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Zad
09-19-2013, 12:10 PM
A toilet plunger perfectly represents how I feel about winterizing...seems like the season just got going. I have read a bunch on this topic and the fake "fake-a-lake" option that I like best is to fit a garden hose to a toilet plunger, suction the toilet plunger over the hull opening of the raw water intake (maybe prop it up with a 2x4 or just have my wife watch to make sure it doesn't fall off), attach a garden hose to the toilet plunger, fill a large outdoor garbage can with water and place it under one of the exhaust ports at the back of the boat (to catch 1/2 the exhaust water) and place the other end of the 8' garden hose in the water-filled garbage can, start the engine with water running into the garbage can. Will this work? I am concerned the suction of the raw water pump will collapse the garden hose or just not supply enough water. Should I just use a larger hose? If so, what size?

epnault
09-19-2013, 12:25 PM
This is the way I do it. Here is my homemade instructions.




Step 1 - Find a 5 gallon bucket

Step 2 - Buy a 2ft section of PVC pipe
http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053

Step 3 - get 2 of these couplers 2" to 1 1/4"
http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1...atalogId=10053

Step 4 - Find a plastic fitting you can mount to the bottom side of your bucket that has an end that is 1 1/4 ID that you can mount to the coupler above and epoxy (or use marine GOO) to the bucket (you will need to drill a hole of course).

Step 5 - Stick a garden hose into your bucket and mount the system up to the boat-I have a DD so it was a straight shot. You may have to get creative with V-drive.

mgs96ps
09-19-2013, 12:29 PM
I would attach tsunami pump to garbage can to feed plunger.

thatsmrmastercraft
09-19-2013, 12:32 PM
My bucket method uses flexible hose to connect to the transmission cooler inlet. Transmission pump is turning and I like to have the cooling function. This also performance tests the entire water intake system.

I have a valve where the hose attaches to the tub for filling and holding while not running.

Tub then gets filled with RV antifreeze to winterize. I time ending amount of antifreeze with killing the engine with fogging oil.

VP46
09-19-2013, 12:40 PM
I have nothing to add except - glad I live where there is no concern about a deep freeze. That is all.

thatsmrmastercraft
09-19-2013, 12:41 PM
Typically when people are using a plunger, they are hooking it directly to a garden hose.

mikeg205
09-19-2013, 01:18 PM
I hook mine up before transmission. added flexible hose to it... so i can leave the raw water hose attached to bottom of boat.

Rockman
09-19-2013, 01:39 PM
Key is not to use a 100 foot hose from your faucet!

I just pull the port size intake hose off and connect this and a garden hose to the end. Use a 5/8 in garden hose. Have not had a problem with the hose being sucked together.

This is what they use at the dealer.

ricford
09-19-2013, 04:36 PM
Key is not to use a 100 foot hose from your faucet!

I just pull the port size intake hose off and connect this and a garden hose to the end. Use a 5/8 in garden hose. Have not had a problem with the hose being sucked together.

This is what they use at the dealer.

I made one of those, too. Works perfectly.

shunra
09-19-2013, 06:29 PM
I tried it with the plunger and a bucket and I couldn't get a good enough seal on the plunger for the boat to actually suck up through the plunger. Most times people use plungers they are hooked up to a pressurized water supply, not a bucket, so the seal isn't as critical.

What I suggest doing is putting the bucket of antifreeze in the boat and connecting a hose from the bucket directly to your raw water intake one way or another. In the past I have just pulled the raw water hose off the through hull fitting and stuck that big hose directly into the bucket of antifreeze. That works like a charm and it is only 2 hose clamps that need to be removed.

MattsCraft
09-19-2013, 09:40 PM
You can do it with a standard toilet plunger, no inner flange. I have a perko now, however it can be done. I used the plunger, had my old rabbit ears from my I/O - removed the hose connection from that, cut a hole in the side of the plunger, stuck it through, silicone it in.

Trick is to have the hose portion pointed directly at the scupper. Plenty of water for about a 15 minute engine run before temp started to rise.

east tx skier
09-19-2013, 09:48 PM
Skip the plunger. They don't seal well and are prone to falling over. Unless you're keeping a close eye on things, you could run dry and not know it.

Bucket fed by a garden hose and a 1.25" flexible PVC hose to the transmission cooler or the water pump (whichever is first) takes all of a minute to get set up and is infinitely reliable.

blackhawk
10-03-2013, 05:02 PM
Is it really necessary to put a hole in the bottom of the bucket to hook up to the raw water intake. If you just had a flexible hose connected to the raw water intake, couldn't you just stick it down into the bucket? I would think that the raw water pump would have enough head to pull the water out of the bucket without gravity's help.

Other idea that I had was to place a long rectangular Rubbermaid tub behind the boat under the exhaust flaps. Then run a flexible hose from the raw water intake, out, up, and over, down to the tub. This way you could re-circulate the water until the water started getting too hot. Anyone tried this? Should work if the raw water pump has enough head capacity.

east tx skier
10-03-2013, 05:17 PM
Is it really necessary to put a hole in the bottom of the bucket to hook up to the raw water intake. If you just had a flexible hose connected to the raw water intake, couldn't you just stick it down into the bucket? I would think that the raw water pump would have enough head to pull the water out of the bucket without gravity's help.

Other idea that I had was to place a long rectangular Rubbermaid tub behind the boat under the exhaust flaps. Then run a flexible hose from the raw water intake, out, up, and over, down to the tub. This way you could re-circulate the water until the water started getting too hot. Anyone tried this? Should work if the raw water pump has enough head capacity.

I just stick the flexible hose into the bucket.

JimN used to talk about how they had a big catch can of antifreeze. But like you mention, with water, you're going to get to the end of its cooling capacity pretty fast. Easier to take what you collect and just water the lawn with it or something.

thatsmrmastercraft
10-03-2013, 05:24 PM
Is it really necessary to put a hole in the bottom of the bucket to hook up to the raw water intake. If you just had a flexible hose connected to the raw water intake, couldn't you just stick it down into the bucket? I would think that the raw water pump would have enough head to pull the water out of the bucket without gravity's help.

Other idea that I had was to place a long rectangular Rubbermaid tub behind the boat under the exhaust flaps. Then run a flexible hose from the raw water intake, out, up, and over, down to the tub. This way you could re-circulate the water until the water started getting too hot. Anyone tried this? Should work if the raw water pump has enough head capacity.

You do not have to drill a hole in the bottom of the pail. Running a hose over the top works just fine. I use a tub and have a small hole drilled through to secure a 1x2 which I zip-tie the garden hose and the hose that goes to the oil cooler. Could just as easily duct tape the hose to a rock to keep them at the bottom. I have a valve at the top of the tub to regulate water flow into the tub.

markmcfarland
10-03-2013, 07:15 PM
I always disconnected the intake hose from the brass hose barb where it came through the boat. Is there any problem with this? Would stick garden hose in intake hose allowing excess water to drain in bilge. When time for antifreeze I would dump in bucket and suck out. When empty shut off engine. Is there a reason I shouldn't do it this way.

Lumbergh
10-05-2013, 04:51 PM
Bucket is best IMHO. 5g or larger, its not rocket science.

mikeg205
10-05-2013, 06:42 PM
once you run a bucket - and see it drain with the hose filling bucket and not keeping up you will be converted....

Zad
10-06-2013, 09:50 PM
Well, just finished my first winterization on my 2002 xstar. Filled a roughneck tub with water and kept the hose running. Ran a 1.25" hose from tub to water pump where raw water line connects. Ran the engine until temp reached 150 degrees. Changed oil. Ran again to get temps up. Shut off then emptied the tub of water and filled with 6 gallons of boat antifreeze and fired it up again and ran until the pink stuff came out the exhaust. Fogged engine.

Then did the ballast system which has a ball valve shutoff upstream from a T that allowed me to attach a short length of garden hose with the other end in a gallon of marine antifreeze. Ran each ballast pump until the antifreeze came through into a catch basin. Cleaned up and put the tarp on.

Am I done? Must admit, it is a bit freaky wondering if the antifreeze got to all the necessary places. Any suggestions on something I missed or should double check?

mikeg205
10-06-2013, 10:06 PM
Well, just finished my first winterization on my 2002 xstar. Filled a roughneck tub with water and kept the hose running. Ran a 1.25" hose from tub to water pump where raw water line connects. Ran the engine until temp reached 150 degrees. Changed oil. Ran again to get temps up. Shut off then emptied the tub of water and filled with 6 gallons of boat antifreeze and fired it up again and ran until the pink stuff came out the exhaust. Fogged engine.

Then did the ballast system which has a ball valve shutoff upstream from a T that allowed me to attach a short length of garden hose with the other end in a gallon of marine antifreeze. Ran each ballast pump until the antifreeze came through into a catch basin. Cleaned up and put the tarp on.

Am I done? Must admit, it is a bit freaky wondering if the antifreeze got to all the necessary places. Any suggestions on something I missed or should double check?


If you're not comfortable with the amount of RV anti freeze you ran - run some more.. :) - cheap insurance.. right.. :) -

Zad
10-06-2013, 11:16 PM
Isn't it necessary to get the engine up to operating temperature before running the antifreeze through? Something about thermostats opening? If so, wouldn't it be a waste of time to run more antifreeze through?

mikeg205
10-07-2013, 07:32 AM
Yes.. you are correct... or you could pull the t-stat and pour atf thru housing... just need a new gasket -

Burbon66
10-07-2013, 08:08 AM
I have nothing to add except - glad I live where there is no concern about a deep freeze. That is all.

Yep me too. All I need to do is disconnect the battery and put the cover on for winter.

BrooksfamX2
10-07-2013, 10:05 AM
Heated garage..... nuff said...... 8p

Zad
10-07-2013, 10:22 AM
To stop the worry, I pulled one of the block plugs and AF came out. Did the same with the risers or manifolds, whatever they are called and AF there too so I guess the T-stat opened. Anything else I should check?

MattsCraft
10-07-2013, 05:11 PM
Well, just finished my first winterization on my 2002 xstar. Filled a roughneck tub with water and kept the hose running. Ran a 1.25" hose from tub to water pump where raw water line connects. Ran the engine until temp reached 150 degrees. Changed oil. Ran again to get temps up. Shut off then emptied the tub of water and filled with 6 gallons of boat antifreeze and fired it up again and ran until the pink stuff came out the exhaust. Fogged engine.

Then did the ballast system which has a ball valve shutoff upstream from a T that allowed me to attach a short length of garden hose with the other end in a gallon of marine antifreeze. Ran each ballast pump until the antifreeze came through into a catch basin. Cleaned up and put the tarp on.

Am I done? Must admit, it is a bit freaky wondering if the antifreeze got to all the necessary places. Any suggestions on something I missed or should double check?

? - Did you drain the block water prior to running on antifreeze? If not you have at least 50% diluted antifreeze in the block. This is an important step or you need to start with a much higher freeze rating antifreeze. If you started with -25, I would suggest just dry blocking from here, empty the J hose and tranny elbow, blow out the heater if you have one and you would be safe.

thatsmrmastercraft
10-07-2013, 05:17 PM
? - Did you drain the block water prior to running on antifreeze? If not you have at least 50% diluted antifreeze in the block. This is an important step or you need to start with a much higher freeze rating antifreeze. If you started with -25, I would suggest just dry blocking from here, empty the J hose and tranny elbow, blow out the heater if you have one and you would be safe.

Not a good plan to go through a Canadian winter without a healthy dose of antifreeze in the block. Dry is not usually an option.

Zad
10-07-2013, 05:22 PM
I did not drain before pumping full of AF. Will repeat the process again with a drain after bringing up to temp.

blackhawk
10-08-2013, 05:54 PM
I have been debating about sucking in antifreeze with the engine running or just pulling off the hoses at the thermostat housing and filling them with antifreeze. The latter is the way that I did my previous boat and it worked well. It had a GM vortec V6 with an outdrive. After I completely drained the block of water. I would take off the large hose at the thermostat housing and pour in antifreeze until it ran out the outdrive exhaust. It would take about 2 gallons, so you know it was filling up the block. Then I would remove the two smaller hoses and do the same thing. These would take about a 1/2 gallon before coming out of the exhaust. This was how a professional marine service guy taught me how to do it.

I haven't looked that closely at the MCX 350 engine yet, but shouldn't that same procedure work to fill the block on it?

My only worry is that if I run it up to temperature with water and then drain the block, that the engine would cool down enough to close the thermostat.

Zad
10-08-2013, 06:29 PM
I wondered the same thing about the engine cooling down and the thermostat closing. I just repeated it all today again: running up to temp, draining the block and risers, adding 6 gallons of AF to the bucket, running until the AF was sucked up and fogging at the end. The time between shutting the engine down at 140 degrees, draining and starting up again was about 5 minutes and I hope to heck that wasn't enough time for the T-stat to close - I doubt it with all the mass of iron heated up. The boat is now in storage but easily reached so if this niggles at me I will go up and check the block/risers/t-stat hoses just to make sure there is AF in there. Steep learning curve as with all things new. Hopefully not so steep that I end up with something cracked.

blackhawk
10-08-2013, 08:04 PM
Zad - For peace of mind, you could loosen the hoses at the thermostat housing one at a time. Just crack them loose a little bit and if AF runs out your are good. If you don't see AF, just pull the hose off, pour in AF until it fills up the hose or comes out the exhaust.

Zad
10-08-2013, 10:10 PM
Ok, will do.

Zad
10-12-2013, 04:58 AM
I checked out the engine winterization by opening the garden hose connector that connects the riser drain hoses at the front of the motor and out came AF. Then I disconnected the large hose coming off the t-stat housing and it too had AF in it so I believe the t-stat stayed open when I switched to AF after draining the block and running the motor. Good to go until spring. Thanks for all your help.