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View Full Version : How do you recover your skier/wakeboarder etc.


john jones
07-30-2013, 12:29 AM
This season I have been watching how people recover their skier's. How they turn, how fast they get back to the skier in the water, if they keep the skier on the starboard or port side.

Just curious, what does everyone do?

Jerseydave
07-30-2013, 03:50 AM
I stop the boat with a very slight turn to the right. Wait 4-5 seconds then turn the bow right back into the path I just came from. (some drivers use reverse to line back up, I never do and my transmission loves me for it!) By then my rollers are either gone or just barely hitting the side of the boat. Idle, idle, idle back to the rider/skier. Keep him on the drivers side unless we are wake surfing the port side.

FrankSchwab
07-30-2013, 04:25 AM
I follow JerseyDave's plan. Keeping the skier on the driver's side:
1. keeps them in view
2. allows you to move the platform towards them with a quick shot of reverse.

Unless there's someone coming up the lake, in which case I rotate the wheel fully right, hammer the throttle, and get between the skier and the oncoming boat ASAP. Sure, I throw a big wake and burn a half gallon of gas, but it's gotta be done.

/frank

bturner2
07-30-2013, 07:30 AM
As stated above. If we have the lake by ourselves we typically slow down in a straight line until the boat is moving slow enough as to not send rollers down the lake. Then turn and idle back to the skier. That is the normal procedure. If someone looks hurt or took a bad fall then screw the water, a quick turn and back quickly (but under control) back to the skier.

I'm much more protective of the skier on a busier lake. The driver and observers (we count everyone in the boat as observers and expect that everyone in the boat will be looking out for the skier) watch for potential issues. I will typically turn while still on plane and will get back to the skier as fast as the situation demands. As stated above I tend to get the boat between the skier and any other boats I see that may cause a threat to the skier.

We always try to retrieve the skier on the drives side of the boat. That way the driver has fewer blind spots and can determine a safe approach to the skier.

willyt
07-30-2013, 08:27 AM
dat gum dere skiiers be a fallin - i git back to dem as fast as dere nascar! POWERTURN WOOOHOOO

more fishin time wit dat rolllll cage n fishin pole holders!!

ttu
07-30-2013, 08:30 AM
dat gum dere skiiers be a fallin - i git back to dem as fast as dere nascar! POWERTURN WOOOHOOO

more fishin time wit dat rolllll cage n fishin pole holders!!

dang willy, that was you at the lake on sunday that I got so pissed at!:rolleyes::rolleyes:

snork
07-30-2013, 08:48 AM
Idle down, turn in direction of fall'n rider, that'll cover your rider even when you're head'n to retrieve him/her, you should never throttle the boat back to the fall'n rider, keep skier in view while idling back, ALWAYS keep skier, wakeboarder on starboard/driver side only exception is surfer and barefooter using boom on port side

mzimme
07-30-2013, 08:58 AM
I come off plane, let the rollers pass, turn and idle back. I always keep anyone down on my starboard side so I can see them.

Jeff_in_NY
07-30-2013, 09:06 AM
Same as a most of you... slow down, make the turn, go back straight. If they are going again, I slowly loop out wide so that the rope/handle will get back to them. I love it when they start struggling and swimming for the rope and I say "just sit there, I'm bringing the rope to you" and it ends up perfectly in their hands. No need to swim for it.

pap
07-30-2013, 09:29 AM
Off throttle, idle turn hard, over rollers and then 3-5mph back to rider. Gentle turn around them and ready to go again.

Friends don't let friends do power turns.

(saw a Mastercraft yesterday on Salt fork doing power turns to pick up downed riders... shame)

Astepatatime
07-30-2013, 09:44 AM
Pretty much the same as what's been mentioned - slow down, turn back, idle up on driver side.

I've been working on my rope technique for the wakeboard rope. I use basically two approaches, depending on which way I want to go. If I want to continue in the same direction i was heading before the rider fell, then it's a simple U turn and the rope comes back to the rider. If I want to change directions, I've been working on what I call an "S" turn - come up with rider on Starboard side, about 10-15 feet past, hard right to go past the rider, crossing past him, then hard left, which brings the rope back to him. When I do it right, the rope comes perfectly to him and I'm already aligned with the rider directly behind me, no extra maneuvering required.

For surfing, the trick I'm working on is getting the rider position just right on the port side without having to drag him/her around.

TxsRiverRat
07-30-2013, 09:47 AM
Great question...

This is straight from the USA Waterski Trained Driver Program manual:

http://s22.postimg.org/k9gvj7k5d/USAWS_Trained_Driver_Program.jpg

Tommy1005
07-30-2013, 09:49 AM
I try not too, but if it's a busy weekend and I feel my rider may be in an issue with a boat headed for them I will hammer the throttle and get the boat between my rider and any potential issue. I view it as my job to protect whoever is in the rider when I am at the helm. 90% of the time if the lake is that busy I'd rather be at a sand bar than out dealing with the idiots though, so this is a rare occasion when I have to do this.

If the rider is not threatened or hurt, I back off the throttle and idle back to the rider, loop around them so the rope gets to them without their having to swim for it and go again, and I always keep the rider on the driver side.

drschemel
07-30-2013, 10:26 AM
I always approach on starboard (driver's) side as well. The pattern depends on where the rope is tied (wake pole, ski pole, or stern). Closed bow means I don't have to wait for the wave to settle. I have stuck the bow into a wave deep enough that I would have swamped an open bow boat!

wheelerlake
07-30-2013, 10:42 AM
When I'm exhausted I let go, give the OK signal. My hubby throttles down, turns back to get me, keeping me on the driver's side as he grabs my ski from me. I make sure the pin is pulled so no prop action before I crawl up the platform. My great observer winds in the rope in big loops so it's ready to go again with no knots. Then we go pick up my orange painted drop off ski;) It's so habit I had to think about it to type it! It's weird when someone else observes for me as it knocks off our habits. I can't go when it's busy (new knees) so that's usually not an issue for us.

GoneBoatN
07-30-2013, 11:32 AM
In the Delta we are often in narrow channels. I've taught my son (and I do it myself) to always turn into the wind when there is a cross wind. This does a few things for you: 1) keeps you slower, 2) you can keep some power on for better steering, 3) keeps you away from the banks. Because of this we will occasionally approach on the port side but only if plenty of room to keep extra distance on that side. Otherwise the rider has to swim to the middle of the channel.

On the subject of power turns, I just so much love when people do them to pick up their rider. When I see a fallen rider ahead, I very purposely angle off to show that their rider in not in danger, and yet 9 out of 10 times (at least during the yahoo time of day) their driver will do a power turn. IMO, they put their rider in more danger from their own boat with that little stunt. Seems to me most people just want to show how they can be the Mario Andretti of boat driving.

maxpower220
07-30-2013, 12:11 PM
Pick up is really dependent on where I am at and how the fall impacted the person. On busy lakes/rivers, it is more important for me to get the person in the water protected. Also, I usually have a lot of new or beginner skiers/boarders. I want to ensure that they are OK when they fall. The habit of idle for an injured person can be bad.

My wife drives for me very well. I asked her what she would do if I were injured. She didn't have a great answer, so we practiced.

I have had drivers who were OK, but saw my driving to pick up skiers. Bring them down the driver's side and close with a touch of reverse. I had a driver try that with me and basically ran be over in the water. He was smart enough to kill the engine, but was way too hot for the situation.

onewheat
07-30-2013, 12:41 PM
Recover them? You'll see them again after they swim back to the dock. Who has time to stop for people that fall? :D

jakethebt
07-30-2013, 06:58 PM
We use the key hole method as described above. Speed is determined by the how busy the lake is, how experienced the rider is and how many people are in the bow. Often we have to get back quicker than we would like so it is a balance of speed to protect the rider and keeping the bow dry. The other week we took a huge roller over the bow and ended up taking everything out to get the carpet dry.

supreme112279
07-30-2013, 07:28 PM
Kill the throttle to just something over idle. turn to the left as my MC turns better that way and greet the rider to the driver side. pass him as I turn to the right slightly and ready to go unless their ready to quit.

mdskier
07-30-2013, 08:36 PM
I pick up fallen skiers as most have mentioned, letting the rollers go by and idling back with the skier on the drivers side.

I am wondering how people handle turning while pulling a skier. I typically do wide turns when I have to change direction, but have read on this forum recently that one should not do slow gradual turns. So if I am coming to an area where I need to turn 180, do I just do it and get right back to the track I was in only in the opposite direction? How do you handle turns while pulling a skier/boarder?

georgea0731
07-30-2013, 08:41 PM
I'm still working on it, but approach at idle then about 1 boat length away, turn left 90 degrees and go to neutral, this keeps the skier on the drivers ski like everyone suggest and swings the platform around so they can slide their ski on to it then climb up. If its done right, the boat stops right in front of them. While she's getting in, I get the rope ready for the next skier, and get her towel ready cause she always has to wipe off her face before seating down in the drivers ski. Of course on the slalom course watch the rope as you turn around and don't pull/pop off a buoy. I seen it done for no apparent reason, no one was hunt just over reaction.

AlbertaSurfer
07-30-2013, 09:15 PM
I pick up fallen skiers as most have mentioned, letting the rollers go by and idling back with the skier on the drivers side.

I am wondering how people handle turning while pulling a skier. I typically do wide turns when I have to change direction, but have read on this forum recently that one should not do slow gradual turns. So if I am coming to an area where I need to turn 180, do I just do it and get right back to the track I was in only in the opposite direction? How do you handle turns while pulling a skier/boarder?

Give your wakeboarders a double up. Slow down about 8-9mph, turn 45*, after about 50yds, turn around the opposite way you 45*d and head back down your original path and resume your speed. Your rider can then choose a set wave in the rollers and follow it in to where it meets the wake. (You'll likely get to practice your "picking up a downed rider" skills immediately here too ;) )

For a skier, if you're in a course, drop 'em. Leave yourself enough room to pull them back up and set up for the next pass. If you're free skiing, just do a keyhole. Kinda like the double up I described. Just head back down between your own wakes if it's clear. That way, your wakes are helping push junk away from your path.

19_Skier
07-30-2013, 09:59 PM
Same as has been described before. It's a lost cause on our lake, I have yet to see an outboard or IO that doesn't power turn, there's also an X2 on the lake that likes to do them. It's a small lake, so you can imagine what one power turn does to it. Thankfully none of them are up when we ski and my driver (wife) knows how to drive!

ChandlerR
07-31-2013, 07:27 AM
Same as has been described before. It's a lost cause on our lake, I have yet to see an outboard or IO that doesn't power turn, there's also an X2 on the lake that likes to do them. It's a small lake, so you can imagine what one power turn does to it. Thankfully none of them are up when we ski and my driver (wife) knows how to drive!
Lost cause on my lake as well. I always wonder where all these internet good drivers are cause all I see is wally turns. Even the wakeboard v-drive boats do it. I grew up around boats and skiing and learned early how do do it right. Most of the young wakeboard groups we see probably didn't learn the correct way when they were young, or didn't listen.

MI_Corey
07-31-2013, 10:24 AM
I also do as described above although I was taught wrong, I have learned online to do it correct. My dad is Mr. Powerturn and there is no telling him otherwise.