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Squash20
09-01-2013, 10:44 PM
Hey everyone....I know, sucks to be thinking about it, but I'm planning for the inevitable and had a few questions. I've been playing around a little and think I've got a decent process mapped out when the time comes...and just wanted to see what a few others might think. I've got a PS197. I just rigged up my homemade version of a "fake-a-lake" with an old cooler (water tank) and some fittings....keeping the cooler/tank full with a garden hose water source. It seems to work really well running the engine and sucking water from the "cooler tank" that I've created. My plan, when the time comes, will be to get water drawing through to get the engine/thermostat up to temp (engine at idle only of course). That appears to take about 5 to 10 minutes or so from the 1 trial run that ive done....carefully watching the water source to ensure that isnt starved and watching engine temp. Once at temp (around 140 degrees) I plan to shut down the engine and manually drain the engine of all raw water and then switch my cooler tank over to RV pink antifreeze (100%, not diluted). Then, re-fire the engine and draw a good 8 gallons of RV antifreeze through and shut her down. I had planned on keeping the antifreeze in the engine then (not draining) for the winter. I suppose I would just pop open the block drain plugs to make sure they show antifreeze in them as a precaution, but not draining entirely as I understand the antifreeze has rust inhibitor in it that should help protect for the winter. Does this sound like an adequate plan? I don't have any hot shower or heaters....so it is just the engine that I'm working with. The other standard maintenance will follow as well (fuel filter, engine oil/filter, all other lubrication procedures, removing water pump, etc, etc). Let me know what you all think. Thanks!

ricford
09-01-2013, 10:55 PM
Sounds about right to me. Change the oil while the engine is still warm. The oil will flow out easier. I don't understand the removing of the water pump part, though. If you mean remove the impeller, won't all your antifreeze run out?

Squash20
09-01-2013, 11:05 PM
Yeah... I meant impeller...I suppose I could just leave it in and replace it in the spring. I don't think I'll lose much antifreeze if I remove it. Maybe just whatever is in the line up to and around the water pump, but everything else in the block and manifolds should be fine and should not be affected. I've removed the water pump impeller cover before just to check the impeller and replace the gasket and it didn't seem to lose much water, so I thought opening and removing it as part of the winterization process would be OK. Thanks for the feedback!

Jerseydave
09-01-2013, 11:11 PM
Hey everyone....I know, sucks to be thinking about it, but I'm planning for the inevitable and had a few questions. I've been playing around a little and think I've got a decent process mapped out when the time comes...and just wanted to see what a few others might think. I've got a PS197. I just rigged up my homemade version of a "fake-a-lake" with an old cooler (water tank) and some fittings....keeping the cooler/tank full with a garden hose water source. It seems to work really well running the engine and sucking water from the "cooler tank" that I've created. My plan, when the time comes, will be to get water drawing through to get the engine/thermostat up to temp (engine at idle only of course). That appears to take about 5 to 10 minutes or so from the 1 trial run that ive done....carefully watching the water source to ensure that isnt starved and watching engine temp. Once at temp (around 140 degrees) I plan to shut down the engine and manually drain the engine of all raw water and then switch my cooler tank over to RV pink antifreeze (100%, not diluted). Then, re-fire the engine and draw a good 8 gallons of RV antifreeze through and shut her down. I had planned on keeping the antifreeze in the engine then (not draining) for the winter. I suppose I would just pop open the block drain plugs to make sure they show antifreeze in them as a precaution, but not draining entirely as I understand the antifreeze has rust inhibitor in it that should help protect for the winter. Does this sound like an adequate plan? I don't have any hot shower or heaters....so it is just the engine that I'm working with. The other standard maintenance will follow as well (fuel filter, engine oil/filter, all other lubrication procedures, removing water pump, etc, etc). Let me know what you all think. Thanks!

I do almost exactly what you have stated, but I change the oil and trans fluid first.
I also use -60 purple anti freeze from West Marine, only 4 gals. (8 gals. seems excessive)
Remove spark plugs and fog cylinders.
Replace impeller every 2 years in the spring.

Squash20
09-01-2013, 11:25 PM
Thanks Dave. So, you don't fog through the throttle body, but rather direct into the cylinder, eh? After removing the spark plugs, do you just add the fogging solution and then replace the plugs and turn over the engine a few times (tether removed to avoid from the engine firing)? Then replace plugs in the spring and it fires right up? I was thinking about fogging the engine but wasn't sure as it seems to be about a 50/50 split between guys doing it and others not. Sounds like a good idea to me.

mikeg205
09-02-2013, 11:18 AM
Since this is now September 2 -- winterization questions are acceptable.. I have 2 more months ;)


Here's some procedures...

http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showpost.php?p=103139&postcount=6

TBI is a wet intake so some fogging should be done there... some ATF or Marvel (MMO) should be done...

johnboat
09-04-2013, 09:54 PM
Good idea, what size cooler are you using? I agree on removing plugs and fogging the cylinders.

Squash20
09-05-2013, 08:19 PM
Hey John...I'm not exactly sure the size of the cooler (no markings on it) but if I had to guess its probably about a 60 quart (15 gallon) cooler. It works great. Fits perfectly in the boat and I literally walked into the Ace Hardware store down the road and had the fittings in my hand in about 5 minutes to convert from the cooler drain (standard garden hose diameter) to the 1 1/4" water intake hose on the boat. I think the fittings were about $7 total. Hook it up, fill the cooler and keep the hose running to keep the cooler tank full. Very easy and surprisingly not even that loud on land. And here I was thinking that I would be bothering the neighbors!!! :)

NWMike
09-06-2013, 01:03 AM
Don't forget to run the fuel stabilizer (Sta-bil) before you start the process to get it through the lines first. Carbureted engines (yours is injected) are a must as well to treat the fuel in the bowls. Treat the fuel in the tank in advance so that the treatment will distribute itself in the tank unless you can tow the boat around the block or plan on one more trip on the water.

bsloop
09-06-2013, 10:46 AM
I start running stabilizer Sept 1, fuel burn decreases and then all gas is good.
Fuel starts to age the moment it leaves the refinery. If you wait til winterization time, that fuel has had time to degrade. Many variables but most agree fuel has fallen off by a grade in 2-3 months. So the portion of fuel left in your tank from earlier fills has now degraded.

I try to change my oil end of season but don't get wrapped up that it is the last thing done before putting her to bed. Every time an engine is brought up to temp, any moisture is driven out and our boat motors get hot every time we use them, unlike grandma's engine that sludges up because she only takes 2 mile trips and never properly warms.

Fog through the intake is sufficient for most winter layups (or none at all if it is short time and kept dry). When I do fog, choking it down as the coolant is sucked in. Fogging the cylinders is good protocol for LONG periods but be prepared for fouled plugs in the spring. Personally, I would not cylinder fog unless layup was planned for a year or more.

Definitely pull plugs to drain water then antifreeze and pull plugs to check it ran completely thru system. I go ahead and drain antifreeze. The anti corrosion properties of any liquid left still protect the motor as it sits and there is no chance of a dilute antifreeze mixture freezing in extreme conditions.

Baszy
09-17-2013, 10:31 PM
Great info. thank you. I am about to winterize my 08' mcx with heater. Anybody have any different procedures for the antifreeze to the heater? My understanding is to warm engine with water,drain, run engine with antifreeze and turn on heater to draw antifreeze to the heater core. Right??

Timr245
10-09-2013, 10:19 PM
Just had the same question today. Called a MC dealer & they just told me to unhook the hoses at the engine & blow em out with air. Couldnt get the hose off the front of the engine so I just blew through the 1 that came off & got alot of water out off the knock sensor holes & impeller housing. Not sure if this is right but it's what they told me.

east tx skier
10-10-2013, 09:11 AM
Definitely drain the block and manifolds before adding antifreeze. No dillution problems and you will use less antifreeze.

CantRepeat
10-14-2013, 02:46 PM
Definitely drain the block and manifolds before adding antifreeze. No dillution problems and you will use less antifreeze.

My only issue with draining the block and manifolds is that if you take the hot water way from the thermostat long enough for it close you wont get anti freeze through out the motor.

I did a test this time, when I winterized.

I ran the motor to temp and let it run for 15 minutes at temp. Then drained the oil and changed the filter. The oil was very warm so I knew the motor was good and warm. After changing the oil I ran the motor back up to temp and let it run for 15 minutes once it reached temp. I then ran 6 gallons of anti freeze in through the water pick up. Once done I pulled the side plug to check for anti freeze and it was full of anti freeze and no water.

I think as long as you full heat the motor and do not let the thermostat cool down you are just fine not draining the block and if you do drain the block and wait add anti freeze the thermostat is more likely to close. Likewise, if done correctly I do not believe there is any reason to pull the thermostat.

bigmac
10-14-2013, 03:30 PM
Great info. thank you. I am about to winterize my 08' mcx with heater. Anybody have any different procedures for the antifreeze to the heater? My understanding is to warm engine with water,drain, run engine with antifreeze and turn on heater to draw antifreeze to the heater core. Right??

If you do that before draining all the water, the antifreeze you put in there will be diluted. It's an OK thing to do if you drain the block of your dilute antifreeze solution. The comment above about the thermostat not being open is also very true. If you're going to rely just on an engine full of antifreeze, you're probably better off pumping it in there rather than relying on the engine's natural circulation, which will be dependent on the thermostat.

If you're not certain of the procedure, I'd be inclined to recommend that you just pump antifreeze through the heater and just drain the block and manifolds as MasterCraft explains in the manual.

You could kill two birds with one stone by pumping antifreeze through your heater core from the heater supply line (splice into the 5/8 hose, or install a flushing T). In addition to filling the heater that should return antifreeze to the upper part of the engine too.

Not sure what you mean about turning on the heater. Unless you have the return valve closed, water is always circulating through the heater. "Turning it on" only turns on the fan.

I did the antifreeze through the engine thing for a couple of years, putting the raw water intake line into a five gallon bucket while running the engine. It was the hassle of doing that, as well as the rest of the stuff, that made me decide that paying the dealer to do it just worked a lot better for me. He "pickles" the boat too, in -100 propylene glycol throughout the engine and heater. I don't know his technique exactly, but it's worked well for me. Never had any issues the the last 5 or 6 years, and as a bonus, I rarely need to change the RW impeller. Come the spring, there are no hoses to reconnect...just drop the boat the water and start her up. Dealer's been doing this to literally a thousand boats a year for well over a decade and proven it to be an effective technique.

east tx skier
10-14-2013, 07:25 PM
Ah, I always forget about that. Nonissue on my PCM motor. You can pour af in cold. Bypass on the t-stat. Takes just about 3 gallons.