todd

lsupcar
09-20-2004, 09:20 PM
Bret, are you also RJT 993 from the Rennlist board? Just wondering. His profile states he lives in Lake Hamilton, Arkansas. Bill Z

east tx skier
09-21-2004, 02:06 PM
This is really making me glad we bought an 11 year old house a "little outside" of Dallas.

captkidd
09-22-2004, 12:02 PM
April, we did a lot of the work ourselves in order to get the price into our ballpark. We did all interior painting, bought the cabinets, light fixtures, plumbing fixtures, carpet and installation, appliances, etc. This way, we got what we wanted (not the cheap-o contractor stuff) and the cost wasn't included in the price of the house. I also built the deck on the back, did the landscaping, and installed the drop-ceiling in the basement (all of which were required by either the building codes or the bank). It took a little longer, required more upfront money, and a contractor that would allow us to do this, but it was without a doubt, worth it. I highly echo the suggestion to not pay anyone all their money until all the work is completely finished to your satisfaction. Once they're paid they have little incentive to finish the work (what ever happend to ethics?). We still have $400 that we never paid the contractor because he never came back for a final walk-through (probably worked out about even).