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stevo137
11-10-2005, 12:53 AM
Happy Birthday Marines!
230 years!
OOAHH!
SEMPER FI.

erkoehler
11-10-2005, 12:54 AM
Don't personally know any Marines, but thank you for all that you do :D

stevo137
11-10-2005, 12:59 AM
...................

Farmer Ted
11-10-2005, 09:03 AM
Happy Birthday Marines!
230 years!
OOAHH!
SEMPER FI.

Rock on Stevo!

But I think you got an H out of order HOOAH, OOAHH is what you say when your taking a healthy dump....

bradamerry
11-10-2005, 09:23 AM
:uglyhamme :uglyhamme Rock on Stevo!

But I think you got an H out of order HOOAH, OOAHH is what you say when your taking a healthy dump....

Leroy
11-10-2005, 09:37 AM
Happy Birthday Marines! All true heros

(1) First to Fight. Marines have been in the forefront of every American war since the founding of the Corps. They entered the Revolution in 1775, even before the Declaration of Independence was signed! Marines have carried out more than 300 landings on foreign shores. They have served everywhere, from poles to tropics; their record for readiness reflects pride, responsibility, and challenge.

(2) Leatherneck. This nickname goes back to the leather stock or neckpiece, which was part of the Marine Corps uniform from 1775 to 1875. The leather collar was designed to protect the jugular vein from saber slashes. It also insured that Marines kept their heads erect and maintained military bearing. Although no longer used, it is commemorated by the standing collar on the dress blue and dress white uniform.

(3) Uncommon Valor was a Common Virtue. Refers to the victories in World War II, especially at Iwo Jima, the largest all-Marine battle in history. Admiral Nimitz's ringing epitome of Marines fighting on Iwo Jima was applied to the entire Marine Corps in World War II: "Uncommon valor was a common virtue."

(4) Devil Dogs. In the Belleau Wood fighting in 1918, the Germans received a thorough indoctrination into the fighting ability of Marines. Fighting through supposedly impenetrable woods and capturing supposedly untakeable terrain, the men of the 4th Marine Brigade struck terror in the hearts of the Germans, who referred to Marines as the "Teufelhunden", meaning "fierce fighting dogs of legendary origin" or as popularly translated, "Devil Dogs."

(5) THE MARINE CORPS MOTTO. That Marines have lived up to their motto, "Semper Fidelis" (Always Faithful), is proven by the fact that there has never been a mutiny among U.S. Marines. This motto was adopted about 1883. Before that, there had been three mottoes, all traditional rather than official. The first, "Fortitudine" (With Fortitude), appeared about 1812. The second, "By Sea and by Land," was obviously a translation of the Royal Marines' "Per Mare, Per Terram." Until 1848, the third motto was "To the Shores of Tripoli," in commemoration of O'Bannon's capture of Derne in 1805. In 1848, after the return to Washington of the Marine battalion which took part in the capture of Mexico City, this motto was revised to "From the Halls of Montezuma to the Shores of Tripoli." The current Marine Corps motto is shared with England's Devonshire Regiment.

(6) The President's Own. Established by an act of Congress in July 1798 (more than a century before the bands of the other three services), the Marine Band has performed at White House functions for every president except George Washington. Thomas Jefferson was especially fond of the band. Because of its traditional privilege of performing at the White House, the band is spoken of as "the President's Own."

(7) Retreat, Hell! We Just Got Here! Fighting spirit and determination against heavy odds is a sound tradition in the Marine Corps. Nowhere is there a more graphic illustration than an incident which occurred in World War I. Legendary or true, it personifies the aggressive attitude of Marines. The occasion was the third great German breakthrough of 1918, when the 4th Marine Brigade and its parent 2d Infantry Division were thrown in to help stem the tide in the Belleau Wood sector. The 2d Battalion, 5th Marines had just arrived at its position when an automobile skidded to a stop and a French officer dashed out and approached the commanding officer. He explained that a general retreat was in progress and that orders were for the Marines to withdraw. The Marine officer exclaimed in amazement, "Retreat Hell! We just got here!" The Marines proceeded to prove their point. The battalion deployed and took up firing positions. As the Germans approached, they came under rifle fire which was accurate at ranges beyond their comprehension. Not in vain had the Marine Corps long stressed in its training the sound principles of marksmanship. The deadly fire took the heart out of the German troops, and the attack was stopped.

(8) Gyrenes The term "gyrene" is a jocular reference to Marines which was first used in England as early as 1894. It was used in the United States around the time of World War I. Its exact origin is unknown, but it did appear to have a derogatory meaning in its early usage. It has been suggested that the term may embody a reference to pollywog, a naval slang term for a person who has not yet "crossed" (the equator), hence, a landlubber.

(9) Jarhead A slang term used by sailors as early as World War II to refer to members of the Marine Corps, drawing the term from the resemblance of the Marine dress blues uniform, with its high collar, to a Mason jar which at the time was made from blue glass.

sizzler
11-10-2005, 09:52 AM
thanks for the history lesson leroy,........ :headbang:

River Rat
11-10-2005, 10:55 AM
Happy Birthday men...........Rock ON :headbang:

Ric
11-10-2005, 10:57 AM
Excellent post stevo
Happy Birthday to the Corps!

and an honored salute to all who were and are willing to fight and die for my country!

maristarman
11-10-2005, 05:48 PM
Fly it high.

jimmer2880
11-11-2005, 09:42 AM
Here Here! :headbang: