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east tx skier
10-25-2005, 11:50 AM
I'm reposting this "how to" posted on the Nicholl's board by "clemsondave." Seems to be a very good alternative to accusink (which is no longer made).

"Ok, here it goes. I went up there today and it really works awesome! When you get to the spot, you see nothing except the 55m's (working on that). We pulled up to the shore, found the end of the hose and used a battery powered compressor to pump the system up. It was really cool to watch the buoys pop up one at a time. The whole process took 9 min.
When we were done, we took the valve off and within 4 min, all the buoys were apx. 5-8' under water.
How it's done... I did not get a super close look, but here is my description. I will take some pics when I get a chance.

Fill 22 5 gallon buckets up with apx. 17lbs of rock. Put a small wheel/tire (apx. 10") inside the bucket with the rocks. Drill a hole in the top of the bucket and run a air line to the wheel. Each bucket is tied to the pvc under each buoy. Use T's to run the air hose to all the buckets. Run one end of the hose to shore or to a buoy that stays up. Put a bike schrader valve on it. Boom you got a submersible course.
There will be a little playing around with the right amount of rocks versus the size of the tire. The ones they used are surprisingly small (they fit in the 5gal bucket.) "

east tx skier
10-25-2005, 04:52 PM
As for how they let the air out.

"We have a T fitting near the fill valve. The T goes to a valve that can be left open to bleed the air out.

We used apx. 1/4" i.d. semi-rigid hose. One of the guys had some left over from a job, so no cost to us."

Leroy
10-25-2005, 05:46 PM
Doug;


Do you just take a regular course and add the inflation system and rocks to it?

east tx skier
10-25-2005, 06:18 PM
My understanding is that this setup was employed on a portable-style course (with the pvc arms). I suppose you could do it with an individually anchored setup if your water was deep enough.

He's going to upload pictures and a more specific write-up soon. I'll keep an eye out for it.

Basically, you need enough weight (rocks don't rust) to sink the buoys, and enough floatation to counteract the weight.

Cloaked
10-25-2005, 07:23 PM
A member here was kind enough to send me complete instructions for building a portable. I may try to incorporate this into the course I hope to build this winter. Come spring, I'd rather deflate it than remove it when done with the course. The Goobs here almost defy anyone to leave a course out, let alone the woodchuck fishermen...

Leroy
10-25-2005, 11:02 PM
There are already 4 sinking courses on my small lake, I'm trying to find out who they are. You would think they would be happy with extra people to help maintain and provide moral support for a course on the lake.

BuoyChaser
10-25-2005, 11:39 PM
sounds like an interesting setup...having just taken the pain of picking up a USED accusink system, definitely make sure there is no way to kink the air lines...with my used system found that slight cuts or kinks in the hard-wall tubing will leak air under pressure and allow water in under pressure!!!

sounds like an interesting alternative, but how are they keeping the wheel (i assume rim) from falling out the bottom of the 5gal bucket...

also have you seen plastic pails left in the water or outside for extended periods of time, UV LIGHT is awful on them...the submarine accusink has developed is really the KEY because you can't overfill the tubes with air making them float higher than you want...

chico
10-26-2005, 12:03 AM
Buoychaser do you have any problems with air lines or subs getting waterlogged.iI have an accusink system also but any time we get a leak and water gets in the subs will not sink.Now I use a vacuum pump to pull the air and water out and it sinks pretty quick.

Cloaked
10-26-2005, 12:54 AM
There are already 4 sinking courses on my small lake, I'm trying to find out who they are. You would think they would be happy with extra people to help maintain and provide moral support for a course on the lake.Leroy, you are from these parts. You know the culture and the fisherman's outlook on a slalom skier. It doesn't work here. They'll cut the balls and jug fish with them.... :eek:

Leroy
10-26-2005, 02:12 AM
Well Sporty, those balls would be great for many things.....and all of that rope....so many people have no respect for someone else's property. However, I bet it would work on Tellico lake.

Leroy, you are from these parts. You know the culture and the fisherman's outlook on a slalom skier. It doesn't work here. They'll cut the balls and jug fish with them.... :eek:

BuoyChaser
10-26-2005, 09:29 AM
Buoychaser do you have any problems with air lines or subs getting waterlogged.iI have an accusink system also but any time we get a leak and water gets in the subs will not sink.Now I use a vacuum pump to pull the air and water out and it sinks pretty quick.

i did have problems before i found out there were slight cuts/cracks in some of the airline...the system is very suseptible to air leaks/water leaks, because there is a very fine balance that needs to be met...

the reason only part of your course sinks, just like mine use to, is that the water VALVES OFF the air from escaping...

i would check the following:
1.) Do you have enough extra airline to make sure it is not kinking underwater? The directions recommend 2x the depth at the point of connection to the course.
2.) Go out on a calm day (NO WIND) and have 3-4 canoes or as many boats as you can up/down the course and feed line from shore. Look for the tiniest of air bubbles as the course is raised under pressure. That's where I found my feed line leaks, totally by accident.
3.) Be sure you're using PIPE DOPE and PLASTIC KWIK CLAMPS at every fitting connection. You wouldn't believe the small amount of air/water leak that can happen without these, especially if the system is tugged from wind or tight anchors or changing water levels.
4.) UV Light is killer on nylon air tubing. Be sure it is covered with BLACK WIRE WRAP or conduit from shore. A buddy has had his in the water for four years now and finding that his tubing is CRACKING from sunlight damage.

if anyone is interested in the installation instructions, PM me with your email and I'll send them to you as a *.PDF file...i've also found some great sources for buying replacement supplies, except for the submarines...

Jorski
10-26-2005, 11:28 AM
sounds like an interesting alternative, but how are they keeping the wheel (i assume rim) from falling out the bottom of the 5gal bucket...


You could bolt or wire the the wheel to the bottom of the bucket. It wouldn't matter if there were holes in the buckets.

Leroy
10-26-2005, 11:32 AM
Isn't there a problem with people trolling and hooking onto these courses, even submerged?

east tx skier
10-26-2005, 11:40 AM
Buoychaser, to answer one of your questions above ...

I think the tire/rim is inside the bucket with the rocks. There's a lid on the bucket and the airline goes through a hole in the lid. Thus, the tire and rocks are encased.

Leroy, I've been concerned about our course and the possibility of someone hooking the subs as the water is shallow and the subs and anchors stay in year round. So far, so good.

jimmer2880
10-26-2005, 07:35 PM
:popcorn:


This thread definitely has my wheels spinning.

east tx skier
10-31-2005, 01:23 PM
Many thanks to Clemsondave on the Nicholl's (http://waterski.nicholls.edu/waterski/) site.

"Basically, you need:

24 5 gal buckets
24 wheels/tires (that will fit in bucket)
lots of gravel (17lbs in each bucket)
lots of brass fittings (T's, couplers and stops)
1 schrader valve (like on a bike innertube)
lots of air tube (we used semi rigid tubing and ran it all the way to the shore)
some extra stainless cable (if you want to sink the 55m's)
30' or so of flexible clear tubing

The clear tubing slips tightly over the valves on the tires. Only need apx. 6" of this tubing. Use a coupler to connect it to the semi rigid tubing. Do this to all of the buckets/tires. Connect all together with T fittings.

You will have to experiment with the proper amount of gravel in the buckets to make it sink, but not so much that it will not come up. For us, it was 17lbs.

For the 55m's, we ran some stainless line along with the tubing out to the 55m's. We then took some rope, with a cinderblock attached and anchored it before you get to the 55m's. This keeps tension on them when they raise and lower.

I know these are not great instructions, but I am too lazy to write them all out. Most of it is self explanatory. If I find some time, I will draw it all out.

If you have specific questions, fire away. Just note that I did not design or install this system. However, I would be glad to help anyway I can."

east tx skier
10-31-2005, 01:27 PM
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east tx skier
10-31-2005, 01:28 PM
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east tx skier
10-31-2005, 01:29 PM
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east tx skier
10-31-2005, 01:30 PM
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TotalTom
08-11-2008, 05:39 PM
TTT

would love more feedback on the DIY system - costs? what kind of depth can you put it in? what about varying water levels?

does it sink to the bottom?

TIA

88 PS190
08-20-2008, 10:59 AM
TTT

would love more feedback on the DIY system - costs? what kind of depth can you put it in? what about varying water levels?

does it sink to the bottom?

TIA

Costs depend on where you source the materials. For example if you find a business that gets 5 gallon buckets of soap or whatever and you get them for free that's a big savings compared to purchasing 24 buckets.

For the float bladders they are using those wheels, walmart carries them, but I see no reason just the inner tube would not function well in this situation as long as all the tubes were the same type. Don't see it mentioned but you'll need to unscrew all the tire stems if you do use it.

Gravel is free if you know where to get it, and is just ballast you could pour concrete in milk jugs with a rope coming out and through the axle hole of the wheel and tied off in a similar manner. You are attempting to reach a point just higher than the buoyancy of the ball so everything sinks, I bet concrete could get you there, and a large lake stone stuck in there to use less concrete would lower cost.

The real cost will probably be felt in hose and of course having a portable course already.
Ideally a system like this would be set up with the ropes connecting the sinker weight to the boom measured so that they sit on the bottom at a certain point, this way if you install in say 20 feet of water your course only goes down 8 feet making raising it more doable.

Wally sinker had some interesting concepts as well.

NU-skier
08-20-2008, 11:12 AM
....For the float bladders they are using those wheels, walmart carries them, but I see no reason just the inner tube would not function well in this situation as long as all the tubes were the same type..


The wheels are used to restrict the inflation of each tube and force the air to the next unit. If you don't restrict the air, the tube will continue to inflate until it explodes or reaches the size of the vacant space left in the bucket. Too much air will cause the unit to float too high when inflated vs just lifting the sand/bucket enough to raise the course.

I would assume that the tires have holes drilled in them to allow the water pressure to deflate the tubes quickly when lowering the course unless they're tubless like a racing bike tire.

D3skier
08-20-2008, 11:35 AM
accusink was purchased by www.walleyskier.com

88 PS190
08-20-2008, 11:50 AM
http://www.wallyskier.com/

of course this version has soft bladders for the sand and air, and is marketed to use with a diaphragm pump to inflate/deflate.

Due to the soft airbladders the pump physically collapses them as the air is removed and can suck the water through the pump and out of the system. So even if the system has a slow leak it recovers itself, something the older system did not do.

Additionally separate weights vs. air means that the sand bladder can be dropped 15 feet below your pvc booms and their air bladders so that your airtube runs along mainline and boom and not down to the weight. and this lay out means the system reaches a max down posistion that you determine when the air is sucked out. Which is a good pump solution, if you can find a pump like wally's system you're in business.

DIY solution would eliminate buckets, attach wheels/tires to booms and have weights dropped on ropes below pvc.

chico
08-22-2008, 11:26 PM
I have an accusink system,with all the factory air lines,got the course in and guess what,all the air lines floated to the surface even tied to the cables,had to cut up 3/4" pipe and tie it all down the air lines to get it to sink,this is a high maintenance package,there isn`t too many times when you get the course raised and you spend an hour messin with it.