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chunter
04-10-2014, 02:14 PM
I have 2 children a 7 year old son and a 5 year old daughter that hae expressed a desire to wakeboard this summer. They are both in the 50lb range and have never wakeboarded before. They have been behind the boat a ton of times on a trainer inflatabel ski so there is no fear of the water or being back there. along with that they are both really good swimmers and i think they will love it. I dont know where to go to get a ski for that size child, is there anywhere that might have something and what size should i get.

Nick911
04-10-2014, 02:31 PM
You want them skiing or boarding. My 5-year old has been using a Hyperlite Motive 109.

MI_Corey
04-10-2014, 02:32 PM
I would recommend a Hyperlite Motive as well. When my kids get big enough, that's what I will be getting them.

GoneBoatN
04-10-2014, 02:53 PM
You say ski but you posted in the wakeboard/wakeskate section.

For wakeboard and kids that small/young, I think your biggest challenge will be the boots/bindings. I suggest you stop by a good board shop with a large selection and see what they can do for you.

GoneBoatN
04-10-2014, 02:55 PM
Oh, and when you first start out with them, keep in mind you can't go slow enough and make the start gentle enough - they pop out of the water so easy and it does not take much for them to plane on the water. This keeps any falls "soft".

chunter
04-10-2014, 03:10 PM
sorry i ment wakeboarding not skiing. i had planned on holding the rope myself from the rear seat to get them going and doing it really slow so if they go down i can jump in and help and they are not towed by the roap hooket to the boat.
nick what bindings do you have on the board.

neil.anderson63
04-10-2014, 03:18 PM
Both of my kids used the Motive - Excellent board - I think I still have the little bindings, I will make sure next time I'm at the lake - I will post them so someone can get some use out of them. Look for them at the end of April.

Kweisner
04-10-2014, 03:55 PM
At that size, they will pop up just above idle! I think we had our kids out of the water at something like 4-5 mph.

In the unlikely event a wakeboard ends up being too tricky, maybe a kneeboard with a rope hook would be an intermediate step.

jafo9
04-10-2014, 04:30 PM
sounds silly, but i find i have to really stress to new learners/kids to remember to let go of the rope when they are falling. seems intuitive, but there must be some sort of instinct they have to hang on to the rope after they face plant on the start. i'll also ditto the go slow advice. you can almost pop them out of the water while running along the dock with them in the water. i think our kids learned on a 120cm board. it was the smallest we could find at the time. my youngest was around 6 or 7 when she learned a few years ago.

mitchelmilitiapres
04-10-2014, 06:22 PM
Honestly one board should be ample for the both of them this young. A motive 109 or something similar in another brand would be fine for the first couple years. Untill the whole sibling rivalry factor kicks in. Then you may have to pony up for a second. Stay away from Walmart/Academy/Dick's equipments ie: hydroslide; as these products may be cost effective, they won't give you more than a season or two at most.
Happy riding!

chunter
04-10-2014, 06:44 PM
thanks for all the info.

GoneBoatN
04-10-2014, 06:51 PM
I don't think I would hold the rope. I have had no problem with younger ones just letting go. Going at the slow speed they will have plenty of reaction time to let go. The boat will be going so slow, when you cut the throttle you will stop quickly. A good fitting PFD is their best friend in the water.

A couple things I do. 1) I insist that only one person is doing the instruction. When others kick in and you got all kinds of advice and instruction flying it only confuses and frustrates the kid in the water. 2) Keep your advise to a minimum and only an item or two max at a time while in the water until said item is corrected (as much as possible), only then focus on another aspect. 3) Keep it simple. 4) be ready to recognize when their strength is gone. Get them back in the boat and give them a rest. Cold water really drains their energy, fast. 5) The whole goal is to just get them up and going slowly. After that, just drive them around, let them have fun and enjoy their accomplishment.

Nick911
04-10-2014, 06:55 PM
Don't know what bindings the Motive has, they came as a package. They are Hyperlite though.

We found the opposite for our kid getting him up. We found it was more important for the tug to be gradual but consistent yet still a good tug to pop him out. We initially started him at wakesurf speeds and I think we took him up to 12.

Our two boys both knee board as well which helps with comfort behind the boat. One more thing I did was dryland, so, getting them used to the motion on the grass, then at the end of the dock with my feet under the board as counter leverage. Knees bent, arms straight. It probably took the oldest 20 tries to get out of the water his first time. A lot of those tries were me in the water with him but we gave that up and just popped him up with me on the boat.

Kweisner
04-10-2014, 07:35 PM
I don't think I would hold the rope. I have had no problem with younger ones just letting go. Going at the slow speed they will have plenty of reaction time to let go. The boat will be going so slow, when you cut the throttle you will stop quickly. A good fitting PFD is their best friend in the water.

A couple things I do. 1) I insist that only one person is doing the instruction. When others kick in and you got all kinds of advice and instruction flying it only confuses and frustrates the kid in the water. 2) Keep your advise to a minimum and only an item or two max at a time while in the water until said item is corrected (as much as possible), only then focus on another aspect. 3) Keep it simple. 4) be ready to recognize when their strength is gone. Get them back in the boat and give them a rest. Cold water really drains their energy, fast. 5) The whole goal is to just get them up and going slowly. After that, just drive them around, let them have fun and enjoy their accomplishment.


Awesome advice!

chunter
04-11-2014, 11:10 AM
thanks for all the info that is some really good advise i will give it a shot, hopefully next weekend.

zamboniman
04-11-2014, 12:36 PM
With any newbie big or small.. the grass training first and then pulling them by hand against the platform in the water goes a LONG way. You can squash the bad form or fighting the pull immediately with no loss of energy where once behind the boat turns into an exhausting experience and many minutes of getting setup again. Any time we've done some grass time and platform time 95% of the time they getup first try behind the boat. The others that think they are too cool for that struggle behind the boat and some never get it. I can't tell you how many times we've had the girls showing up their men because they listened and the men were like throw me the rope I can do this.

Now with the little little ones obviously a bit more challenging. I fully agree that everyone needs to keep their mouths shut and let one competent individual do the instructing. Nothing worse than everyone thinking they know the drill shouting lean forward lean back yadda yadda (half of them never even doing it themselves).. etc..

I eventually plan to introduce my little one in a pool for her initial go at it. Possibly even rigging a spool/garden hose real or similar.