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bigmac
10-09-2005, 02:56 PM
How do the dealers run up these boat engines in the shop for getting the thing up to temp and for putting in antifreeze? Is there some kind of fitting or accessory for getting water from a hose into the raw water intake?

On my 230 V-drive, the hull intake isn't accessible for fake-a-lake on the trailer because the intake sits entirely under one of the trailer bunks. I contemplate the Perko Flush-Pro, but I worry that the decreased inside diameter plus the valve mechanism might decrease water flow, and I'd also worry about weeds or other debris getting hung up in that valve. It's a neat idea, but I'd rather have a controllable ball-valve that doesn't change the water flow than an automatic spring-loaded rubber valve.

Alternatively, the raw water intake hose attacment to the through-hull intake IS accessible from the back seat. I suppose I could remove the hose from the intake and plug in some kind of garden hose fitting, but I'm wondering if anyone has a better solution, or knows how the dealers do it.

east tx skier
10-09-2005, 04:25 PM
My dealer shoves a hose into the intake hose. Some remove the hose at the hull and drop it into a bucket of water with a hose feeding the bucket. Some have a tank with restraints to run the boats on. Just depends. I don't really care for fake a lake personally.

Leroy
10-09-2005, 05:25 PM
On my 230, I take mine loose at the intake. It's not too hard, just double check when putting back on, if that came off would be a big problem!

Kell
10-09-2005, 05:44 PM
I take mine off at the intake as well and run a short piece of garden hose (6') which is connected to a ball valve and then connects to the garden hose. That way I can control the flow of water from inside the boat while winterizing. Also, my raw water intake hose has two stainless hose clamps to connect to the thru-hull connection. Just did the winterization yesterday and boat is tucked away for the winter.

bigmac
10-09-2005, 06:17 PM
I take mine off at the intake as well and run a short piece of garden hose (6') which is connected to a ball valve and then connects to the garden hose. That way I can control the flow of water from inside the boat while winterizing. Also, my raw water intake hose has two stainless hose clamps to connect to the thru-hull connection. Just did the winterization yesterday and boat is tucked away for the winter.

Clever idea, with the valve. I made this thing from $11 worth of doodads from the hardware store - gonna give it a try. If I drop the garden hose in a bucket of RV antifreeze, think it will draw it in OK?

http://mccollister.info/fitting.jpg

jimmer2880
10-09-2005, 07:24 PM
Clever idea, with the valve. I made this thing from $11 worth of doodads from the hardware store - gonna give it a try. If I drop the garden hose in a bucket of RV antifreeze, think it will draw it in OK?

http://mccollister.info/fitting.jpg

That's essentially what I do (only, I just use a 3/4" cpvc coupler & tighten down the hose a bit.). Sucks the juice right out of a 5-gal bucket no problem!

Leroy
10-09-2005, 08:55 PM
If there are no air leaks it will draw, just watch that it doesn't collapse the garden hose and no water gets through.

Mine last fall sucked up 6 gallons in ~20 seconds through the hose disconnected from the intake, at idle!

I'm skipping antifreeze this year. I've become convinced a good drain is enough.

prostar205
10-10-2005, 01:20 PM
I, too, disconnect the raw water inlet hose at the Y-pipe for my heater. I then attach a 1.5" diameter clear hose using the SS hose clamps to the Y-pipe and run the other end of the clear tubing into a 5-gallon bucket. I then feed the 5-gallon bucket with water from a hose. I tried running it directly off the hose and the suction of my engine (L-18) collasped the clear hose.

Also, I have never put anti-freeze in the block. I feel a good block drainage is all that is needed.

AirJunky
10-10-2005, 01:40 PM
I take mine off at the intake as well and run a short piece of garden hose (6') which is connected to a ball valve and then connects to the garden hose. That way I can control the flow of water from inside the boat while winterizing. Also, my raw water intake hose has two stainless hose clamps to connect to the thru-hull connection. Just did the winterization yesterday and boat is tucked away for the winter.
Got your call on Sat. Kell. Hope you got things figured out. Sounds like your thermostat was stuck wide open.
We went out to ski on Sun. Only one other boat on the water & it was glass. I forgot to plug the memory card in this morning so I could check out the pics. Guess I'll do that later tonite.

lakes Rick
10-10-2005, 10:51 PM
I disconnect the cold water line to my hot water shower, unscrew the fitting for the line, thread on the hose connector I purchased at the hose and coupling shop, then hook up my water hose and start the boat.. My hot water fitting is about a foot away from the impeller..

This also has the additional benefit of backwashing through my tranny cooler and out the intake before I start the boat, cleaning out my tranny cooler and any accumulated gunk..

Some will say that this is not enough water to cool the boat properly, but it seems to have worked fine for 7 years with this boat..

I only replace my impeller every 3 years also... Seems to work fine for me......

Kell
10-11-2005, 02:04 AM
Got your call on Sat. Kell. Hope you got things figured out. Sounds like your thermostat was stuck wide open.
We went out to ski on Sun. Only one other boat on the water & it was glass. I forgot to plug the memory card in this morning so I could check out the pics. Guess I'll do that later tonite.
Thanks for the help AirJunky, sorry to wake you up at 9:30 am on a Saturday ;) Don't know if I had a problem with the T-Stat or not, so I thought what the heck, take it out and test the T-Stat in boiling water and see if it works. What I notice was that when I hooked up the hose and let it run for 15 minutes to run the Stabil through the system, the temp gage never went above 125-130, so I thought the T-Stat was stuck in the open position. Last time I had the boat out the temp gage would indicate 160 to 180 which I think is normal. So with tools in hand I removed the T-Stat dropped it into boiling water and sure enough it opened right up. Having never done this before, I was curious on how it actually worked. So thanks to this site I learned something new. What I didn't do was use a thermonitor to see what temp the T-Stat actually opened up at. Come spring I'll need to order new gaskets, and given how cheap the T-Stats are, I'll just put in a new T-Stat at that time. Other than that the winterization went well.

east tx skier
10-11-2005, 11:45 AM
Just another alternative. My water hose doesn't feel lke being removed from the hull fitting (I got tired of pulling).

I got a 5 gallon bucket, drilled a hole in it with a hole saw, attached a 1.25" pvc fitting in an "L" shape ot the bucket and put a rubber fitting on the pipe so I could hook it up to my transmission cooler with hose clamps. I then sealed everything up where the pipe meets the bucket. I drop a hose in this bucket, let it run until it's half full, and crank it with the hose still running. I like it because the impeller pulls the water as needed and, unlike fake a lake, (1) there's a much larger reservoir, and (2) it's topside so I can see that it's working and not wonder if the plunger has fallen over. It ran me about $12.

wesgardner
10-11-2005, 11:57 AM
I've winterized hundreds of boats from years in the "yards" - I will run antifreeze thru mine, I will never have a cracked block.

Wes

east tx skier
10-11-2005, 12:05 PM
Don't forget to knock on wood. :)

bigmac
10-11-2005, 12:26 PM
If there are no air leaks it will draw, just watch that it doesn't collapse the garden hose and no water gets through.

Mine last fall sucked up 6 gallons in ~20 seconds through the hose disconnected from the intake, at idle!

I'm skipping antifreeze this year. I've become convinced a good drain is enough.

I made a connecting hose for sucking the antifreeze from the bucket putting garden hose fittings on 8 feet of 3/4 inch non-collapsing, flexible PVC spa hose.

Surfer
10-21-2005, 04:32 PM
So, the thermostat should be removed before running antifreeze in? That's what I've done, just to verify.

AirJunky
10-21-2005, 05:09 PM
............On my 230 V-drive, the hull intake isn't accessible for fake-a-lake on the trailer because the intake sits entirely under one of the trailer bunks.

I've read this from you & a number of other guys in this group. It just dawned on me that means that everytime you start your boat, even if it's in the water, but still sitting on the bunks, your doing a dry start. And till the boat is floating up over the bunks, the engine is bone dry...... and running.

Now I do this periodically to winterize my boat. But the engine has just had a ton of water in it & I'm only dry starting it for a couple seconds to blow it all out. Seems like a dry start to drive off the trailer could be a bad thing. Have you been told to be absolutely sure that your boat is floating when you start?

east tx skier
10-21-2005, 05:23 PM
In that situation, I'd drop the trailer in a little farther to float it, even if only slightly, before turning it over.

As it stands, my boat's intake isn't on the bunk.

AirJunky
10-21-2005, 05:26 PM
In that situation, I'd drop the trailer in a little farther to float it, even if only slightly, before turning it over.

As it stands, my boat's intake isn't on the bunk.
I should hope not. I think mine sticks down far enough it would get ripped off the boat if it hit the bunk.
Just curious..... I've never heard of any dealers telling anyone to be damn sure the boat is floating before starting it.

Tom023
10-21-2005, 05:30 PM
I've read this from you & a number of other guys in this group. It just dawned on me that means that everytime you start your boat, even if it's in the water, but still sitting on the bunks, your doing a dry start. And till the boat is floating up over the bunks, the engine is bone dry...... and running.

Now I do this periodically to winterize my boat. But the engine has just had a ton of water in it & I'm only dry starting it for a couple seconds to blow it all out. Seems like a dry start to drive off the trailer could be a bad thing. Have you been told to be absolutely sure that your boat is floating when you start?

Even though it's under the bunk, the intake is partially exposed and will draw water. It's just you cannot fit a fake a lake on it because of the bunk. I've never had a problem in 5 years so I am sure it's getting water flow at start up.

OhioX14
10-21-2005, 05:32 PM
I have a couple of questions for all you guys that suck in the antifreeze after bringing the engine up to temperature to open the thermostat (which is supposedly what most dealers do):

1) How do you verify that the thermostat has opened?

2) Do you just immediately switch from feeding water to feeding antifreeze while the engine is still running and just keep feeding until you see antifreeze coming out the exhaust?

3) If yes to #2 how much antifreeze do you typically use and how do you know that there aren't a few small pockets of water left in the block?

4) If no to #2 and you shut down the engine to drain the block, what keeps the thermostat from closing by the time you finish draining negating the reason for running to open it in the first place?

5) What about a heater core if you have one?

6) What type of antifreeze? The cheeper pink -50 or the better blue -100?

Sorry for so many questions but the simplicity of sucking in the antifreeze is appealing to me. With my previous boat engine (GT-40) I would drain the block (2 plugs), water pump elbow (1 plug), and exhaust manifolds (2 plugs) and then disconnect the water hoses leading from the thermostat housing, hold them all up, and start pouring antifreeze. It would take a little time to make its way around the thermostat by-pass but would fill the block with a less than a couple of gallons. This left a little for each exhaust manifold for good measure and I was done. I'd love to be able simplify this procedure by doing what it sounds like you guys are doing but I'm a little nervous about little pockets of water and what to do about the heater core.

Geoff

east tx skier
10-21-2005, 05:41 PM
I should hope not. I think mine sticks down far enough it would get ripped off the boat if it hit the bunk.
Just curious..... I've never heard of any dealers telling anyone to be damn sure the boat is floating before starting it.

Mine protrudes a little bit, but not much. The prostars a few years later had grates as well, but they were nearly flat.

bigmac
10-21-2005, 08:16 PM
I have a couple of questions for all you guys that suck in the antifreeze after bringing the engine up to temperature to open the thermostat (which is supposedly what most dealers do):

1) How do you verify that the thermostat has opened?

2) Do you just immediately switch from feeding water to feeding antifreeze while the engine is still running and just keep feeding until you see antifreeze coming out the exhaust?

3) If yes to #2 how much antifreeze do you typically use and how do you know that there aren't a few small pockets of water left in the block?

4) If no to #2 and you shut down the engine to drain the block, what keeps the thermostat from closing by the time you finish draining negating the reason for running to open it in the first place?

5) What about a heater core if you have one?

6) What type of antifreeze? The cheeper pink -50 or the better blue -100?

Sorry for so many questions but the simplicity of sucking in the antifreeze is appealing to me. With my previous boat engine (GT-40) I would drain the block (2 plugs), water pump elbow (1 plug), and exhaust manifolds (2 plugs) and then disconnect the water hoses leading from the thermostat housing, hold them all up, and start pouring antifreeze. It would take a little time to make its way around the thermostat by-pass but would fill the block with a less than a couple of gallons. This left a little for each exhaust manifold for good measure and I was done. I'd love to be able simplify this procedure by doing what it sounds like you guys are doing but I'm a little nervous about little pockets of water and what to do about the heater core.

Geoff
I pulled the 1 1/4 intake hose from the through-hull fitting and attached a hose adapter I made with hardware store parts ($11).....

http://mccollister.info/fitting.jpg

I also made a 6 foot piece of 3/4 inch spa hose (non-collapsing) with 3/4 inch garden hose fitting, connected it to the garden hose, on one end and the home-made adapter on the otherstarted the hose then started the engine. Brought it up to temp then disconnected the garden hose and dumped it in a bucket of 4 gallons of RV antifreeze. It started coming out the exhaust, and I shut it down after 4 gallons. It took about 30 seconds.

I then took out the block plugs, disconnected the pump side of the heater hose and plugged in a hand pump. I then pumped a gallon of RV antifreeze into the heater core until it started coming out the block drains, then I blew on that heater hose until I heard air coming through the intake manifold.

Because it was the first time I've ever done this, I pulled the circulating pump hose and both raw water pump hoses - I was gratified to see antifreeze in them.

Only caveat, next time I'd drain the block before doing the antifreeze-sucking as I think there's enough water in the block that it can dilute the stuff if you only run 4 gallons through. I assumed the thermostat was open since my water temp gauge read 155.

Here in Minnesota, I used -100 RV antifreeze (as do all the dealers). In the years I've lived here, I've seen -60 at least once not far from here.

OhioX14
10-21-2005, 11:41 PM
I then took out the block plugs, disconnected the pump side of the heater hose and plugged in a hand pump. I then pumped a gallon of RV antifreeze into the heater core until it started coming out the block drains, then I blew on that heater hose until I heard air coming through the intake manifold.



bigmac:

Thanks very much for the information! One question. When you pulled the block plugs AFTER sucking all the antifreeze into it first didn't you end up draining it out?

bigmac
10-21-2005, 11:54 PM
bigmac:

Thanks very much for the information! One question. When you pulled the block plugs AFTER sucking all the antifreeze into it first didn't you end up draining it out?

Yes. My reason for doing it was to make sure there was antifreeze in the block - to sort of validate my procedure. There was some antifreeze there, but I think it was diluted by the water that was still in the block. It was a learning process, and in essence, all I have now is a completely drained engine/exhaust/water circulation (as MasterCraft recommends) with antifreeze in the low spots instead of water. Next time...

ski_king
10-22-2005, 06:31 PM
I just finished the first half of winterizing my boat. Tomorrow I will remove the battery, wipe it down and tuck it away.

I always pull the intake hose and suck water out of a 5 gallon bucket until the engine is nice and warm (15-20 minutes). I usually have to shut it down a few times as it sucks water faster at idle than the hose will fill the bucket. Also I usually run it above idle to heat up faster. This is why I dont put the garden hose straight into the intake hose, it will be starved for water. Once the engine is warmed up and the thermostat is open, I switch to the bucket of 3 gallons of full strength automotive antifreeze. Once the engine has cooled down, I crack the plugs on each side of the block to verify there is antifreeze in there .

Surfer
10-24-2005, 11:29 AM
Hi,

I am just wondering why not just remove the thermostat, and then run antifreeze to the engine?
Without the thermostat cooling should work for the block and exhaust manifold equally.
Please do not tell me that, it is for some good reason, as I did winterize my boat, and the boat is about 150 miles away now.
I did remove thermostat and did run about 6 gallons of antifreeze in. Measured from exhaust it was pure antifreeze coming out about half a gallon, and then I did stop.
If the antifreeze "temperature tolerance" in the block would be less than the temperature outside, it does not brake the engine, just gets a bit jam-like, but does not freeze (= expand in volume), correct me if I am wrong.

Question: in which part /where in the engine does the cooling water exit block to the exhaust manifold?

Still I have to spray fogging spray or similar to the cylinders some weekend (and rotate the engine, with putting antifreeze at the same time in).

Also, shouldn't the antifreeze intake be before the lines to the transmission cooling, that needs the antifreeze as well, I suppose. Well, that's what I have done. Now third year.

Next year I will fix a line, so I can use the bucket method.

Hopefully you can read my "finnish accent" english!
:D

Workin' 4 Toys
10-24-2005, 05:11 PM
I just finished the first half of winterizing my boat. Tomorrow I will remove the battery, wipe it down and tuck it away.

I always pull the intake hose and suck water out of a 5 gallon bucket until the engine is nice and warm (15-20 minutes). I usually have to shut it down a few times as it sucks water faster at idle than the hose will fill the bucket. Also I usually run it above idle to heat up faster. This is why I dont put the garden hose straight into the intake hose, it will be starved for water. Once the engine is warmed up and the thermostat is open, I switch to the bucket of 3 gallons of full strength automotive antifreeze. Once the engine has cooled down, I crack the plugs on each side of the block to verify there is antifreeze in there .
Two things. You should not be using antifreeze at full strength, without water it will freeze. 2nd, why are you using automotive antifreeze? Are you recycling it when the season starts, or are you pumping it into the lake?

bigmac
10-24-2005, 05:22 PM
Hi,

I am just wondering why not just remove the thermostat, and then run antifreeze to the engine?
Without the thermostat cooling should work for the block and exhaust manifold equally.
Please do not tell me that, it is for some good reason, as I did winterize my boat, and the boat is about 150 miles away now.
I did remove thermostat and did run about 6 gallons of antifreeze in. Measured from exhaust it was pure antifreeze coming out about half a gallon, and then I did stop.
If the antifreeze "temperature tolerance" in the block would be less than the temperature outside, it does not brake the engine, just gets a bit jam-like, but does not freeze (= expand in volume), correct me if I am wrong.

Question: in which part /where in the engine does the cooling water exit block to the exhaust manifold?

Still I have to spray fogging spray or similar to the cylinders some weekend (and rotate the engine, with putting antifreeze at the same time in).

Also, shouldn't the antifreeze intake be before the lines to the transmission cooling, that needs the antifreeze as well, I suppose. Well, that's what I have done. Now third year.

Next year I will fix a line, so I can use the bucket method.

Hopefully you can read my "finnish accent" english!
:D


Removing the thermostat would eliminate the question of whether or not the thermostat opened during run up. As I said, I drained my block mainly to see if there was any antifreeze in there. I was distressed at how much less blue the block water was than the stuff in the circulating hoses. Besides, draining the block was easy - one brass bolt and one knock sensor

In my boat, the transmission cooler is a heat exchanger. Water from the raw water pump goes through it, while oil lines from the transmission circulate transmission oil around inside of it. Draining the big hose at the bottom of the transmission cooler will get it all out of there - there is no water circulating through the transmission.

Surfer
10-25-2005, 06:44 AM
As I understood, water cools the transmission. I have not drained transmission earlier, and it's been fine. I guess using 6 gallons of antifreeze will replace the possible water in there. The winterizing manuals do not tell or show to drain the transmission cooler. I guess only way would be to just take the lines out for draining.

bigmac
10-25-2005, 10:10 AM
As I understood, water cools the transmission. I have not drained transmission earlier, and it's been fine. I guess using 6 gallons of antifreeze will replace the possible water in there. The winterizing manuals do not tell or show to drain the transmission cooler. I guess only way would be to just take the lines out for draining.

Heat exchanger, not water-cooled transmission. The transmission oil cooler is a straight tube with water going through the middle, with oil circulation in tubing around the outside of the barrel. If you take those lines out, you'll find transmission oil all in them, not water.

All that's needed to drain the transmission cooler is disconnect the same hose you disconnect to check the filter screen for weeds. All that water that pours out is water that was in the tranny cooler and upper thermostat hose.

ski_king
10-25-2005, 11:14 AM
Two things. You should not be using antifreeze at full strength, without water it will freeze. 2nd, why are you using automotive antifreeze? Are you recycling it when the season starts, or are you pumping it into the lake?

Yes, I understand that full strength antifreeze does have a high freezing point than a 50/50 mix. I used the 50/50 mix for years, but switched to full strength some time ago after a friend had a problem. He used the 50/50 mix and suspected that there was a pocket of water left behind. The theory with the full strength is that if there are any pockets left behind will hopefully get diluted to 50/50.

By looking at the chart you will see that the 50/50 mixture the freeze point is –26 F. Going to 40/60 raises the freezing point to -4F.*** This chart doesn’t show the full strength freezing point, but if I remember correctly is somewhere around –20F.

Antifreeze/Water Freeze Point(Ice Crystals Form)
40% 60% -4°F
50% 50% -26°F
60% 40% -54°F
66% 34% -76°F

As far as using RV antifreeze, I have never been convinced that it contains rust prohibitives.***


When I winterize and summerize the boat I always have an old kiddie swimming pool I set behind the boat to catch the antifreeze. I put it back in th containers and usually give it away to a neighbor that has on old beater that is always leaking coolant.

I have used the “Pet Safe” propylene glycol, but this year I went with the ethylene glycol as the best price I cold find on the propylene glycol was over $8 a gallon.


***Doing a quick google of RV antifreeze I just learned something that may change the way I winterize next year. RV antifreeze is made from Propylene glycol.

Ice crystals will start to form in -50 RV Antifreeze at temperatures around +10° F and will appear to be solid ice at around -10° F to -15° F. Propylene glycol based antifreezes continue to contract and will not expand until temperatures of -50° F are reached, thus providing burst protection.

http://www.camco.net/faqwinterization.cfm

Workin' 4 Toys
10-25-2005, 12:16 PM
Well, its good thing you got it done, since its snowing there. Bring it here!!!!

Tom023
11-18-2005, 07:53 PM
Well, better late than never but I finally got all the parts necessary to replace my Flush Pro, which started leaking. I am going to install this tomorrow, but unlike all other boats, the X30/230 has a recessed intake that is directly under one of the bunks, so I will have to use the dealer's lift to gain access. The three way valve will allow full water flow with no restrictions, and I can easily switch to a garden hose set up. I cut the through hull at just the right length so that when everyting is tightened down, the valve will be right on top of the backing nut.

bigmac
11-19-2005, 03:03 AM
Well, better late than never but I finally got all the parts necessary to replace my Flush Pro, which started leaking. I am going to install this tomorrow, but unlike all other boats, the X30/230 has a recessed intake that is directly under one of the bunks, so I will have to use the dealer's lift to gain access. The three way valve will allow full water flow with no restrictions, and I can easily switch to a garden hose set up. I cut the through hull at just the right length so that when everyting is tightened down, the valve will be right on top of the backing nut.

Ah...I see what you did. Rather than putting the valve with two 1 1/4 inch barbs inline with the raw water hose like the Flush Pro, you're going to replace the intake strainer and attach the valve to that. That's VERY clever and very elegant.

Tom023
11-19-2005, 07:37 AM
Thanks Bigmac. The existing thru-hull is plastic, which I didn't care for, so I wanted to replace that as well, and this way, the valve has a solid mount. Like every project, it turns out to be more than initially anticipated but I like the clean installation.

kent
11-19-2005, 09:48 AM
Bigmac I have done it couple of ways .1 just disconnect hose from water intake & adapt to hose fitting and you're good to go. 2 cut intake hose install an inline valve (ballvalve) same size as intake line toward intake side of hose than install "T"to eng. side of hose next adapt open port to accept garden hose.This is the best way. when boat is to be in lake make sure valve is wide open & closed when running off hose.
Good luck Kent

Tom023
11-19-2005, 10:07 AM
Kent, how do you close off the open port that accepts the garden hose when the boat is in the water?

bigmac
11-19-2005, 10:15 AM
Bigmac I have done it couple of ways .1 just disconnect hose from water intake & adapt to hose fitting and you're good to go.


That's my current method.

http://mccollister.info/fitting.jpg

It works fine, but mainly because my dealer has had his way with the intake hose's attachment to the through-hull strainer and it comes off pretty easily now. That might be a bad thing too, I suppose, but I cranked both of those hose clamps down pretty tight when I reassembled. I'm comforted by the fact that it's a suction hose, not pressurized.

Ric
11-19-2005, 03:48 PM
Well, better late than never but I finally got all the parts necessary to replace my Flush Pro, which started leaking. I am going to install this tomorrow, but unlike all other boats, the X30/230 has a recessed intake that is directly under one of the bunks, so I will have to use the dealer's lift to gain access. The three way valve will allow full water flow with no restrictions, and I can easily switch to a garden hose set up. I cut the through hull at just the right length so that when everyting is tightened down, the valve will be right on top of the backing nut.
looks solid
I may do this too!
Pics of the install too please!!

JDK
11-20-2005, 01:15 AM
The three way valve will allow full water flow with no restrictions, and I can easily switch to a garden hose set up

Be very carefull with that. When you put your boat in the water for the first time in the spring, I'd remove the yellow handle and store it in the glove box .......lots of boats end up sitting on the bottom because of improper or accidental movement of a 'seacock' (which is what you are using that 3 way ball valve as).
- if the handle accidentaly gets shifted, and you don't have the 3rd. port plugged, your boat will definitely fill with water.
- if the handle gets shifted and you do have the 3rd. port plugged, your boat won't fill with water, but it will starve for water when you start the engine.
- if you're winterizing your boat in fall of 2009 and you forget to return the handle to the normal running position when your done, one of the above could happen in the spring of 2010.

Tom023
11-20-2005, 08:41 AM
Thanks for the warning, that's why I'll lock the handle in the raw water positon. Some valves have a lock out, this one did not but it does have a hole in the handle that will work nicely for a good zip tie.

bigmac
11-20-2005, 11:49 AM
Be very carefull with that. When you put your boat in the water for the first time in the spring, I'd remove the yellow handle and store it in the glove box .......lots of boats end up sitting on the bottom because of improper or accidental movement of a 'seacock' (which is what you are using that 3 way ball valve as).
- if the handle accidentaly gets shifted, and you don't have the 3rd. port plugged, your boat will definitely fill with water.
- if the handle gets shifted and you do have the 3rd. port plugged, your boat won't fill with water, but it will starve for water when you start the engine.
- if you're winterizing your boat in fall of 2009 and you forget to return the handle to the normal running position when your done, one of the above could happen in the spring of 2010.

It's a good point, certainly a plug on the 3/4 inch fitting is more than prudent and should be easy to fabricate from the hardware store. Alternatively, a short length of garden hose permanently attached would keep the boat from taking on any water from an open seacock if the open end of the hose were suspended in the bilge/motor box anywhere above the outside water level.

As to the handle, I think I'd prefer leaving it on so that a quick glance would confirm for me that it is indeed in the correct position.

I wonder if the 90-degree angle the intake stream now has to make will have any negative effect on intake flow.....

Tom023
11-20-2005, 01:21 PM
I thought about the garden hose too but for different reasons. First, it would make it a bit easier to attach the hose from the house instead of having to reach down into the bilge. Second, if I ever did spring a big leak, I could switch the valve, stick the hose down into the bilge and let the engine pump the water out.

Tom023
11-20-2005, 05:01 PM
looks solid
I may do this too!
Pics of the install too please!!
Ric,

Finished the install today so attached are a couple of pictures. I also, almost finished my battery relocation project, so attached a couple of those as well. If you go this route with the valve, I learned a couple of things along the way I can share.

TX.X-30 fan
07-19-2007, 07:09 PM
Ric,

Finished the install today so attached are a couple of pictures. I also, almost finished my battery relocation project, so attached a couple of those as well. If you go this route with the valve, I learned a couple of things along the way I can share.



I guess all the pics of this are gone? Why does MC not install some kind of shut off at the water inlet. Say you shred an impeller in the middle of the lake and want to install a spare. Take the impeller cover off and the water will flow non stop. Same as if the hose gets a hole, there is no way to stop the lake from coming on in. There is a valve on the ballast intake, I would rather have it on the raw water intake, at least the ballast tanks offer some containment.


Anyway if someone remembers what it takes to convert this I am interested. I have the same problem with the bunk covering my intake grate, but I think I could just jack the boat off far enough to install this. As long as Ric gives the thumbs-up on bunk/intake clearance. :D

OhioX14
07-19-2007, 07:23 PM
I guess all the pics of this are gone? Why does MC not install some kind of shut off at the water inlet. Say you shred an impeller in the middle of the lake and want to install a spare. Take the impeller cover off and the water will flow non stop. Same as if the hose gets a hole, there is no way to stop the lake from coming on in. There is a valve on the ballast intake, I would rather have it on the raw water intake, at least the ballast tanks offer some containment.

:D

They apparently do now. I just took delivery of an '08 X14 and not only does it have the shut off valves on the ballast, it does on the raw water intake as well. My '06 did not have this, not sure about '07.

TX.X-30 fan
07-19-2007, 07:38 PM
They apparently do now. I just took delivery of an '08 X14 and not only does it have the shut off valves on the ballast, it does on the raw water intake as well. My '06 did not have this, not sure about '07.



Congratulations on the new boat, any pics yet. Thanks for the info, guess I need to find out whats on there and go that way. If you see a brand on the handle I would like to know. Thanks

bigmac
07-19-2007, 07:52 PM
I guess all the pics of this are gone? Why does MC not install some kind of shut off at the water inlet. Say you shred an impeller in the middle of the lake and want to install a spare. Take the impeller cover off and the water will flow non stop. Same as if the hose gets a hole, there is no way to stop the lake from coming on in. There is a valve on the ballast intake, I would rather have it on the raw water intake, at least the ballast tanks offer some containment.


Anyway if someone remembers what it takes to convert this I am interested. I have the same problem with the bunk covering my intake grate, but I think I could just jack the boat off far enough to install this. As long as Ric gives the thumbs-up on bunk/intake clearance. :D
Here are the pics

http://mccollister.info/valvecock.jpg
http://mccollister.info/valvecock2.jpg

TX.X-30 fan
07-19-2007, 08:16 PM
Here are the pics

http://mccollister.info/valvecock.jpg
http://mccollister.info/valvecock2.jpg




As they say everytime Woods hits a shot (u tha man). Thanks bigmac, any idea what he used for the strainer under the boat. That looks like a straight forward install, I just don't want to sink a boat.

bigmac
07-20-2007, 12:11 AM
As they say everytime Woods hits a shot (u tha man). Thanks bigmac, any idea what he used for the strainer under the boat. That looks like a straight forward install, I just don't want to sink a boat.IIRC, he used the through-hull, not the grate. These are from the Perko catalogue.

http://mccollister.info/intake.jpg