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View Full Version : Need some Canon camera gift advice.....


milkmania
12-07-2005, 10:14 PM
I've got some family (in laws) needed a decent point & shoot camera.

I feel they couldn't go wrong with the Canon line, but dang, there are so many!

help me find a decent one, cuz these are the good inlaws;)




from here with some minor editing......
http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/controller?act=ProductCatIndexAct&fcategoryid=113

edit:
in the $400.00 price range like this:
http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canonsd500/

BriEOD
12-07-2005, 10:23 PM
Don't know Milk? I have a Digital Rebel SLR.

bigmac
12-07-2005, 10:29 PM
I've got some family (in laws) needed a decent point & shoot camera.

I feel they couldn't go wrong with the Canon line, but dang, there are so many!

help me find a decent one, cuz these are the good inlaws;)




from here with some minor editing......
http://consumer.usa.canon.com/ir/controller?act=ProductCatIndexAct&fcategoryid=113

You forgot the most important part - price range.

If you're talking a pocketable point-n-shoot, I think the Elph line is the way to go, and you could pick from the SD200 up to the SD500 - whichever camera matches your budget. I have an SD400 and I like it a lot. My daughter has the SD200 and it is also good.

The major determiner of price in those cameras is sensor size. Sensor size has applicability only insofar as the size of the enlargements your in-laws want to make. If they never enlarge beyond 5x7 prints, then anything bigger than 3 megapixels is totally wasted. If they're doing 8x10s, then go to 5 megapixels. If they are computer-literate, also get them a copy of Photoshop Elements 2.0 and buy some gift certificates from Kodak Gallery (http://kodakgallery.com/Welcome.jsp) . They are cheap, ship fast, high quality prints, and easy uploading.

If you're going to order online, read this tutorial (http://www.ximinasphotography.com/lessons/lesson08/camera_2.html) first. Then buy from B&H PhotoVideo (http://bhphotovideo.com) .

milkmania
12-07-2005, 11:00 PM
You forgot the most important part - price range.

If you're talking a pocketable point-n-shoot, I think the Elph line is the way to go, and you could pick from the SD200 up to the SD500 - whichever camera matches your budget. I have an SD400 and I like it a lot. My daughter has the SD200 and it is also good.

The major determiner of price in those cameras is sensor size. Sensor size has applicability only insofar as the size of the enlargements your in-laws want to make. If they never enlarge beyond 5x7 prints, then anything bigger than 3 megapixels is totally wasted. If they're doing 8x10s, then go to 5 megapixels. If they are computer-literate, also get them a copy of Photoshop Elements 2.0 and buy some gift certificates from Kodak Gallery (http://kodakgallery.com/Welcome.jsp) . They are cheap, ship fast, high quality prints, and easy uploading.

If you're going to order online, read this tutorial (http://www.ximinasphotography.com/lessons/lesson08/camera_2.html) first. Then buy from B&H PhotoVideo (http://bhphotovideo.com) .

I did edit my post and you probably didn't notice it after you hit reply, but we're looking in the $400.00 price range.....
my last edit was 8:16;)

I'm personally leaning toward the SD500 http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/canonsd500/

some awesome pics with that camera
http://www.dpreview.com/gallery/?gallery=canonsd500_samples/
note the link at the bottom to open the large files

east tx skier
12-07-2005, 11:30 PM
I've got the digital elph s400 and love it. A coworker just got the regular powershot for $175. It is not much bigger than the elph. The elph has red eye issues as do many point and shoots because of the proximity of the flash to the lens. Mine doesn't have a "red eye flash," but I think the new ones do. I think Canon has excellent color rendition.

milkmania
12-07-2005, 11:32 PM
I think Canon has excellent color rendition.


I would believe so;)
http://img2.dpreview.com/gallery/canonsd500_samples/originals/img_0516.jpg


I like this one:
http://img2.dpreview.com/gallery/canonsd500_samples/originals/img_0441.jpg

east tx skier
12-07-2005, 11:35 PM
A majority of the shots of the boat I have on here were taken with a Canon Digital Elph (4 megapixel).

jimmer2880
12-08-2005, 12:30 AM
I have a digital elph s100 (the first model I believe they came out with). It's only 2 mega pixels - but have had it ever since 2 meg's was the hottest thing.

I bought it because at the time, it has the largest optical zoom in the smallest package. This camera is ALWAYS (and I really mean ALWAYS) in the diaper bag. It takes some real hard abuse & comes back for more.

It does have red-eye flash though (we never use it since the camera needs to be in manual mode to use it).

My biggest complaint is the 1/2 second delay between pushing the button & the actual pic being taken. But - my sister has the s300 and the delay is virtually gone.

east tx skier
12-08-2005, 01:09 AM
I'll have to give my manual another look about the red-eye flash in manual mode. Great cameras for sure.

bigmac
12-08-2005, 09:19 AM
I'll have to give my manual another look about the red-eye flash in manual mode. Great cameras for sure.

Red-eye flash modes are overrated IMHO, so I personally wouldn't let the presence or absence dissuade me from a particular camera. Far more effective is the red-eye removal that's part of the feature set of almost all the photo editing software these days, such as Photoshop Elements.

stevo137
12-08-2005, 09:34 AM
I have the Canon A85 and so far it has been a very good camera. An inlaw has the A95 and has had good results with it.
I have had some redeye issues and still need to read the instruction manual if I can find it. :rolleyes:

sizzler
12-08-2005, 09:43 AM
i also have the rebel.......nice camera

milkmania
12-08-2005, 10:29 AM
I've also noticed when you upload pictures to your wal-mart.com album, it's got red eye software to take the red out online:)

bigmac
12-08-2005, 10:59 AM
The point and shoot cameras use their sensors in a different mode - the image they present is basically a video capture. That's completely different than the digital SLRs like the Rebel and above - none of which even have the ability to capture any video.

The downside of the way that the p&s sensors work is that shutter, focusing, and metering take longer. There are a lot of things happening when you press the shutter button and they tend to happen slowly. Some p&s are better than others, but they all have shutter lag to some degree.

Workin' 4 Toys
12-08-2005, 11:23 AM
What causes the red eye you speak of. I don't think I have had that problem in a long time. This happens to digital pics too?

bigmac
12-08-2005, 11:52 AM
What causes the red eye you speak of. I don't think I have had that problem in a long time. This happens to digital pics too?

If the angle of the light from the flash, off the subject, and back to the camera lens is 3 degrees or less, then you get direct reflection off of the retina of the eye, which shows up as red. Note that that same reflection from a dog is usually green, and from a horse is usually yellow. Those differences are due to the different cellular makeup of the retina between those three species.

The closer the flash is to the lens, the more likely that angle to the retina will be less than three degrees and the more likely there will be red-eye. Obviously, the small size of a point-and-shoot means the flash will HAVE to be closer to the lens. One solution to redeye is a remote flash, farther away from the lens. If you ever have your portrait taken, you'll note that the photographer's flash units are way off of the camera.

The concept behind redeye reduction on these point and shoots is that a series of visible pre-flashes will cause the subject's pupils to constrict which will might make the critical angle less than 3 degrees. Redeye is still possible if the subject is close enough, however. It doesn't eliminate redeye, but it may reduce it.

east tx skier
12-08-2005, 12:24 PM
Very good explanation. The red-eye flash on my minolta digi slr works like a charm though. Completely elminates it where I'd had some red eye with the standard flash setting. Even with standard, it's still less than the P&S. But the flash points right down the barrel. Fortunately, I think Santa's brining me a new flash for the accessory shoe.

Workin' 4 Toys
12-08-2005, 04:41 PM
If the angle of the light from the flash, off the subject, and back to the camera lens is 3 degrees or less, then you get direct reflection off of the retina of the eye, which shows up as red. Note that that same reflection from a dog is usually green, and from a horse is usually yellow. Those differences are due to the different cellular makeup of the retina between those three species.

The closer the flash is to the lens, the more likely that angle to the retina will be less than three degrees and the more likely there will be red-eye. Obviously, the small size of a point-and-shoot means the flash will HAVE to be closer to the lens. One solution to redeye is a remote flash, farther away from the lens. If you ever have your portrait taken, you'll note that the photographer's flash units are way off of the camera.

The concept behind redeye reduction on these point and shoots is that a series of visible pre-flashes will cause the subject's pupils to constrict which will might make the critical angle less than 3 degrees. Redeye is still possible if the subject is close enough, however. It doesn't eliminate redeye, but it may reduce it.
Ok, you had me sold after the first sentence, but thanks for the "in depth". Now, how do you know when a "point and shoot" has this feature. Do they call it "anti red eye"?

east tx skier
12-08-2005, 04:52 PM
Look under the flash description. Should say red-eye reduction flash or something along those lines.

mitch
12-08-2005, 07:39 PM
I've got the digital elph s400 and love it. A coworker just got the regular powershot for $175. It is not much bigger than the elph. The elph has red eye issues as do many point and shoots because of the proximity of the flash to the lens. Mine doesn't have a "red eye flash," but I think the new ones do. I think Canon has excellent color rendition.


Ya can't go wrong w/ that camera. Love the ELPH line.

bigmac
12-08-2005, 08:54 PM
Ok, you had me sold after the first sentence, but thanks for the "in depth". Now, how do you know when a "point and shoot" has this feature. Do they call it "anti red eye"?

It will be prominently mentioned under "flash modes" in any list of camera specs, and will be referred to as "red-eye reduction" or some variation that includes the phrase "red-eye".

The best source of digital camera specs and review is DP Review (http://www.dpreview.com/reviews/specs.asp) and also Steve's Digicams (http://www.steves-digicams.com/hardware_reviews.html) .

Workin' 4 Toys
12-09-2005, 10:31 AM
Perhaps my Olympus has that and I did not even pay attention. Our last 3 cameras were Olympus and I have not thought about it since we stopped using 35mm.

bigmac
12-09-2005, 10:57 AM
Perhaps my Olympus has that and I did not even pay attention. Our last 3 cameras were Olympus and I have not thought about it since we stopped using 35mm.

If you're going to take pictures of people using flash, scroll through your flash selections (look for the icon:

http://mccollister.info/flash.jpg

and stop when you get to the red-eye reduction icon, which will look like

http://mccollister.info/eye.jpg