PDA

View Full Version : what do you your PDA for?


milkmania
10-25-2005, 07:44 PM
I've played around with the cheap PalmŪ Zire model for ballplayers contact information, and scheduling ballgames and the typical uses....calendar, clock etc....

my wife mentioned tonight that the attorney's firm she works for has had a few PDA's since March 2005!!!
It appears they attend some sort of class to learn how to use them, but they felt over-whelmed, so they just kept them boxed up

I'm unsure of make, model, or features right now but will learn more about them soon.

I'm reasonably sure the operating system for them is Windows CE, but don't know if they're wireless or anything.

but, what do you use yours for?

Leroy
10-25-2005, 08:11 PM
Casio with Win CE I think. Mostly for gathering dust.......


I carry my laptop with me everywhere, meetings, etc. Much more useful.

milkmania
10-25-2005, 08:15 PM
Casio with Win CE I think. Mostly for gathering dust.......


I carry my laptop with me everywhere, meetings, etc. Much more useful.

noted

which laptop, and specs???

Leroy
10-25-2005, 08:34 PM
Dell Latitude D600. Corp issue, basically no choices. I hate it and wish I had my Compaq N600 that was 4 years old back. Everyone in the company hates the Dell laptops (I guess except the guy that got the money saving deal with them).Processor x86 Family 6 Model 13 Stepping 6 GenuineIntel ~1594 Mhz:shocked:

ski36short
10-25-2005, 08:38 PM
*commence threadjack*
Leroy, that's funny. We all hate our Compaq/HPs at work - convinced that we have them cuz an HP guy sits on the board! My last job had Dells which seemed bulletproof. I just turned in my evil POS Compac Evo 600c for an HP 6230 yesterday - Still working out the bugs but basically due to newer equipment it's a quantum leap. The other one had gotten really fragile
*end threadjack*

Ditto with the laptop here. I don't see the need for a PDA when my laptop is with me 90% of the time.

milkmania
10-25-2005, 08:42 PM
Dell Latitude D600. Corp issue, basically no choices. I hate it and wish I had my Compaq N600 that was 4 years old back. Everyone in the company hates the Dell laptops (I guess except the guy that got the money saving deal with them).Processor x86 Family 6 Model 13 Stepping 6 GenuineIntel ~1594 Mhz:shocked:

I worked on a young man's Dell Laptop a while back.....
it'd run fine for a little bit, like watching a DVD, but then it'd start freaking out.

seems they had a little breathing problem and weren't getting sufficient air to the processor and heat sink fins.... not sure which model Dell

but blew it out and instructed him to keep a little air space at the bottom where the air port was located.
and showed him where I'd done a little research on laptop regarding laptop stands and fans.
dunno if he bought a stand of not, but that was the hottest laptop I'd ever had in my lap! You could iron your pants with it

milkmania
10-25-2005, 08:46 PM
*commence threadjack*
Leroy, that's funny. We all hate our Compaq/HPs at work - convinced that we have them cuz an HP guy sits on the board! My last job had Dells which seemed bulletproof. I just turned in my evil POS Compac Evo 600c for an HP 6230 yesterday - Still working out the bugs but basically due to newer equipment it's a quantum leap. The other one had gotten really fragile
*end threadjack*

Ditto with the laptop here. I don't see the need for a PDA when my laptop is with me 90% of the time.



you know......
where you corporate guys replace your old laptops....

think about the little guys!
I'd love to get a deal on a good used corporate laptop for home use.
I turned down one yesterday, but it was older with a 450 mhz processor for $300.00

milkmania
10-25-2005, 08:52 PM
Leroy, check this Dell 610 out.....

overstock.com
http://www.overstock.com/?page=proframe&prod_id=1136954



*edit:
factory recon

3event
10-25-2005, 08:57 PM
I have used a PDA since Palm V's started rolling out. I use my Compaq IPAQ primarily for the address book/contact list. Also a few spreadsheets for planning, product pricing. A couple of pics of the family and the MC. I have 950 contacts in Outlook and update notes for business contacts whenever I meet with them. Its indispensible when on the road / around town. Use it to take notes for impromptu meetings. Occasionally pen an offline email (gets sent when I sync up with laptop).

And this is an ancient 4yr old unit with no wireless....but it works for me.

Leroy
10-25-2005, 09:17 PM
At our company we used to be able to keep our laptop when we got a new one, pretty nice! Now they take back and I'm sure the overstock is mostly corp PC's cleaned up!


Guess there are no good laptops anymore Ski36short! Funny :D
Especially now there is ethernet or wifi in every meeting room around Thomson so bringing your PC is like being at your desk still. I don't see many PDA's around our work anymore. Plenty of Blackberries.

RickDV
10-25-2005, 10:40 PM
I've been using a PDA for 7+ years. Get a new one every couple years (paid by the boss, thankfully). I use it for the usual calendar, address book, tasks, email.

Just got a Dell Axim wifi until a month ago. I keep work files on it, e.g. expense files, word documents, etc. Also have some music on it so I can listen to some tunes.

With the wifi I can even browse the web and have read TeamTalk from it.

Wouldn't care to be without it.

Ric
10-25-2005, 11:38 PM
palm III love it
theres probably better out there but I came from a franklin planner and couldnt stand forwarding all the stuff I didnt get done
use it for scheduling, address book and task lists... the usual

I dont "live" by it, but I'd probably be more effective if I did :D

NeilM
10-26-2005, 12:40 AM
Palm Treo 650. Company issue. Built in camera is good for blackmail ;) .

GSM phone works pretty much everywhere in UK, Canada, USA (which are the only places I need it).
Couldn't live without the wireless link (Goodlink) to email and calendar. Great to be able to get a jump on your email when waiting at airports or even in the elevator.

Laptop goes to a few meetings now, but the Palm goes everywhere.

jimmer2880
10-26-2005, 06:09 AM
I still have an old Palm Vx (actually - I just picked this puppy up 2 years ago after my old Vx died). Rather bullet-proof as long as you stay on top of keeping the digitizer lined-up.

I mainly use it for contacts & calendar reminders. Gave my wife my old Compaq Ipaq. She mainly uses it for calendar & contacts also. But - it does have a great voice recording feature for taking notes. Probably a bit over-kill for a Stay at home Mom, but I couldn't use it.

east tx skier
10-26-2005, 10:43 AM
Handspring. Great paperweight. Too bulky for me.

east tx skier
10-26-2005, 10:44 AM
palm III love it
theres probably better out there but I came from a franklin planner and couldnt stand forwarding all the stuff I didnt get done
use it for scheduling, address book and task lists... the usual

I dont "live" by it, but I'd probably be more effective if I did :D

My mom is such a franklin planner fanatic. She has a PDA and uses the FP software.

6ballsisall
10-26-2005, 10:52 AM
I am all about the Blackberry. I use it not only for email but calendar/planner, contact info, the whole nine yards. If I lost this thing my life would drastically change and I would have substantially less hair on my head.

M-Funf
10-26-2005, 11:34 AM
I use the Treo. I used to carry a laptop everywhere I went, but the Treo is much more user friendly, and I found that I didn't need a full function laptop.

Right now, I'm using the Treo 600, but my wife has the 650, and it's a much better device. It even integrates with the Bluetooth module in my car so I can do hands free, voice recognition, and address book on my Nav screen :D

Leroy
11-30-2005, 03:22 PM
Brace yourself Jeff!

http://money.cnn.com/2005/11/30/technology/rim.reut/index.htm?cnn=yes

I am all about the Blackberry. I use it not only for email but calendar/planner, contact info, the whole nine yards. If I lost this thing my life would drastically change and I would have substantially less hair on my head.

M-Funf
11-30-2005, 03:28 PM
Couldn't live without the wireless link (Goodlink) to email and calendar.

Neil,
I just got GoodLink on my Treo 600 last week, and WOW what a difference! :eek:

Now I just need to upgrade to a 650 so I have bluetooth...

Dan K
11-30-2005, 05:57 PM
I've had a palm M500 for years and use it all time for contact and schedule, I sync it up daily with my laptop schedule and home schedule.
My wife and two teenagers also have them and we beam important dates to each other during our 'calendar club days' that are for us all to get ourselves organized. works for us well. My wife could let go of the franklin for few months keeping up the palm and the planner just in case.
I would be lost with out it.

stevo137
11-30-2005, 06:57 PM
I used an Ipac for about 3 years and liked it but since I also use Blackberry and found it to be to much trouble to use both and have gone back to the good old Daytimers.
I still like the old fashioned 2 page per day planner for daily work for the simple fact that you store and keep the days notes and tasks that are written down. Many of our top people still use the good old Daytimers or Franklin along with their Blackberrys.
Both are good, just whatever works best for each individual.
I do miss the fact that I could keep certain docs on hand with me on a pocket pc vs having them on paper.

bigmac
11-30-2005, 07:19 PM
I am all about the Blackberry. I use it not only for email but calendar/planner, contact info, the whole nine yards. If I lost this thing my life would drastically change and I would have substantially less hair on my head.

jrandol, here are two important links for you...

Blackberry.... (http://money.cnn.com/2005/11/30/technology/rim.reut/index.htm?cnn=yes)

Contingency plan... (http://www.hairclub.com/mensindex1.htm)







-

Ryan
11-30-2005, 07:32 PM
I use my Co. Dell Axim for the usual calendar, email etc... I couldn't live without the reminders.
and also
Camera - with SD insert
MP3 Player - big SD card
Voice recorder
I want to download scriptures for church on another SD card, but naver take the time to do it.

stevo137
11-30-2005, 07:41 PM
I use my Co. Dell Axim for the usual calendar, email etc... I couldn't live without the reminders.
and also
Camera - with SD insert
MP3 Player - big SD card
Voice recorder
I want to download scriptures for church on another SD card, but naver take the time to do it.
Wonderful! Keep the "WORD" alive! ;)

BrianM
11-30-2005, 07:47 PM
I have a Treo 600 and use it for everything. Phone, address book, calendar, memos, quick internet searches, check my e-mail, games. Love the thing.

prostar205
11-30-2005, 11:06 PM
BLACKBERRY or as some people call it CRACKBERRY. It is adictive and I love it. I could not live without it. It does everything: email, calendar, contact data base, web surf, etc....

It does fall short in reading Excel spreadsheets and MS Word documents - but what the hell, that is what I have a laptop for.

I would not recommend T-Mobile service - it sucks.

LakePirate
12-01-2005, 12:12 AM
Had a Dell Axim and it was too bulky to carry. Now that I have the Blackberry I couldn't live without it.

*have a Dell Latitude 810 and love it *

milkmania
12-11-2005, 09:52 PM
yeah!:headbang:






Gradeschoolers Learning on Handhelds

By GARANCE BURKE
Associated Press Writer

December 10, 2005, 6:23 PM EST

OLATHE, Kan. -- Aesop's fables came beaming across the classroom and landed in Eva Hernandez's Palm handheld. On the bottom floor of Ridgeview Elementary School, she sat scrolling, using her stylus to navigate through through "The Flies and the Honeypot."

"Hmmm," said the 12-year-old. "I think I can animate the flies."

Eva, a sixth grader, is part of a new generation of kids using handhelds to read, write, do math, take pictures of the human eye or research Egyptian hieroglyphics -- all as a regular part of their curriculum.

As school districts scout ways to engage students already accustomed to instant messaging and interactive video games, they're buying up the kind of tech tools once reserved for jet-setting corporate executives.

Educational sales of personal digital assistants, laptop computers and handheld remote controls called "clickers" are ballooning nationwide. Last year, a survey by Quality Education Data Inc. found that 28 percent of U.S. school districts offered handhelds for student and teacher use. One of every four computers purchased by schools was a laptop.

One of the frontrunners was Yankton High School in South Dakota, which adopted Palm handhelds in 2001 and found they improved students' grades.

Electronic learning has become so popular that one school in Arizona went textbook-free this year, instead equipping its students with laptops. Seventeen schools outside Eugene, Ore., now use handhelds on most science field trips.

Eva Hernandez's district has spent $1.84 million to build "smart classrooms" with electronic interactive whiteboards, handheld computers, DVD-VHS players, high-definition sound and video systems and wireless keyboards and mice, all of which connect to the teacher's desktop computer. High schoolers use their Palms to write college applications and work through calculus problems. Nine-year-olds routinely "beam" in their homework, making the district a poster child for the digital classroom.

For Eric Johnson, who directs educational sales for Palm Inc., the manufacturer of Eva's Zire 71 model, public schools represent a $300 million market. And as schools purchase handhelds, dozens of spin-off industries are racing to integrate themselves into teachers' lesson plans.

Ridgeview Elementary, which sits in a squat building on the edge of this booming Kansas City suburb, bought Zire 71 and Zire 72 models for the fourth and sixth grades. Aside from their basic functions, the handhelds boast color screens, digital cameras, Internet capabilities and MP3 players. They can be easily hooked up to wireless keyboards.

Eva's teacher, Regan Veach, was one of the first in Kansas to embrace handhelds and now trains educators across the state.

Veach touts a new generation of educational software that makes the devices worthwhile.

Using a drawing and graphics application called TealPaint, students can animate their versions of Aesop's tales to transform a fable into a digital flipbook. Another program, Inspiration, lets students create clickable "mindmaps" to diagram ideas before they start writing, while Quizzler gives children instant feedback on multiple choice tests.

Veach's instructional process illustrates just how crucial the handhelds have become to everyday learning in Olathe schools.

First, she downloaded Aesop's Fables from a free online site and reformatted it using a program called ebookstudio that crunches it into a format the handhelds can read.

That left Eva and her classmates fidgeting with anticipation. Then, once Veach "synched" her Palm to her desktop and "beamed" the fables from student to student, excitement spilled through the room.

"My stepdad, he was like freaked out because he didn't get to use (the devices)," said Alejandro Najera, 11, as he selected colors from a rainbow template on his 3-inch screen. "Now whenever I go home, he's like, `What did you do with the Palms today'?"

Next was an exercise with the "clickers," handheld remotes that Veach uses to gauge students' progress. As pupils took a quiz to instantly test their understanding of Greek mythology, Veach got out a wireless whiteboard to write up the day's homework.

The day's assignments -- 90 minutes of reading and a few multiplication exercises -- were then wirelessly projected onto a roll-down screen at the front of the classroom and onto her desktop. The kids copied those notes down on paper -- in the sixth grade, they're not allowed to take the handhelds home.

Studies show that when used regularly, such media-rich instructional tools can work well to assess student performance.

But some worry that while children may learn to beam in their papers, this generation of "digital natives" could come up short in learning basic math, science and English.

"Despite the fact that we have spent gazillions of dollars in schools on technology, it's still just a leap of faith that kids are better educated because of that," said Robin Raskin, the founder and former editor of FamilyPC magazine. "Students need to have some opportunity to digest material serially, like reading a book from end to end. A tiny screen might stop you from being an analytic thinker 'cause you just can't see enough of a thing at once."

Ridgeview's principal, Kelly Ralston, is aware that technology won't erase the difficulties faced by her students, over half of whom come from low-income families.

Last year, she spent just one-third of her annual $63,000 budget for handhelds; the district has spent at least $952,000 to equip 4,000 students with the devices in the last four school years.

"The overall achievement is rising and the Palms have been a piece in keeping our kids engaged," said Ralston.

In the beginning, Palm Inc.'s early marketing efforts to K-12 classrooms and in supporting the development of educational applications gave it an edge over competitors.

But as handhelds gain expansion ports to add peripherals and built-in infrared e-mail and Internet capabilities, Windows-based "Pocket PC" handhelds such as Hewlett-Packard Co.'s iPAQ, Dell Inc.'s Axim and Toshiba Corp.'s Pocket PCs have started gaining ground.

Companies like Durham, N.C.-based Motricity Inc., a mobile content provider that sells books repackaged for several different handheld formats, stand to gain. The Olathe district purchased Motricity's classics collection and saved thousands of dollars on printed books.

But for Georgia Ross, who teaches special education math at Indian Trail Junior High in Olathe, the handhelds offer a way to reach students who struggle with traditional instruction methods.

"I don't know if it's that they feel cool or they're just jazzed about the technology," Ross said. "But having some of those bells and whistles make the kind of information they really need to learn exciting."