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TxsRiverRat
09-23-2013, 11:02 AM
We’re in the beginning stages of brainstorming for a ski dock restoration for the club... A couple of ideas in our heads were what to use as far as materials... Those of you that have built docks, here are the questions:

1. Do you prefer the marine treated wood or do do you prefer a synthetic lumber? Is there a huge difference between the two cost wise / durability wise?

2. If you go with marine treated wood, I was looking into nonskid paint. I see Cabela’s and Overton's offer it for $80-90 per gallon. Is there a better /more durable product for less money? Has anyone used either of these products can vouch for it? Durable? How long does it last? Does it peel off or look like ‘carp’ when it does? What I definitely would not want is a maintenance nightmare.

3. New regulations require utilizing encapsulated foam. Does anyone have a cheap resource? Also, is there a good way to calculate the amount needed? When we bought some for our jump restoration, it was a little too much and we had to counterweight the jump with anchors to put it at the right height.

Thanks in advance

MC

russlars
09-23-2013, 11:37 AM
To answer one of your questions I would highly recommend composite decking attached with stainless steel fasteners. This will be the lowest maintenance for you and eliminate regular staining, splinters, etc. Several types have a embossed wood grain with them that make them look more like real wood and the raised grain makes them non slip. The product I have used on my dock and several decks is Evergrain. It has low expansion/contraction and has held up well to our Northwest weather. A nice way to attach this is with stainless steel screws called Headcoat. They have a painted head to match the material and when drilled correctly sit nice and flush. The lack of maintenance alone will pay for he increased cost of the material.

TxsRiverRat
09-23-2013, 11:46 AM
That evergrain is eye candy - wow - that is nice stuff!

Any idea on cost per sf? a quick glance on the website does not show it.

russlars
09-23-2013, 01:32 PM
That evergrain is eye candy - wow - that is nice stuff!

Any idea on cost per sf? a quick glance on the website does not show it.
Iirc about $2-2.50 per lineal foot for the 6" wide decking that is 1" thick. They also have some nice colors if you want to do a different color for a surround or accents. Really easy to cut and work with. It is fairly heavy though so you need some good floats for your dock.

east tx skier
09-23-2013, 02:59 PM
My father in law used composite decking and stainless hardware on his dock. The piers and substructure was treated plywood. 10 years later and it still looks great. He also affixed tar paper to the upward facing surfaces in the pier and substructure to allow water to run off.

CC2MC
09-23-2013, 03:24 PM
My father built one with marine wood and it is a very nice dock but over the past three years or so, it has had quote a bit of shrinkage. I tried to prolong the life of my deck at my house by putting the non skid surface and it seems to work well, but is really a pain to paint on, especially if you do it after the fact. Doing it before wouldn't be so bad but if you are spending the extra money, I would put it into composite decking. No rotting to worry about. It is denser than wood and tends to get prretyy warm in the sun but that is something pretty minor.

TRBenj
09-23-2013, 05:30 PM
What is "marine wood" or "marine treated wood"? I have never heard of those terms.

Skir68
09-23-2013, 05:39 PM
We have a "TREX" deck, it's 11 years old. Last summer, we power washed it, it still looks brand new. No warpage at all. I think that's pretty good considering the extreme weather patterns of Minnesota. It could be 40-50 below zero in the winter months to 100 plus in the summer. Of course YMMV and it is $$$ but Its worth it for ZERO maintenance!

TxsRiverRat
09-23-2013, 05:50 PM
What is "marine wood" or "marine treated wood"? I have never heard of those terms.

Probably a difference in nomenclature... I am referring to a treated / pressure treated wood. Our current dock has been in use for the last 10 years with the wood currently on it.

We have a "TREX" deck, it's 11 years old. Last summer, we power washed it, it still looks brand new. No warpage at all. I think that's pretty good considering the extreme weather patterns of Minnesota. It could be 40-50 below zero in the winter months to 100 plus in the summer. Of course YMMV and it is $$$ but Its worth it for ZERO maintenance!

Trex = also gorgeous material - estimate on cost?

My father built one with marine wood and it is a very nice dock but over the past three years or so, it has had quote a bit of shrinkage. I tried to prolong the life of my deck at my house by putting the non skid surface and it seems to work well, but is really a pain to paint on, especially if you do it after the fact. Doing it before wouldn't be so bad but if you are spending the extra money, I would put it into composite decking. No rotting to worry about. It is denser than wood and tends to get prretyy warm in the sun but that is something pretty minor.

thats what I was thinking...

Iirc about $2-2.50 per lineal foot for the 6" wide decking that is 1" thick. They also have some nice colors if you want to do a different color for a surround or accents. Really easy to cut and work with. It is fairly heavy though so you need some good floats for your dock.

we are required to use encapsulated foam now, so add $$$ to the tab :rolleyes:

My father in law used composite decking and stainless hardware on his dock. The piers and substructure was treated plywood. 10 years later and it still looks great. He also affixed tar paper to the upward facing surfaces in the pier and substructure to allow water to run off.

definitely stainless - we need repairs to be easy... :)

Aric'sX15
09-23-2013, 06:25 PM
I think the grey trex is like 40 bucks a board? We had it on our boat dock that was built in 05, and it still looks new.

tex
09-23-2013, 07:59 PM
Bigger is better!

73blue
09-23-2013, 09:51 PM
If you want low maintenance, frame it out and pour a 3" concrete slab. Put floats under it, and you're done forever. It sounds a little crazy, but my entire marina is poured concrete. It is extremely stable and little to no maintenance. The cost will compare favorably against any of the composite decking you are looking at. You will need a few extra floats. What size dock are we talking? How high do you want it to float?

TRBenj
09-24-2013, 08:41 AM
Probably a difference in nomenclature... I am referring to a treated / pressure treated wood. Our current dock has been in use for the last 10 years with the wood currently on it.
Gotcha. Its referred to as "pressure treated" wood around here. Commonly used for docks, decks, etc.

I am familiar with "marine plywood", which has no allowance for internal voids like the grades used for construction- making it appropriate for use in a boat hull. Its not treated in any way, though. I figured that wasnt what you were referring to.

BrianM
09-24-2013, 09:05 AM
We have redone both of our dock, ramp and ski, since 2005. We did the ski dock first. It was built completely out of treated wood. We have since used a product called Restore on the top deck for non skid and to help preserve the top decking. We have the corners of the dock where we have our swim ladder and put on skis carpeted since the non skid is rough on the bottom of equipment. 7 years later it is still in pretty good shape although we have had to do some repair here and theer to the top deck boards.

The smaller dock at our ramp has a pressure treated frame with synthetic deck. MUCH better than our ski dock but it was cost prohibitive at the time to do our ski dock with the synthetic deck boards. The boards are about 6 times the cost of pressure treated and you also have additional framing costs due to the fact the synthetic can not span as far. This dock still looks like new with the exception of a little dirt. We generally just pressure wash once a year.

Both of our docks are floating on the plastic 55 gallon drums which we sourced from our local Chemdry. They work great and are very inexpensive.

I would highly reccomend the synthetic decking if you can swing the expense.

maxpower220
09-24-2013, 11:11 AM
Most of the new syn decking have side access for screws, there will be no screws showing on top, it looks really good. SS screws are definitely the way to go.

I found the cost of syn to be more than 4Xs the price, so I went with lumber. I used no space between boards, it looks good as there is shrinkage.

TxsRiverRat
09-24-2013, 12:03 PM
Bigger is better!

We have to make the dock show-ski proof (jk jk jk man lmao)

I'll be calling you for the work parties to rebuild it, Mikey... (seriously, I will!) ;)

If you want low maintenance, frame it out and pour a 3" concrete slab. Put floats under it, and you're done forever. It sounds a little crazy, but my entire marina is poured concrete. It is extremely stable and little to no maintenance. The cost will compare favorably against any of the composite decking you are looking at. You will need a few extra floats. What size dock are we talking? How high do you want it to float?

Thanks, but concrete weighs wayyyy too much... our dock is heavy enough as it is and we have to have the ability to move in in/out from the shoreline based on the lake level.

We have redone both of our dock, ramp and ski, since 2005. We did the ski dock first. It was built completely out of treated wood. We have since used a product called Restore on the top deck for non skid and to help preserve the top decking. We have the corners of the dock where we have our swim ladder and put on skis carpeted since the non skid is rough on the bottom of equipment. 7 years later it is still in pretty good shape although we have had to do some repair here and theer to the top deck boards.

The smaller dock at our ramp has a pressure treated frame with synthetic deck. MUCH better than our ski dock but it was cost prohibitive at the time to do our ski dock with the synthetic deck boards. The boards are about 6 times the cost of pressure treated and you also have additional framing costs due to the fact the synthetic can not span as far. This dock still looks like new with the exception of a little dirt. We generally just pressure wash once a year.

Both of our docks are floating on the plastic 55 gallon drums which we sourced from our local Chemdry. They work great and are very inexpensive.

I would highly reccomend the synthetic decking if you can swing the expense.

Brian - great reply - can you post pics of both your docks? Thanks! I'd like to see your swim ladder and ski rack especially.

Most of the new syn decking have side access for screws, there will be no screws showing on top, it looks really good. SS screws are definitely the way to go.

I found the cost of syn to be more than 4Xs the price, so I went with lumber. I used no space between boards, it looks good as there is shrinkage.

Thank you!

BrianM
09-24-2013, 01:16 PM
Here is the only photo I have of our launch dock. This one has the synthetic deck boards. I'll look around for photos of our ski dock or take a couple of photos of it the next time I am out there.

The ladder on our ski doc is a custom stainless piece one of our members built many years ago. It has outlasted at least 4 different docks. Our ski racks are very simple. We hang some 2x4 vertically down from the rafters of our roof and then use two pieces of 3/4" galvanized pipe spaced far enough apart to accommodate ski bindings. The pipe just sits in a drilled hole of the 2x4 and is held in place by galvanized end caps on both sides. We wrap the pipe with foam pipe insulation. Works great.

Kyle
09-24-2013, 02:36 PM
Bigger is better!

Agree 100%

Wider and longer........just like she said ;)

TxsRiverRat
09-24-2013, 05:10 PM
Thanks for the pic, yes i'd liked to see some more pics - gives us great ideas!

georgea0731
09-24-2013, 09:12 PM
Its thick, and a little rough, but looks better than my 15 year old wood. I'm thinking about trying it.

atihanyi
09-24-2013, 09:33 PM
my brother had a connection with a company that refurbishes semi trailers they used a plywood coated in fiberglass cloth on both sides . That stuff was seriously durable and non skid but you needed to paint the cut ends with polyester resin to make them last

TxsRiverRat
09-25-2013, 11:43 AM
Plans are developing quickly and we're putting a plan together to present to the members, as expenses over a certain dollar amount requires majority approval.

Kyle took measurements last night and the idea we have is to convert 2 smaller docks into one large dock... this is gonna be a fun end of season project.

MC

thatsmrmastercraft
09-25-2013, 11:52 AM
Plans are developing quickly and we're putting a plan together to present to the members, as expenses over a certain dollar amount requires majority approval.

Kyle took measurements last night and the idea we have is to convert 2 smaller docks into one large dock... this is gonna be a fun end of season project.

MC

Who smashed a thumb or drives a nail through their hand with a nail gun first...........you or Kyle?:rolleyes::D:D

BrianM
09-25-2013, 03:49 PM
Still no photo but our ski dock is 20x24 and we have a 12x12 metal roof covered section in the middle. We have room for three boats to dock and then the swim side.

How big are you going?

BARE5
09-25-2013, 07:21 PM
If the team has the money, go with the Flote Dock synthetic plastic, lifetime warranty, our club just invested over 14k this year. But it's a water level dock. It floats, no need to worry about drought conditions . Our old dock was rebuilt about 11 times in the past 15 yrs .