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Andyg
11-14-2005, 06:41 PM
Does anyone else here have a DLP rear projection tv? Have you replaced your bulb yet. I have had a Toshiba for exactly 53 weeks now and the bulb burnt out last night. The bulbs are supposed to last between 3000 and 6000 hrs. I am sure I am less than 1000 hrs on this bulb (considering 1000 hrs would mean 3hrs a day 365 days a year). I now have to try and get Toshiba to do a "goodwill" warranty since I am 1 week out of warranty. I am not so worried about that as I am that they don't even have any bulbs in stock at Toshiba. That seems ridiculous to me that the manufacturer can't warranty my TV because they don't have the parts. I am sure they are pumping brand new TVs out of their manufacturing facilities though.

I called the place I bought it from and they have bulbs in stock, but wont sell it to me unless I pay them $70 to install it. Not to mention I can buy a new 32 tv for the price of the stupid bulb.

I have one last outlet though. I was fortunate in the fact I put this on on Mastercard when I bought it. Because of that fact Mastercard doubled my manufacturers warranty. That process is long, but I maybe able to get the $70 install cost recouped that way.

It also doesn't help that now I have no TV. We have a 32" that was in our spare room, but we never used it so I brought it up to our cabin last month. I guess I will have to entertain myself for the next week or two.

I just needed to vent, since I don't think something as expensive as that tv was should only last 1 yr.

JDK
11-14-2005, 06:59 PM
I'm pretty sure that 3000-6000 hrs. is of continuous use.....the more off/on/off cycles, the shorter the life.

Tom023
11-14-2005, 09:08 PM
I was told 3000 hours for my Mitsubishi. The service guy accessed a menu recently that showed I have 1700 hours at 1 year.

PendO
11-14-2005, 10:28 PM
Samsung 50" DLP ... 19mo old ... bulb is still doing okay ... I thinkg the tv prices have come down a lot since then ...arrrghhhhhh! How much do they want for a bulb? Also, did you check the toshiba website for install instructions? The samsung site (not that it helps you) has do-it-yourself instructions for replacing the bulb. (It's gotta be easier and cheaper than mod'ing your MCX:))

Andyg
11-14-2005, 10:47 PM
Samsung 50" DLP ... 19mo old ... bulb is still doing okay ... I thinkg the tv prices have come down a lot since then ...arrrghhhhhh! How much do they want for a bulb? Also, did you check the toshiba website for install instructions? The samsung site (not that it helps you) has do-it-yourself instructions for replacing the bulb. (It's gotta be easier and cheaper than mod'ing your MCX:))

I pulled the original bulb out tonight. Yes you are correct much easier than modifying the MCX.:D The bulb exploded inside the glass bulb housing. You can see a ton of shatteed glass in there. I am waiting on an eBay auction to end right now. List price for a bulb on Toshiba's website is $200. I hope I can get this one of of eBay for less than a $100, snipe bid of course. If they warranty the bulb I will at least have a back up then.

Andyg
11-14-2005, 11:11 PM
Well it ended up costing me $168.95:( . So I saved $30 and I should have it by the end of the week.

Leroy
11-14-2005, 11:33 PM
Act quickly! Seems like a premature death. However the info on the web is flawed.....I'll ask around work.


LIFESPAN

DLP manufacturers list the backlight bulb hours at around 80,000 hours. What's more, this bulb can be replaced for as little as $200 in some cases. Certain DLP TV displays require a technician to change their bulbs, and this will cost you more than the lamp itself. In other cases, though, the DLP is configured in a way that makes it easy for a layperson to replace burned-out bulbs. It all depends on the make and model of your DLP.

mitch
11-15-2005, 08:57 AM
Mine blew on my Hitachi DLP at approx. 1000 hrs but I had a compartment in the back containing a spare :D Hitachi sent me a goodwill one to replace that. I would recommend getting a spare. Hate for it to blow say during the superbowl, world series etc. I'm at 1500 hours so far on the new one no problem. They're rated to last approx. 3000 hours and at least on mine it's easy to check the hours and reset it to zero via remote when you replace it. Break out the manual if you need to. Handle w/ care when installing, they are very delicate and hope your ebayer and UPS are careful during shipping. Good luck.

tex
11-16-2005, 02:05 PM
How do you guys like DLP?

Tom023
11-16-2005, 02:47 PM
Ric,

I went DLP because Plasma was too costly for the 62" screen I needed. HD looks great, but not as bright as plasma and lower contrast. The blacks are better than LCD, but not as good as plasma. Standard definition leaves something to be desired at that screen size, but setting the output on 720P has improved it considerably. Once you are used to HD everything else looks bad.

Andyg
11-16-2005, 02:48 PM
Other than the bulb blowing I think it is awesome. I was looking at rear projection TVs the Toshiba was the only DLP they had and it blew away all the other nonplasma TVs they had. I was looking at a Sony rear projection that did not have the DLP and it wasn't even close to the same picture quality. The only thing that sucks is trying to watch a cable channel that is still broadcast with an analog signal. You can really pick up on the difference between a digital signal and analog signal just by picture quality. Watching HD programming though is incredible.

Hoosier Bob
11-05-2006, 08:15 PM
I have a battery backup on mine. I have heard that in the event of a power outage, voltage drop or what have you the cooling fan will fail and the bulb will break. I have had buddies tell me that theirs only lasted a week! Anyway no failures here as of yet and it did let me watch the DOLPHINS KICK THE BEARS ARSE TODAY!8p Man have they just crapped all over the Bears when it counts?

dmayer84
11-05-2006, 08:40 PM
I love mine and the picture on it is awesome. The good thing about the DLP is that images will not get burned into the display like plasmas and lcds. I do a lot of gaming to that was a big factor in my choice.

JimN
11-05-2006, 09:08 PM
Tom- "I went DLP because Plasma was too costly for the 62" screen I needed."

You actually need a 62" screen?

Tom023
11-05-2006, 09:17 PM
Yep Jim I do. Room size and the fact I have a built in cabinet in the room already dictate the size. When I had my 46 Sony it just looked unfinished.

Hoosier Bob
11-05-2006, 09:20 PM
I have a 62" and it feels like the wall is all TV! I find myself missing crap all the time because I was not looking at that part of the screen!

tex
11-05-2006, 10:07 PM
I have a battery backup on mine. I have heard that in the event of a power outage, voltage drop or what have you the cooling fan will fail and the bulb will break. I have had buddies tell me that theirs only lasted a week! Anyway no failures here as of yet and it did let me watch the DOLPHINS KICK THE BEARS ARSE TODAY!8p Man have they just crapped all over the Bears when it counts?
My wife looked at this post and said good gosh no.

Hoosier Bob
11-05-2006, 10:10 PM
Was that with a good old fashioned Chicago accent?8p My wife looked at this post and said good gosh no.

kennbarbie
11-05-2006, 11:11 PM
Other than the bulb blowing I think it is awesome. I was looking at rear projection TVs the Toshiba was the only DLP they had and it blew away all the other nonplasma TVs they had. I was looking at a Sony rear projection that did not have the DLP and it wasn't even close to the same picture quality. The only thing that sucks is trying to watch a cable channel that is still broadcast with an analog signal. You can really pick up on the difference between a digital signal and analog signal just by picture quality. Watching HD programming though is incredible.


Being in this line of work, the best thing about putting a new bulb in is that it will be just like buying a new tv. It will be bright just like the day you bought it. Yes they should go good on the warrenty. Get the area reps number from your dealer. Call him then go from there.

mitch
11-06-2006, 08:45 AM
Being in this line of work, the best thing about putting a new bulb in is that it will be just like buying a new tv. It will be bright just like the day you bought it. Yes they should go good on the warrenty. Get the area reps number from your dealer. Call him then go from there.

That's tru!

RexDog1
11-06-2006, 10:46 AM
I have a 61 Samsung DLP, and like it, plasma has a hard time keeping up with
Fast motion, also burns in. One day I think plasma will be the best TV
Out there.
The DLP Light Bulb in the Samsung should last 2000hrs.
My bulb went out at 2200hrs. Cost to replace $225.00 :cool:

Andyg
11-06-2006, 01:04 PM
This is really funny that this topic came back to life. I am actually looking at buying my second Toshiba DLP. I am going to go with another Toshiba since I have had only the problem with that one bulb blowing up. Toshiba did replace it under warranty. I have a spare bulb now just in case it goes out during the Superbowl or something.

This is the TV I am probably going to buy. My driving factor was size as I have to fit it into a built in wall cabinet. It meets all of my TV requirements and is the largest TV that will fit the space. I can get one off the internet for $1600 delivered to my door.

Toshiba 56HM66 (http://www.tacp.toshiba.com/televisions/product.asp?model=56hm66)

I am a little concerned about where I am putting this TV though. It is going to be in an open cabinet above a gas fireplace. I am going to tilt it forward at a 12 degree angle to componsate for the height of the tv versus where I will be viewing it from.

mitch
01-25-2007, 08:52 AM
My DLP bulb was rated for 3000hrs. TV is/has been working fine, but after watching my new LCD for the last week, I thought the DLP could be brighter. I had a spare new bulb, and the current one was at 3300hrs, so I swapped them, WOW so much brighter with the new bulb, glad I did it!!
(Hitachi 55" DLP)

Danimal
01-25-2007, 10:18 AM
This is all great information! Thanks! I am in the process of shopping around for a new TV. I'm such a tight wad that I don't want to pull the trigger on a plasma and the DLP seems to fit right in the budget that we have decided on. A friend just bought a Toshiba DLP 720p. Is there a huge difference to the naked eye from 720p to 1080p? Also, has anyone on here experienced the rainbow effect while viewing their DLP?

RexDog1
01-25-2007, 10:41 AM
This is all great information! Thanks! I am in the process of shopping around for a new TV. I'm such a tight wad that I don't want to pull the trigger on a plasma and the DLP seems to fit right in the budget that we have decided on. A friend just bought a Toshiba DLP 720p. Is there a huge difference to the naked eye from 720p to 1080p? Also, has anyone on here experienced the rainbow effect while viewing their DLP?

No Rainbow on my DLP???? But that would explain the Lepercom running around

JimN
01-25-2007, 10:41 AM
If you want true HD, you need the 1080P. 720 is not HD. Also, when you get into the larger sizes, you need more resolution, just like when you enlarge a photo.

They haven't finished duking it out over HD DVD and Blu-Ray but 1080P will end up being the standard, if there really is such a thing in consumer electronics.

Rainbow happens when you look at different parts of the screen quickly instead of one spot. Unfortunately, humans look at different areas of the screen constantly. If you're going to check out a lot of different models and brands at the stores, grab the remote to go into the menu and see how they have them set up. Most places will jack up the brightness, contrast and color level to make it look spectacular. Then, when you get it home, it looks "different". Well, it is but it's just that they tweaked everything. They often come jacked up right out of the box and this needs to be turned down. The brightness should be set to 6500 K. The contrast should be set so you don't see any artifacts from the screen or graininess. Color level should be set so the red doesn't "blow out", skin tones look natural and white is actually white. The black areas should be as close to actually being black as possible, not gray. DVD players have a spec called "Below black" or "blacker than black" and the borders will generally be as dark as the display will ever see, so use that area to set up the brightness and contrast.

Another thing they will never tell you is that jacking the brightness up shortens the bulb life considerably. That's the reason they crap out prematurely. Bulbs aren't cheap and some (Sony) come with a module that is calibrated at the factory so it will be correctly balanced. The other one was calibrated to that bulb and they aren't all exactly the same.

JimN
01-25-2007, 10:42 AM
This needs to be deleted- site responded too slowly.

Danimal
01-25-2007, 10:53 AM
Thanks Jim. Great info as usual from the "guru of just about everything"!

I did hear that some people are more sensitive to the "rainbow effect" than others. I have looked at many different DLPs while shopping and I don't see a rainbow nor do my wife or kids. I do have a friend, though, that cannot watch DLP because the rainbow effect is really annoying to her...

mitch
01-25-2007, 12:02 PM
720 is not HD? can you explain further? :confused: What OTA or sat~cable HD feeds are currently available in 1080P? I believe the answer is zero, but I could be wrong.

Also re: the rainbow effect, I understand the newer gen TI chips, higher wheel speeds, & 7-segment color wheels have largely elminated the effect. I've also read that less that 1% of population can see any adverse effect in the pic on DLP set. Again, I've never seen it on mine, nor has anyone who's watched the set over the few years I had it

Also understand 'they' are working on a disk that supports blu-ray and HD DVD. Don't know how true that is but would help eliminate a format war, esp since I have blu-ray :D


If you want true HD, you need the 1080P. 720 is not HD. Also, when you get into the larger sizes, you need more resolution, just like when you enlarge a photo.

They haven't finished duking it out over HD DVD and Blu-Ray but 1080P will end up being the standard, if there really is such a thing in consumer electronics.

Rainbow happens when you look at different parts of the screen quickly instead of one spot. Unfortunately, humans look at different areas of the screen constantly. If you're going to check out a lot of different models and brands at the stores, grab the remote to go into the menu and see how they have them set up. Most places will jack up the brightness, contrast and color level to make it look spectacular. Then, when you get it home, it looks "different". Well, it is but it's just that they tweaked everything. They often come jacked up right out of the box and this needs to be turned down. The brightness should be set to 6500 K. The contrast should be set so you don't see any artifacts from the screen or graininess. Color level should be set so the red doesn't "blow out", skin tones look natural and white is actually white. The black areas should be as close to actually being black as possible, not gray. DVD players have a spec called "Below black" or "blacker than black" and the borders will generally be as dark as the display will ever see, so use that area to set up the brightness and contrast.

Another thing they will never tell you is that jacking the brightness up shortens the bulb life considerably. That's the reason they crap out prematurely. Bulbs aren't cheap and some (Sony) come with a module that is calibrated at the factory so it will be correctly balanced. The other one was calibrated to that bulb and they aren't all exactly the same.

JimN
01-25-2007, 12:34 PM
First, the HD DVD vs Blu-Ray- LG just came out with a piece that does both.

Not everyone sees the rainbow effect but not everyone knows what to look for. If someone sees it, they see it but if it's not bothering them, no biggie. It bothers some people and not others so whether it's an issue is up to the buyer. If it looks good to the person who owns one, there's no problem at all.

As far as HD, go to this link for more info:

http://www.answers.com/topic/high-definition-television.

Typically, HD is used to describe a display that shows twice the lines of a regular set. Not much raising to that bar since the NTSC standard was based on the old B&W design and the NAB/FTC didn't want to make all of the B&W sets immediately obsolete by coming up with a color system that wasn't compatible, regardless of it being better or not. The rest of the world was able to go direct to color TV and has always had better resolution. Japan used basically the same as the US because we had such a strong presence after WWII. And, they wanted to make goods for import to the US.


The "native resolution" has a lot to do with how the sources will look. Her's a link for that:

http://www.answers.com/topic/native-resolution

No cable or sat broadcasts are in 1080P AFAIK, just 1080i max, which is just 540, interlaced. Interlaced tends to be better for action images because it takes less time to regenerate than progressive, which starts at the top and scans downward. HD/BluRay DVD both do 1080p and on a larger set, the difference is visible to a lot of people. On a smaller display, the difference is much harder to see unless the comparison if between a HD channel and a non-HD channel. I have a 27" set on an HD DirecTV box, using the composite video input. The HD channels are a lot better than the non-HD ones. When I had cable, I used a HD box because the audio is a lot better on the HD channels (no FTC restriction on frequency response like the NTSC standard, which is 30-15K). Non-HD channels look really bad on big plasma, LCD and DTV displays, in almost every situation I have seen.

mitch
01-25-2007, 12:50 PM
lifted from--> http://www.hometheatermag.com/glossary/

great mag, btw

HDTV: High-Definition Television. The high-resolution subset of our DTV system. The FCC has no official definition for HDTV. The ATSC defines HDTV as a 16:9 image with twice the horizontal and vertical resolution of our existing system, accompanied by 5.1 channels of Dolby Digital audio. The CEA defines HDTV as an image with 720 progressive or 1080 interlaced active (top to bottom) scan lines. 1280:720p and 1920:1080i are typically accepted as high-definition scan rates.

Had a feeling there was no 1080p broadcasts, but understand it's coming.

I was actually surprised how well my std def Direct TV signals come across on my new LCD. Looks pretty good, but not as good as my 27" tube looked. I used a spendy s-video cable, which I think helps. That's the best I had out the back of the Tivo box

OhioProstar
01-25-2007, 01:27 PM
Mitch you do not have a component(thanks JimN) output for the TiVo box? Red, Green, Blue? I have a DVD player from '98 that I still use that had component. There is a HUGE difference doing to the idividual colors.

JimN
01-25-2007, 02:50 PM
Mitch- try that LCD set with a HD box, even using the composite video inputs. Much better than a std def box. I did it with cable and when I switched to sat, it's even better than TW Cable.

I don't know why, but I have never seen a great S-video picture. Used pricey cables, and cheap ones. I won't buy one and have usually made up the component, composite, audio and digital coax cables from bulk materials. Personally, I like the Genesis, Liberty and West Penn cables (usually some of them use Belden with their name on it) but I'm going to try Planet Waves now that they fixed their initial goof up.

JimN
01-25-2007, 02:51 PM
Ohio- RGB is component video, not composite.

djhuff
01-25-2007, 03:15 PM
I bought a $150 four year bulb replacement plan with my TV. Good for up to 3 bulbs in that time span.

The way I look at it, if the bulb blows once, I'm ahead. The TV is a little over a year old, so it's coming.

mitch
01-25-2007, 03:47 PM
Mitch- try that LCD set with a HD box, even using the composite video inputs. Much better than a std def box. I did it with cable and when I switched to sat, it's even better than TW Cable.

I don't know why, but I have never seen a great S-video picture. Used pricey cables, and cheap ones. I won't buy one and have usually made up the component, composite, audio and digital coax cables from bulk materials. Personally, I like the Genesis, Liberty and West Penn cables (usually some of them use Belden with their name on it) but I'm going to try Planet Waves now that they fixed their initial goof up.


Jim, I'm running over the air HighDef using an outdoor antenna and the built in tuner. Pic is amazing! CBS, ABC, Fox, NBC, and PBS are all perfect, and PBS has some of the best OTA content available

mitch
01-25-2007, 03:48 PM
Mitch you do not have a composite output for the TiVo box? Red, Green, Blue? I have a DVD player from '98 that I still use that had composite. There is a HUGE difference doing to the idividual colors.
No, it's a non HD box--> 2 sets of red/white/yellow, coax and 1 s-video. Thx

mitch
01-25-2007, 03:49 PM
Mitch- try that LCD set with a HD box, even using the composite video inputs. Much better than a std def box. I did it with cable and when I switched to sat, it's even better than TW Cable.

I don't know why, but I have never seen a great S-video picture. Used pricey cables, and cheap ones. I won't buy one and have usually made up the component, composite, audio and digital coax cables from bulk materials. Personally, I like the Genesis, Liberty and West Penn cables (usually some of them use Belden with their name on it) but I'm going to try Planet Waves now that they fixed their initial goof up.


Jim, BTW, Direct TV could not 'see' the HD Sat needed for Highdef, that's why I'm using OTA. Better than nothing, but NFL Network, ESPN, and DiscoveryHD etc would sure be nice. Thx

milkmania
01-25-2007, 04:08 PM
all this digital talk..... HD this, HD that:rolleyes:



I'm still trying to watch the scrambled porn channels:noface:

JimN
01-25-2007, 04:16 PM
Too much rust on your coffee can? Point it more downtown, that'll get the channels less scrambled.

mitch
01-25-2007, 04:56 PM
Ah, I remember those days, those black boxes were great and little descramblers were great.

Andyg
03-10-2007, 08:06 PM
Well my second DLP bulb just blew in my Toshiba. The last time it blew I was able to get one bulb under warranty and then I bought a spare. At least I had a spare when this one blew. The first bulb lasted 53 weeks and the second bulb lasted 68 weeks. I am pretty disapointed in the bulb life on this TV. I would expect based on the info I found that the bulb would last at least 2 years. Dropping $200 a year on a new bulb seems to be pretty excessive for a DLP TV.

Ric
03-10-2007, 08:09 PM
did your mama ever tellya you watch too much tv?

Andyg
03-10-2007, 08:16 PM
did your mama ever tellya you watch too much tv?

I wish my Toshiba had an hour meter so I could see how much TV I actually watch.

Leroy
03-10-2007, 08:20 PM
Typical life is 1000-2000 hours so 3 hours a day means it lasts 333 days, little less than a year.

mitch
03-10-2007, 09:42 PM
Well my second DLP bulb just blew in my Toshiba. The last time it blew I was able to get one bulb under warranty and then I bought a spare. At least I had a spare when this one blew. The first bulb lasted 53 weeks and the second bulb lasted 68 weeks. I am pretty disapointed in the bulb life on this TV. I would expect based on the info I found that the bulb would last at least 2 years. Dropping $200 a year on a new bulb seems to be pretty excessive for a DLP TV.


My math tells me your TV is north of 2 years, time for an upgrade:D

Andyg
03-10-2007, 09:46 PM
My math tells me your TV is north of 2 years, time for an upgrade:D

Well I bought a 56" Toshiba DLP for our new entertainment area in Nov so I got my new TV fix recently. I will have to see how long the bulb in this TV lasts.

JimN
03-10-2007, 09:53 PM
What are you using for surge suppression? Also, bulbs being turned on/off repeatedly (not immediately, just frequently) don't last long. I would be on the phone with the technical department ASAP if it was mine.

You're in engineering/technical, right? Tell them that and they will generally give out more information than if they were talking to some guy "who's good with that kind of stuff". They may be able to tell you some things to check- line voltage and polarity being two big ones. The plug on the power cord is polarized for a reason.

Leroy
03-10-2007, 10:43 PM
Actually I bet it does, not sure how you get to it or if you can. Most consumer devices like this have warranty start timers, hour timers, etc to keep track of how long it has been on. Often only service techs can get to this.

You could keep a simple log

I wish my Toshiba had an hour meter so I could see how much TV I actually watch.

Ric
03-11-2007, 12:02 PM
What are you using for surge suppression? Also, bulbs being turned on/off repeatedly (not immediately, just frequently) don't last long. I would be on the phone with the technical department ASAP if it was mine.

You're in engineering/technical, right? Tell them that and they will generally give out more information than if they were talking to some guy "who's good with that kind of stuff". They may be able to tell you some things to check- line voltage and polarity being two big ones. The plug on the power cord is polarized for a reason. That's pretty funny Jimn regarding tech support

Andy I remember this thread when you had the first bulb problem and I thought that if I were in the TV search right now I'd shy from dlp for this reason (knows nothing about tv's )

Andyg
03-12-2007, 01:28 PM
I just talked to my dad who owns a 56" Toshiba DLP. His first bulb just blew last weekend and his TV is onnly 13 months old. So it appears it is either a Toshiba specific problem or DLPs in general have crappy bulb life.

tex
03-14-2007, 10:33 PM
Contact the retailer, Toshiba or DLP does not make the bulb.

JimN
03-14-2007, 11:36 PM
Andy- when you bought the set, did you check the color, brightness, contrast and other settings, or make any adjustments to them? A lot of TVs of all types come with the brightness and contrast jacked up too high to look natural but since the picture "pops" so well, they think it's great. Unfortunately, brightness and contrast set too high will kill a bulb and it doesn't matter if it's a rear projection, direct view TV (CRT/plasma/LCD), front projector or any other kind. None of them are made to have the settings so high. Also, I can think of no retailer that goes out of their way to set up audio or video systems to sound and look their best. Sure, they sell all kinds of pricey cables and equipment but setup is really lacking from everyone I can think of and I have been in the business for a long time.

To be fair, some of us can't do it all because of time constraints coupled with the cost and lack of demand. Others don't want to, either because of the expense of training and special equipment or they don't see a need for it. Either way, I see setup as a much needed part of any system, no matter how simple the system may be. Just a TV? It needs setup. Full blown home theater? It needs a lot of setup. Something in between? Needs setup. Dealers have a hard time getting people to believe that the sound and video quality will depend on the room as much as the equipment and people don't want to spend the money to have things set up properly because it's not cheap.