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JPA2002
07-06-2014, 10:14 PM
What is a 1999 Maristar 210 VRS worth that has single axle trailer, 330 hp engine, tears in rear seats, and almost 700 hours?

What is reasonable for hours? How long will these engines last?

Thanks
Jon

FrankSchwab
07-07-2014, 03:49 AM
Boy, you almost described mine perfectly. Except, no tears in the rear seats (the seams are pulling apart on the middle seat, but they're still held by the threads), and I have the 308 HP motor. But, I've got the single-axle trailer and about 600 hours on it.

The general opinion is that 2000 hours on one of these engines is like 200,000 on a car - you're about 50/50 on needing a rebuild at that point. At 700 hours, think of it as a 70K mile car - you may need to replace the water pump, or the alternator, but the motor should be solid for a long time if it's been taken care of.

Are you planning on buying, or selling?

I bought mine about 8 years ago for around 20K. I don't know what the current market is, but based on the price of new boats I ain't buying one of those in the near future unless I win the lottery. Perhaps the new boat price has kept used prices up.

There are a lot of variables when it comes to boat price - exterior condition, interior condition, trailer condition, engine condition, transmission condition. If you're planning on buying, plan on spending several hundred to get a competent marine inspector to check the boat. There are a lot of stories on here of people who bought an older boat that looked good to them, only to spend the next six months and $6000 fixing all the stuff that turned out bad.

The most common expensive issues that I've seen are:
1. Bent strut/drive shaft/prop. These aren't obvious to the untrained eye, but it's an expensive repair. As a quick check, stand ten feet behind the boat, down on one knee. Eyeball the shaft log (where the shaft goes through the hull) - it shouldn't touch any side of the log. Eyeball the strut (the brass piece that holds the drive shaft just in front of the prop). The vertical part of the strut extending from the shaft to the hull should be straight (the shaft will be slightly off to the side of the rudder). If it looks bent at all, it is bent and will need work, and the driveshaft should be pulled and inspected. Take $2k off the price; a full repair (prop, shaft, strut) will probably be a bit more, but you may not have to do all of that.
2. Engine. Check compression on all 8 cylinders. Check the oil and level - it should look like clean oil, not black and certainly not creamy (white in the oil says a water leak, which is a expensive, PITA repair).
3. Transmission. Check the oil - once again, it should look clean. It may be ATF (red) or engine oil (brown). White not allowed.
4. Always, always take it out on the lake. It should start immediately (it has fuel injection, so no carb issues), it should idle smoothly. Run it in reverse - a slight whine is normal. Run it in forward - idle, slow, medium, wide open. Operation should be quiet - shifting forward to reverse and back should be quiet. It should run 40-45 MPH on smooth water - if it won't, there's something wrong. While running at 35 MPH, look at the gauges - water temp should be 160, oil pressure should be good (60 IIRC). Pull it back to idle - water temp will probably go up to around 200, but should cool down after a few minutes. Oil pressure will droop, mine goes down to around 30 IIRC, which is fine. Raise the deck, and check the engine oil - it should still be clear and clean. Check the transmission fluid - clear and clean. Both should be at the same level that you started at. The transmission cooler was bad on mine, which caused transmission fluid to leak out of it, but didn't let water in.
5. Check the trailer carefully - a new one is $3K-$5K. Is it galvanized, or painted? Is there significant evidence of rust? Is there brake fluid in the master cylinder?

The major systems are the most important - badly oxidized gelcoat is simply a weekend job with a buffer. Broken gauges, lights, etc., are minor issues. Expect to replace the bilge pump ($50) and the blower ($30). If the steering isn't one-finger light, expect to replace the steering cable ($200). Expect to go through it and do all the annual maintenance, including greasing everything. Replacing the entire interior is a $3-$5K job; a couple of seat cushions should be several hundred.

8 or 10 pictures would certainly help here.

/frank

PS. You might want to start by looking at Steve's thread (http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=54362).

JPA2002
07-08-2014, 07:58 AM
Thanks, I will try to get some pics up. I have owned I/O boats, but never a V or Direct drive, so I am trying to make sure I go over it good. Where do I check the trans fluid?

It has the painted trailer. The boat is also a 1 owner boat.

Thanks for the thorough write-up and telling me the key items to check.

Jon

CC2MC
07-08-2014, 12:14 PM
Assuming everything is in working order and in good condition, about $20k is a fair price for that boat. You can find them more or less expensive, but that is a good general ballpark. Good suggestions by Frank though. I sold a boat with right at 700 hrs and it rand great with no problems at all. Good maint. records are key though. I would say, generally speaking, if it looks like it is just in okay condition, with upholstery and gelcoat, they probably don't have the MCOCD that many on this site have on their boats and the engine may be fine, but they may or may not have paid much attention to it as well.