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Upnorth07
08-07-2013, 11:54 AM
I anticipate purchasing an 2007 - 2010 X15 in the future and it will be my first MasterCraft (and holy cow am I excited!). I've got a lot of time and training operating boats but when it comes to MC trailers, I need some guidance. My tow vehicle will not have a trailer brake controller but I am not new to trailering. Just need the MC trailer low-down.

With the actual purchase of the X15, my requirement is a factory trailer with dual axles and 4-wheel disc brakes. My questions are:

1. What type of braking system do the 2007 - 2010 dual axle X15 trailers come with?

2. So it has 4-wheel disc brakes...how do they work/activated? Do they come on when I press the brake pedal in the tow vehicle? Is it that simple?

3. That leads me to wonder what type of PIN connector the 2007 - 2010 dual axle trailers have? 4-pin or 7-pin? If it is a 7-pin connector and my vehicle is wired as a 4-pin, am I screwed or can I convert to 7-pin with 7-pin functionality? (My tow vehicle hasn't been wired yet so I may have options?)

I'm hoping to gain thorough knowledge and understanding of these trailers so when I prep my tow vehicle to pull, I'm ready to go. I anticipate my purchase will be out of state where I will drive my tow vehicle to the boat and if the deal is done, tow the boat home without any hiccups or issues.

Thanks

billr
08-07-2013, 01:16 PM
The trailer has a master cylinder built into the tongue of the trailer. The 7 pin wiring only uses 5 pins. You will need to convert the pigtail on your truck and add the reverse lights to activate the brake release solenoid valve.

Upnorth07
08-08-2013, 09:26 AM
Thanks, Bill.

What what kind of brakes does this trailer have? In my research on trailers in general, I have read about the following:

1. Electric
2. Electric over hydraulic
3. Surge

What kind are most desirable?

Erik

Ski-me
08-08-2013, 09:58 AM
Thanks, Bill.

What what kind of brakes does this trailer have? In my research on trailers in general, I have read about the following:

1. Electric
2. Electric over hydraulic
3. Surge

What kind are most desirable?

Erik

Most of the boat trailers will have surge, hydraulic brake systems. Some will have drum brakes and the newer ones, disc brakes. The ones you are mentioning are most likely disc brakes. The backup signal goes to a solinoid on the back of the hydraulic master cylinder that is in-line with your brake line. When activated, it releases the hydraulic pressure on the line (and brakes) so you can back up easily. Otherwise, the brake tend to lock up when backing up.

Many years ago my dad converted our hydraulic brakes to electric on our Cobalt. I think he was having problems with them but you also need to keep in mind, I was in Wyoming. And he probably just wanted it to be like the horse trailers. It worked and I don't recall any issues.....but again, I was only 16 years old. So, possible but not too common on electric type brakes for boats.

ricford
08-08-2013, 07:01 PM
If I'm not mistaken most, if not all, Mastercraft trailers come with surge brakes. They are the most simple to use by far, just hook up and go. I've used electric brakes on a house trailer and they were a pain to adjust. That was a long time ago, though. Newer systems may be better.

onewheat
08-08-2013, 07:46 PM
I haven't seen electric brakes on a boat trailer. I think the constant submerging would give you problems, like bulb-type lights have in the past. LED's and surge brakes are what would be on the factory trailer and that is what you want to have. They do work very well when maintained.

Upnorth07
08-09-2013, 10:34 AM
Ok, to rehash, it sounds like this trailer has surge type brakes and I'll need to tap/wire the reverse light on my tow vehicle to allow the solenoid to engage to allow me to back the trailer up.

So, how do surge brakes work? As I am slowing down the weight of the boat will try and push the tow vehicle and then the trailer will recognize this and activate the brakes? Is there a sensor on the trailer or in the coupler somewhere?

Ski-me
08-09-2013, 11:20 AM
As the weight of the boat moves forward on braking, it pushes against the actuator/hitch ball connection. That pushes the fluid to the brake cylinders and trailer brakes. The harder you push on your truck's brakes, the more force that pushes against that actuator and ultimately, more braking pressure.

If you are super gentle on your truck brakes as you slow down, the trailer brakes don't actuate very much. You have to brake a little more forceful to get the actuator to kick in real solid.

Hope that makes sense.

Upnorth07
08-09-2013, 03:44 PM
Great - thanks to all for there help here.

I'm confident I know how to wire my tow vehicle, how surge brakes work and the master cylinder/solenoid back up piece.

Erik