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88 PS190
11-25-2005, 04:43 PM
Do you find the spray from the 80's Prostar 190's excessive? Or does it not effect that far forwards?

erkoehler
11-25-2005, 04:49 PM
Do you find the spray from the 80's Prostar 190's excessive? Or does it not effect that far forwards?


I have heard on the board some people talk about this issue. B.I. makes a boom extension that should help solve the problem.

Lance
11-26-2005, 09:05 AM
I have an 87 Prostar 190 and did not find the spray to be too bad when I was on the boom. I personally didn't spend a lot of time on the boom other than to learn tumbleturns and many failed attempts at trying to get up in a backwards deepwater. I had a lot of problems with the latter but can't attribute any of them it to the spray.

Also have taught a lot of barefooters (and regular skiers) on the boom since then and don't think the spray is an issue.

My boom is from barefoot international and has a bend in it between the pylon and the gunwale to accommodate the winshield extension (or whatever you call it). I do not use an boom extender.

My $0.02
Lance

jkski
11-26-2005, 09:24 AM
The spray can be an issue, however there are 2 fairly easy fixes. One, you can add the 18 inch extension from BI and you'll get further away from the boat and spray. BI sells them for around $75-$80 I think, but I have a spare one (long story), that I'll sell you for a lot less if you are interested (PM me if you want more detail.
The second thing you can do is to add weight to the side of your boat, opposite the side the boom is going out. (I got this one direct from Mike Seipel.) Typically, I use a fat sac and what it does is brings the boom side of the boat further out of the water, exposing the chines and letting the spray come off the bottom of the boat well behind the footer.
Hope this helps.

jkski
11-26-2005, 09:27 AM
I have an 87 Prostar 190 and did not find the spray to be too bad when I was on the boom. I personally didn't spend a lot of time on the boom other than to learn tumbleturns and many failed attempts at trying to get up in a backwards deepwater. I had a lot of problems with the latter but can't attribute any of them it to the spray.

Also have taught a lot of barefooters (and regular skiers) on the boom since then and don't think the spray is an issue.

My boom is from barefoot international and has a bend in it between the pylon and the gunwale to accommodate the winshield extension (or whatever you call it). I do not use an boom extender.

My $0.02
Lance

AH the pain of learning the backwards start. If you are still up to trying it, and haven't utilized the shoe skis, try them to help get your form right. Also, make sure that your boom is level with the water when sitting idle, not up like you'd want it for learning forward. The other thing to keep in mind is that this one is 80% driver....they can make or break you when learning, but once you get it, it is easier than going forward!!!

Lance
11-27-2005, 05:18 PM
Thanks for the advice jkski on the backwards deepwater but I am not up for it now and might not ever try again. Basically I was trying to do the backwards deepwater when I was 27. Now that I am 40 and have a couple of kids I am lucky to get slalom skiing in let alone a bunch of time on the boom (I only had my mastercraft in the water once this year as we use the pontoon almost exclusively with a 4 and 2 year old). I am thinking maybe when my kids get to the age of barefooting I might do some basic barefooting but will not likely be up for backwards attempts.

I'll remember the advice though in case my kids are ever up for it.

Talk about a pathetic post huh?

Lance

Kevin 89MC
11-28-2005, 01:11 PM
I've never noticed the spray on my '89 ProStar when using the boom. I haven't been on the 5' handle in a while, I usually either hold on to the boom or longline. I did use it to learn tumbleturns, and don't remember getting sprayed - at least from the boat.
Good luck,
Kevin

88 PS190
11-28-2005, 01:24 PM
that's all i needed to hear thanks. I think we'll get a boom mainly for its ability to help guests learn to get up on skis, with out the miserable dragging and half drowning that many of them go through before learning. It'll also be good for those who aren't fully comfortable w/ the water/ keeping themselves stable.

beyond that, i wanna learn to barefoot and I don't see that happening longline w/o many painful experiences.

BrianM
11-28-2005, 01:32 PM
I've never noticed the spray on my '89 ProStar when using the boom. I haven't been on the 5' handle in a while, I usually either hold on to the boom or longline. I did use it to learn tumbleturns, and don't remember getting sprayed - at least from the boat.
Good luck,
Kevin

I never had a problem with spray with my '88 and I didn't use an extension. Spray wasn't a factor at footing speeds even with the 5' line nor was it a problem at 10mph teach kids how to ski speeds.

Lance
11-29-2005, 09:16 PM
Here is a post from over a year ago on how to get up on the longline... the boom is definitely easier but if you don't get a boom don't let it stop you from trying this...

Without a boom I think the best bet is by sitting on a kneeboard. The general process that I use when getting up by kneeboard is:

1) Sit upright in the water with the kneeboard between your legs and the tip just showing out of the water (this is actually a little bit of a balancing act but helps once the rope gets tight).
2) Have the driver accelerate to about 18 mph with a nice gentle pull.
3) Get outside the wake on either the left or right side (left is probably a little easier for the driver). The easiest way is to cut left as soon as the driver starts the pull so you can get outside the wake before it even forms. Otherwise it is a little work to get over the big wake at 18.
4). Once you are up at 18 mph scoot as far forward on the board as possible. This prevents the board from bouncing (porposing) as you increase speed. I found the best way to scoot forward is hold handle with one hand, put other hand behind your but, put feet on tip, and lift your bottom and move forward. I usually get my but on the very front of the pad.
5).Give the driver a nod to indicate to speed up. I like to go about 33-35 but others will probably say faster.
6). Once up to speed I lay my body back (not all the way to the board but pretty close.
7) Take your feet off the kneeboard and place them on the water nearly flat with your toes curled up. Knees should be bent and feet on either side of the board.
8) Start putting downward pressure on your heels until you are up.
9) Breathe naturally and smile! you're up.

I learned this way but was never ever able to teach anyone else using this approach. Once I got the boom almost everyone could get up holding onto the boom (not as many using a 5' handle but some).

I echo the recommendation to wear a suit. Padded barefoot suit without sleeves is my preffered approach.

88 PS190
11-29-2005, 10:59 PM
yea that sounds like it'd work... my approach was to get a boom because i want to learn footing, but more than that we get alot of guests, and alot of little guests, some of whom are very intimidated being behind the boat, plus lots of the time it takes someone to help stabilize them, and swim to retrieve the rope after each and every fall, which is alot of work...

W/ the boom I think learning would be easier, but also teaching skiing to the younger people, and slalom starts to the older ones will be made quite alot easier.

Flatwaterfooter
11-30-2005, 03:40 PM
I used the boom without an extension on my 88 and did not have any problems. You felt the spary when you first start, but you get used to it and it does not effect you.

atlfootr
12-26-2005, 01:07 PM
Couldn't say, I own a '93 BF 200 - never had that problem :D

MarkP
12-26-2005, 01:41 PM
Jkski

Let me know if 88PS 190 is not interested in that extra 18”er.. I dropped you a PM..