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Cloaked
12-28-2005, 09:46 PM
What constitutes a fire that is rated as say, a two alarm or a 5 alarm?

What is the baseline to rate or rank or catagorize a fire in the "alarm" measure?

mitch
12-28-2005, 09:55 PM
What constitutes a fire that is rated as say, a two alarm or a 5 alarm?

What is the baseline to rate or rank or catagorize a fire in the "alarm" measure?

I seem to remember hearing it's how may alarms were pulled (or called in)

Dan K
12-28-2005, 10:18 PM
I always thought it was how many stations responded

Quincy will know.

stump
12-28-2005, 10:34 PM
When a fire call is received, an alarm complement is sent out, corresponding to the info. received by dispatch. For example, for a report of a fire in a residential unit an alarm complement consisting of 2 pumpers, 1 rescue truck, 1 ladder truck and a district chief's car are sent on the initial alarm. This is known as a "1st alarm". Usually, upon confirmation of a working fire, a third pump and 2nd rescue are sent. If an alarm is received for a high-occupancy type building, (ie high-rise; 5 stories and up) the 1st alarm complement is usually the same as above, until the confirmation of a working fire. This is when a "second alarm" is transmitted, which in this case would be 2 pumpers, 1 rescue, 1 ladder, and 1 more district chief. This additional alarm is a minimum complement and can be added to according to circumstances. These are general protocols for the city I work in. (pop. ~ 650,000) Clear as mud?

atlfootr
12-28-2005, 10:35 PM
Why? Are you think'n of start'n one?

I thought it meant how many fire houses, it took to fight the fire!
Obviously depending how big of a fire it is... you might need more then one batallion. :firejump:

atlfootr
12-28-2005, 10:43 PM
If you want an answer from a real "firefighter" ask

quincyfirefighter
TT Enthusiast
:firejump:

stump
12-28-2005, 11:00 PM
Thought it meant how many fire houses, it took to fight the fire!
Obviously depending how big of a fire it is... you might need more then one batallion. :firejump:
Some (most) firehouses do not have sufficient apparatus to fight anything more than a car or at most, a garage fire. As soon as there is an occupancy load, or a larger structure, or both, you require a "full alarm complement". If the occupancy load is high (such as a high-rise or a hospital, etc.) an additional alarm complement is needed. Additional complements are referred to as "alarms" in this case. Example: 3 alarm complements = 3rd alarm fire. All these numbers differ slightly from one major centre to another (depending on apparatus staffing and equipment attributes) but the basic idea is the same: lots of fire and square footage = lots of trucks and cold, wet firefighters. I work in a firehouse with three machines (ladder, rescue and pumper) and ten firefighters. If we have a house fire in our "first-in district", we still require a chief, one more pump and one more rescue, which could possibly come from 3 other firehouses. So, that brings us to apparatus coming from 4 firehouses for a residential house fire. (sometimes more!)

Cloaked
12-28-2005, 11:34 PM
When a fire call is received, an alarm complement is sent out, corresponding to the info. received by dispatch. For example, for a report of a fire in a residential unit an alarm complement consisting of 2 pumpers, 1 rescue truck, 1 ladder truck and a district chief's car are sent on the initial alarm. This is known as a "1st alarm". Usually, upon confirmation of a working fire, a third pump and 2nd rescue are sent. If an alarm is received for a high-occupancy type building, (ie high-rise; 5 stories and up) the 1st alarm complement is usually the same as above, until the confirmation of a working fire. This is when a "second alarm" is transmitted, which in this case would be 2 pumpers, 1 rescue, 1 ladder, and 1 more district chief. This additional alarm is a minimum complement and can be added to according to circumstances. These are general protocols for the city I work in. (pop. ~ 650,000) Clear as mud?I'm an engineer.... 'Splain this easier... please.

Cloaked
12-28-2005, 11:35 PM
I'm an engineer.... 'Splain this easier... please.No wait, it's OK. It's just a question of curiosity.


Thank you for the time and effort.

Cloaked
12-28-2005, 11:38 PM
Some (most) firehouses do not have sufficient apparatus to fight anything more than a car or at most, a garage fire. As soon as there is an occupancy load, or a larger structure, or both, you require a "full alarm complement". If the occupancy load is high (such as a high-rise or a hospital, etc.) an additional alarm complement is needed. Additional complements are referred to as "alarms" in this case. Example: 3 alarm complements = 3rd alarm fire. All these numbers differ slightly from one major centre to another (depending on apparatus staffing and equipment attributes) but the basic idea is the same: lots of fire and square footage = lots of trucks and cold, wet firefighters. I work in a firehouse with three machines (ladder, rescue and pumper) and ten firefighters. If we have a house fire in our "first-in district", we still require a chief, one more pump and one more rescue, which could possibly come from 3 other firehouses. So, that brings us to apparatus coming from 4 firehouses for a residential house fire. (sometimes more!)But my point and question is this: I heard on the news today about a 3 alarm fire. They call it like I should know exactly what a damn 3-Alarm consists of. After what you told me, it would take a calculus formula to calculate what the he11 a 3-Alarm fire consists of.

stump
12-28-2005, 11:45 PM
But my point and question is this: I heard on the news today about a 3 alarm fire. They call it like I should know exactly what a damn 3-Alarm consists of. After what you told me, it would take a calculus formula to calculate what the he11 a 3-Alarm fire consists of.
Where I work it would mean a minimum of six pumpers, 3 rescue trucks, 3 ladder trucks, and 3 district chiefs. In addition, you would also have deputy chief, air bottle truck, and a few ambulances as well. It would probably be a warehouse or similar structure burning.

quincyfirefighter
12-29-2005, 02:33 AM
Stump is right. The amount of alarms is the amount of man power and type of appartus needed. Each area is difference. I live in about 22,000 square miles of forest service and CDF land. Our town has about 7,000 people in about 20 square miles so we have more wildland fires. But we do get our share of structure fires. Our run sheet is about 2200 med and fire. Our biggest fear would have to be wildland fires. And mutual aid would be our third alarm.

Cloaked
12-29-2005, 06:28 AM
Thank you kind Sirs for the information. :)

pilot02
12-29-2005, 09:40 AM
Where I work it would mean a minimum of six pumpers, 3 rescue trucks, 3 ladder trucks, and 3 district chiefs. In addition, you would also have deputy chief, air bottle truck, and a few ambulances as well. It would probably be a warehouse or similar structure burning.

So a simpler formula would be how ever many chiefs are needed, don't count the indians or equipment, right???

quincyfirefighter
12-29-2005, 10:39 AM
So a simpler formula would be how ever many chiefs are needed, don't count the indians or equipment, right???
Now! Now!! :purplaugh

River Rat
12-29-2005, 11:17 AM
To put in english a 3 alarm fire = a big a$$ fire!!

:uglyhamme

atlfootr
12-29-2005, 10:46 PM
Glad to know all the above, now I can sleep @ night :)