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JDC
07-03-2013, 08:59 PM
Who has any tips they can share as far as drilling holes in my boat for pull up cleats?
It appears I need to drill 3/4" holes.

Should I use a hole saw bit? Are there any precautions I need to take to keep from chipping or flaking, or is that even a problem drilling in gelcoat?

Thanks in advance,

Aric'sX15
07-03-2013, 09:08 PM
id use a step drill bit, and mask off with painters tape to help from cracking.

Cloaked
07-03-2013, 09:08 PM
Who has any tips they can share as far as drilling holes in my boat for pull up cleats?
It appears I need to drill 3/4" holes.

Should I use a hole saw bit? Are there any precautions I need to take to keep from chipping or flaking, or is that even a problem drilling in gelcoat?

Thanks in advance,Search on the forum. Several threads on this topic.

.

FrankSchwab
07-03-2013, 09:16 PM
Gelcoat is very brittle when drilling, if you don't do it right the edges of the hole will chip while you're drilling, and start spider cracks that will propagate a long way over time.

I was very successful with a step drill (http://www.harborfreight.com/2-piece-titanium-nitride-coated-high-speed-steel-step-drill-bits-69088.html), as Aric suggests. Use a small drill, run it in reverse until you get through the gelcoat, then forward through the fiberglass. Then use the step drill up to the diameter you need.

Aric'sX15
07-03-2013, 09:23 PM
Search on the forum. Several threads on this topic.

.

Is it me or are you the forum nazi? good lord. I'm pretty tired of seeing your useless posts around here

Cloaked
07-03-2013, 09:28 PM
Is it me or are you the forum nazi? good lord. I'm pretty tired of seeing your useless posts around hereToo bad.... just put my screen name on your ignore list.

Box of Kleenex for you too. Equal opportunity...


.

Aric'sX15
07-03-2013, 09:41 PM
its really irritating, Im clearly not the only one who thinks so

JRW160
07-03-2013, 10:14 PM
There should be backing plates glassed in. Drill in reverse through the gelcoat. Make sure you chamfer the edges of the gelcoat to prevent spider cracks. Use some blue loctite on the nuts to keep them from coming loose.

46Chief
07-03-2013, 11:33 PM
Where you getting the cleats from?

KahunaCraft
07-03-2013, 11:40 PM
Wonder if duct tape would be better or worst in this application ?

In terms of running cutting bits in reverse, I did the same when I cut plastic siding with a skill saw, prevented the plastic from splintering likely a similar effect with fibreglass/gel coat. I'd buy a high grade bit and take a look at the RPM's of the drill. Slower seems to be better and yes in reverse.

Some other thoughts ..

1. Drill a small pin test hole first 1/8th inch in the area you want to place the cleat, that way if you decide to move the hole 1/2 inch either side you'll be fine. In case where you're off a bit.

2. Take a look at the stock ones, MC had someone do some research on where they go, may not be obvious at first glance. Also helps with resale if you mimic original as much as possible. I'd try to find a relatively flat spot if possible.

3. There are wiring harnesses close by, take your time. Measure three times, drill once.

4. If you're sold on having them, I'm assuming your adding the midship cleats, don't read this point. There are fender adjusters that I use even though I have midship cleats. They work well if the cleat is mainly being used for bumpers. Just a thought.

gotjag941
07-04-2013, 02:26 AM
its really irritating, Im clearly not the only one who thinks so

Completely onboard with you

JRW160
07-04-2013, 03:53 AM
Completely onboard with you
You know what is useful; actually posting links to previous posts. If the OP had found them himself, he probably wouldn't have started a new post. The search on this site is terrible. Google: sites:mastercraft.com pull up cleats (https://www.google.com/search?q=sites%3Amastercraft.com+pull+up+cleats&oq=sites%3Amastercraft.com+pull+up+cleats&aqs=chrome.0.57j58.6383j0&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8)

JDC
07-04-2013, 11:11 AM
Search on the forum. Several threads on this topic.

.I DID a search but to be honest, I was looking for the key answer in the thread titles and quit reading too soon. I did find this one (http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=31933&highlight=Drilling+gelcoat) done by rudaire after I started the thread and it has a lot of information in it.
Thanks for the help.

Gelcoat is very brittle when drilling, if you don't do it right the edges of the hole will chip while you're drilling, and start spider cracks that will propagate a long way over time.

I was very successful with a step drill (http://www.harborfreight.com/2-piece-titanium-nitride-coated-high-speed-steel-step-drill-bits-69088.html), as Aric suggests. Use a small drill, run it in reverse until you get through the gelcoat, then forward through the fiberglass. Then use the step drill up to the diameter you need.That's what I was afraid of. Thanks. I have a step drill but I always view it as a cheap alternative. :o You and Aric may have me seeing it in a different light. :)

There should be backing plates glassed in. Drill in reverse through the gelcoat. Make sure you chamfer the edges of the gelcoat to prevent spider cracks. Use some blue loctite on the nuts to keep them from coming loose.Good point on the backing plates. I didn't think of that either. Since I was going to add these as mid-ship cleats for tie up, I should use a plate or maybe fender washers if the OD is not too big.

Where you getting the cleats from?ebay. There was a post on here about the listing where the guy doesn't respond to offers (when he has "Make an Offer" available). Here (http://www.ebay.com/itm/370786696427?ssPageName=STRK:MEWAX:IT&_trksid=p3984.m1438.l2649#ht_829wt_673) is the link if I copied it right.

Thanks for all the suggestions! I guess a wood boring bit is also good to use as the thread in the link above shows one being used with good results... starting with the drill going backwards too.

As JRW160 suggested, chamfering the edges seems to be a very important step for long term success in preventing cracks.
Also, I fully agree with him on posting links to previous posts if someone is looking for a solution. It's sort of like teaching a man to fish, and feeding a man for a day at the same time. ;)

JDC
07-04-2013, 11:39 AM
We've had 2 problems tying up our boat at times.
One problem is the freeboard on our boat is so low, we have to have the fenders adjusted right up to the cleat or else the rub rail takes a beating. Where other boats can have the fender line out a bit to let the fender protect the side, at many docks our side is under the dock edge so we need to protect the rub rail.

With that, the fender line shares the cleat with the dock line. It gets to be a pain with both lines on the cleat. I've seen boats with fender hangers but they wont work that well with ours. With the low freeboard, the short line on the fender would pull vertically on the hangers mounting screws.

At midship, we've been tying the fender line to the tower and that works. I just need to add a clip so I can clip the fender on rather than tying each time. Also that will allow us to unclip and go. Cant have fenders deployed when underway. :rolleyes:

The other problem is dock cleat spacing at some docks. If we had a mid-ship cleat, that would solve a lot of tie up problems.

So... I was thing of adding two pull up cleats at midship and two at the rear. The two at the rear would go just in front of the two that are there. Sure that would alter the original MC design, but I need to have more fun and less frustration. :D

If anyone has a solution for hanging fenders in the rear on a PS209, I'm all ears (or eyes in the case of reading a forum).

Thanks,

JRW160
07-04-2013, 12:06 PM
When tying up with other boats, I always use hippity hops. I keep a 12v pump on the boat and inflate them when needed. They are about 15" in diameter and keep the boats apart really well. I have some 6" taylor made fenders, but they aren't enough. Some larger fenders would work, but I just don't have the storage space for them. When tying up, I hang a hippity hop off the rear cleat and one midship off the tower or cleat. I tie a rope to the transom eye and another off the bow eye.

CantRepeat
07-05-2013, 01:05 PM
For a 3/4 hole I use a hole saw and tape off the gel. First, after you layout the point you want it drill a very small pilot hole and check for clearance on the under side of the deck before you make your large hole. By using a small pilot hole it gives you the chance to move the location around a bit. So long as the pilot hole is within the size of the hole saw.

JDC
07-06-2013, 12:24 AM
When tying up with other boats, I always use hippity hops. I keep a 12v pump on the boat and inflate them when needed. They are about 15" in diameter and keep the boats apart really well. I have some 6" taylor made fenders, but they aren't enough. Some larger fenders would work, but I just don't have the storage space for them. When tying up, I hang a hippity hop off the rear cleat and one midship off the tower or cleat. I tie a rope to the transom eye and another off the bow eye.I've heard those work well when tying up to other boats. Your X2 has a lot higher sides than mine.

Our problem is mainly when tying up to a dock, but the problem is how short we have to have the fender line to the cleat. It's like 2" max. 3" or more and the fender hangs too low and leaves the rub rail out there to get trashed on the dock.

JRW160
07-06-2013, 02:41 AM
The sides on my x2 are pretty low. Those hippity hops are big. Exile makes some 18" ones. My rubrail sits a lot lower than some of the boats we tie up with and we never have a problem. A lot of times I will tie the rope on the cleat through the handle on the hippity hop.

JDC
07-06-2013, 09:43 AM
I just may have to give 'em a try.