PDA

View Full Version : Winterizing in Atlanta


mgcbcn
10-23-2005, 08:14 PM
Newbies in Atlanta looking for some advice! We have a 1994 fuel injected Prostar 190 that we purchased earlier this year. We have no choice but to leave it outside (under cover) throughout the winter. If we need to winterize, is it something we can do ourselves? If we can do it ourselves what exactly do we need to do?

If we need to have a dealer winterize, does anyone know who the reputable service centers in the area are?

Thanks to everyone at Team Talk. We have learned a lot through the website during our first season of ownership!

erkoehler
10-23-2005, 08:16 PM
What is your mechanical level??? How familiar are you with the engines.

Leroy
10-23-2005, 08:25 PM
Nice looking boat!


First read the FAQ http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?p=103130#post103130 on winterization. The process described pretty well there. If questions then search as there has been a lot of discussion on winterization. Still stumped...ask away!

jclose8
10-23-2005, 10:32 PM
If I lived in Atlanta, my winterizing would be to drain the block and exhaust manifolds. That's it.
No fogging or removing the battery even.

Workin' 4 Toys
10-23-2005, 11:40 PM
How long will it sit unused? In reality, not your hopes. What you should do greatly depends on how long it will sit, and how low the temperatures get there. If I recall, there was snow there not but a year or two ago.

Weather has more drastic changes lately. As I have heard, there were parts of Texas last year, that saw snow for the first time ever recorded in history. I am sure the boat owners that store them there never saw that coming. So figure worst case scenario and we can get you at least in the right direction.

Tom023
10-24-2005, 12:35 AM
Winterization has two purposes, to protect from freezing and corrosion. Atlanta freezes so you need to drain the block, manifolds, hoses, etc. If the boat is going to sit without use for 4 months or longer, which it could easily do, then the normal corrosion inhibitors are good too, like fogging the cylinders, stabilizing the fuel and changing the oil. Prevention will go a long way.

NSXBill
10-24-2005, 09:17 AM
If it's going to sit outside, you must go with a full winterizing.

However, since living in Atlanta, my boats have lived in my garage, which rarely falls below 50F, so I never do a full winterizing. I usually add fuel stabilizer and will drain all the water if I'm going out of town over Christmas in case the power goes out. The boat usually goes no more than two months without being started over the winter. I like to have it ready for that nice unseasonably warm January boat ride!

Workin' 4 Toys
10-24-2005, 10:18 AM
I would like to think if it were me, and I knew it wasn't going to go below freezing, and my OFF season was very short, I'd probably run a fake a lake and run it once a month. But if it did sit for more than two months, it should be fogged, drained and antifreeze'd/anticorrosion'd up. JMO.

NSXBill
10-24-2005, 10:23 AM
I would like to think if it were me, and I knew it wasn't going to go below freezing, and my OFF season was very short, I'd probably run a fake a lake and run it once a month. But if it did sit for more than two months, it should be fogged, drained and antifreeze'd/anticorrosion'd up. JMO.

Count on going below freezing in ATL. Maybe not by far or for very long, but can jump into teens with little warning.

Workin' 4 Toys
10-24-2005, 10:51 PM
Better go the whole 9 yards.

mgcbcn
10-25-2005, 10:13 AM
Good information. It looks like we'll go ahead and get full winterization with the weather being crazy lately. We know just enough to "get by" as far as engines are concerned so we'll probably have a dealer do it for us (at least the first time).

Thanks again.

NSXBill
10-25-2005, 10:44 AM
where do you live in ATL?

LakePirate
10-25-2005, 11:01 AM
Once upon a time we had a cracked block due to not winterizing, we also had a cracked block due to the marina not winterizing like they were paid to do. If it sits outside, winterize. Do it. Do it. Do it.

east tx skier
10-25-2005, 11:02 AM
If it were my boat, I'd do everything listed in the checklist in the FAQ, but wouldn't bother with antifreeze. In certain parts of the country, I think antifreeze is more of a necessity than in others. I put Atlanta in the same category as Texas. It freezes, but it's not Fargo cold. But I also think the whole to AF or not to AF question boils down, to a certain extent, to personal preference. If it makes you feel better, then do it.

If you can use a wrench and a screwdriver, then you can winterize your boat. I'm not what you might call mechanically inclined, but I did fine with it last year and will do it again this year (probably sooner than later). Good luck.

*At the very very very least, I'd stabilize, change the oil, fog, and drain.

juju151
10-25-2005, 11:28 AM
Hey MGCBCN...that's a nice looking boat! I like the tower too...

I did a quick and dirty winterizing job last night to see how hard it's going to be...since I live in Atlanta too and will probably use the boat over the winter, I'm going to try just draining the block and manifolds and putting a drop light in the engine compartment with a 75 watt bulb to keep it warm. I'm sure that I'll be using it a couple of times a month over the winter.

Does anyone know what the deal is with the Knock Sensor??? I guess it's exactly what it's called...a sensor to detect the engine knocking??? Never seen one before, but it seems like a pain to have to unplug the wires and unscrew it from the block to drain the water every time and I'm sure it's not good for the threads in the block to keep unscewing it on a regular basis.

If you take it out and replace it with a drain plug like the other side of the engine has will the check engine light come on, or cause any other problems???

Is there a some kind of adapter that you can put in the block to allow both a drain and knock sensor to be installed together???

Thanks all!!!

east tx skier
10-25-2005, 11:32 AM
I wouldn't replace it with a plain old plug. I wrap all my plugs with teflon tape. Anybody know if that would have any sort of adverse effects if you did it to the threading on the knock sensor?

Also, at the very least , I would stabilize your fuel unless you're going to run a tank through every two weeks over the winter.

bigmac
10-25-2005, 11:34 AM
Hey MGCBCN...that's a nice looking boat! I like the tower too...

I did a quick and dirty winterizing job last night to see how hard it's going to be...since I live in Atlanta too and will probably use the boat over the winter, I'm going to try just draining the block and manifolds and putting a drop light in the engine compartment with a 75 watt bulb to keep it warm. I'm sure that I'll be using it a couple of times a month over the winter.

Does anyone know what the deal is with the Knock Sensor??? I guess it's exactly what it's called...a sensor to detect the engine knocking??? Never seen one before, but it seems like a pain to have to unplug the wires and unscrew it from the block to drain the water every time and I'm sure it's not good for the threads in the block to keep unscewing it on a regular basis.

If you take it out and replace it with a drain plug like the other side of the engine has will the check engine light come on, or cause any other problems???

Is there a some kind of adapter that you can put in the block to allow both a drain and knock sensor to be installed together???

Thanks all!!!



Yeah, you definitely need that knock sensor in case of any gasoline octane variations that might result in engine-damage knocking. I don't know if some kind of brass valve could be screwed into the block with a female fitting to screw the anti-knock sensor into.

Taking the knock sensor on and off is no big deal - just takes a 7/8 socket. Be careful putting it back in, though - it doesn't take much - about 16 ft-lbs. of torque. Personally, I actually used a torque wrench.

juju151
10-25-2005, 11:40 AM
I wouldn't replace it with a plain old plug.

Sorry about that ETS...again I wasn't clear with my post, but yeah...I wouldn't replace it with a plug, but a petcock...I'm not sure if that's how you spell it, but you know, a plug that is permanently installed in the block that allows you to drain without unscrewing the threads from the block.

If anyone makes something like that...a Y-fitting that also allows you to screw in the sensor into one side of it and a petcock to the other...that way you can drain and not worry about messing up the sensor or threads in the block.

That's what I always thought that the petcocks were there for, to easily drain the block and while eliminating the worry of messing up the threads in the block.

Just wondering...and trying to make my life a little easier. :smile:

juju151
10-25-2005, 11:45 AM
Yeah, you definitely need that knock sensor in case of any gasoline octane variations that might result in engine-damage knocking. Taking the knock sensor on and off is no big deal - just takes a 7/8 socket.

Ohhh...so it's a sensor to detect if the engine is "detonating" from bad gas, etc??? I thought it was to detect if the engine was actually KNOCKING...like a rod knock. I was thinking that if it was doing that I would hear it, ya know? I understand now...

Yeah, it wasn't that big of a deal to take out, and I was careful putting it back in...

east tx skier
10-25-2005, 11:57 AM
Yeah, that's what I meant. I wouldn't replace the knock sensor with anything but a knock sensor.

juju151
10-25-2005, 12:05 PM
Yeah, that's what I meant. I wouldn't replace the knock sensor with anything but a knock sensor.

:D Yeah, I guess I should just leave it alone, huh? :D

But you know...

If I can put a Chevy engine in my Datsun, which wasn't too hard, I think that my next project may be to put a radiator and electric fan in my MC, so I can run antifreeze all the time and not have to worry about all of this winterizing crap. That way I could use it anytime of year without worrying about it.

I wonder how that would look...a nice aluminum radiator mouted to my skylon??? :eek:

east tx skier
10-25-2005, 12:09 PM
Just don't forget to stabilize that gas.

juju151
10-25-2005, 12:11 PM
Just don't forget to stabilize that gas.

And I shouldn't worry about the stabil stuff messing up my fuel pump or injectors, right?

I worry too much, don't I??? ;)

JDK
10-25-2005, 12:35 PM
Is there a some kind of adapter that you can put in the block to allow both a drain and knock sensor to be installed together???


Yes.
A 1/4" npt close nipple, into the block, and a 1/4" npt tee. Screw the knock sensor into the run on the tee and 1/4" ball valve into another 1/4" close nipple on the branch of the tee.
All the fittings should be brass with tape or dope on the threads, and mine are not much more than finger tight (just enough so they don't leak).

David4MCSammyDuvall
10-25-2005, 12:36 PM
Hi ! Atlanta resident here at Snellville, Georgia. I usually get my boat winterizing by this guy who lives in Grayson, Georgia. I can't remember his name. I will look up my desk and get that information for you. He does work and repairs on boats in the warehouse in the backyard of his home. Very reliable. What part of Georgia do you live ?

east tx skier
10-25-2005, 12:37 PM
Quite frankly, I didn't know that that was an issue with fuel stabilizer. As of 2005, MasterCraft is still recommending stabilizing the fuel in its owner's manual. Whatever the downside, if any, of Sta-bil, it would need to be weighed against having old gas in your boat come Spring.

This is an example of what I've read about "old gas." It's not the only example, but it's consistent with what I've read.

Today's gasoline is formulated for day-to-day use in cars and trucks that burn through a full tank fairly quickly-it is not designed to be stored over long periods of time. When idle for a time, gasoline degradates (oxidation) past its useful shelf life, which results in gum formations or laquers to a yellowish liquid that coats the fuel tank pickup screen, the fuel filter, fuel lines, carburetor passages or fuel injection nozzle passages.

wetback
10-25-2005, 12:49 PM
I'm pretty sure when I read about the stabile stabilizer, it not only stabilizes the fuel but lubricates the fuel system. I think it is listed right on the bottle.

juju151
10-25-2005, 02:43 PM
Quite frankly, I didn't know that that was an issue with fuel stabilizer. As of 2005, MasterCraft is still recommending stabilizing the fuel in its owner's manual.

I thought that I had read a thread about the sta-bil was gumming up the electric fuel pumps...maybe that was a certain year and was taken care of though...I'll have to do a search and see if I can find that thead. Thanks for all the info ETS!!!

bigmac
10-25-2005, 03:22 PM
Ohhh...so it's a sensor to detect if the engine is "detonating" from bad gas, etc??? I thought it was to detect if the engine was actually KNOCKING...like a rod knock. I was thinking that if it was doing that I would hear it, ya know? I understand now...



Yeh, it's designed to detect knocking due to inadequate octane. If the knock sensor hears knocking, it retards the ignition timing.

mgcbcn
10-25-2005, 05:19 PM
We're in Marietta.

east tx skier
10-25-2005, 05:31 PM
I thought that I had read a thread about the sta-bil was gumming up the electric fuel pumps...maybe that was a certain year and was taken care of though...I'll have to do a search and see if I can find that thead. Thanks for all the info ETS!!!

Must have been year specific if that happened. My fuel pump is thirteen years old and doing fine (knock wood). I stabilize every gallon of gas that goes in my tank because (1) I don't burn through it quickly, and (2) I have a carb.

Lee Phillips
10-27-2005, 03:19 PM
I have brought my baby from California to Virginia and am learning about the winterizing process. I understand all the steps involved in draining the water, pulling antifreeze through etc. What I don't understand is how to Fog the engine. What do you use? I have a 2000 PS190 with the 330HP Northstar EFI

Confused in Virginia

east tx skier
10-27-2005, 03:25 PM
Fogging oil or Marvel's Mystery Oil. At least that's what my manual says. Read something here recently about there being reasons you might not want to fog some engines. Probably worth exploring. The current manual says to fog and doesn't except any engines though.

planoboy
10-27-2005, 03:38 PM
fittings btween knock sensor and block, read this...
http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=1143&highlight=knock+sensor