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PendO
10-08-2005, 12:18 AM
So, pulling wire tomorrow for a remodel on our cabin ... using 12/2 on the 20A Circuit Breakers and 14/2 on the 15A ... recognize that per NEC I can put a 15A receptacle on a 20A circuit, provided there is more than one receptacle on the circuit .. and I will not be mixing 12/2 and 14/2 on the same circuit (branch)

From what I can tell I should use the AFCI circuit breakers for wiring that is in bedrooms, and the GFCI for potential wet areas ... however, I see that there are some combination AFCI/GFCI circuit breakers ... anyone use these? Good/Bad? I was thinking about using the combination type for the bedrooms/bathrooms and AFCI on all the others in the cabin ... I know it is overkill - so putting cost aside, is there a downside?

I'm just keeping it simple with Single Pole switches ... any need to pull 12/3 or 14/3 ... (aside from for the Range/Washer/Dryer 220V appliances?)

Lastly, anyone have any personal recomendations on the instant/tankless hot water systems (electric).

http://www.gotankless.com/products.html


TIA - Casey

Dan K
10-08-2005, 01:00 PM
For GFI protection I use a GFI receptacle as the fisrt device on a circuit and use the load side for the rest of the circuit, it is all protected this way and a lower cost than buying GFCI breakers, Also more convenient to reset if it is tripped usually.

milkmania
10-08-2005, 01:43 PM
I don't know much about GFCI or wiring.....

but I do know that a 30amp double-pole GFCI breaker is $100.00!!!!!!!:mad::rant:


for a GE box

Upper Michigan Prostar190
10-09-2005, 09:29 AM
reading this electrical stuff makes me think about that movie MR. MOM with micheal keaton. That scene where he is using a power saw to impress his wives boss and martin mull asks him if he going to wire it all 220. and keaton replies "220, 230, whatever it takes." :purplaugh :uglyhamme gotta love when people talk out of their $(# :popcorn:

Kevin 89MC
10-10-2005, 11:51 AM
Pendo, I realize this is late, hopefully you're done by now. :toast: I'll throw in my $0.01, not sure it's worth $0.02!
I'm not an electrician, but I've done a fair amount of remodeling. I've had to replace several old GFCI outlets over the years, and never heard of a GFCI breaker going bad. I just installed my first AFCI breaker last year, no problems so far. From what I've read, I think they both definitely offer a notable margin of safety. Haven't heard of the combo breaker, but if it's reliable, I see no downsides, only the added safety.
I'm also very curious about the functionality of the tankless hot water heaters, both gas & electric. I really like the application in a cabin - much easier to winterize, and probably safer. Also you're usually not running too much at once at a cabin, so the GPM's should be OK. Possibly the best feature is the savings on the utility bills!
Good luck,
Kevin

X-45
10-10-2005, 11:58 AM
Use 12 Gauge wire through out. :twocents:

Leroy
10-10-2005, 12:31 PM
Pend; You seem up on the code, but I would spend some time with a local certified electricial just to be safe. Don't you need some buy off at the end from local building inspector?

djhuff
10-10-2005, 01:29 PM
If you can help it, only run the outlets on the AFCI circuit. Use a seperate 15A for the lights. Those AFCIs will trip at the drop of a hat (turn the TV on first, before the lights).

jamisonsbrodie
10-10-2005, 01:41 PM
Pend; You seem up on the code, but I would spend some time with a local certified electricial just to be safe. Don't you need some buy off at the end from local building inspector?
You only need an inspectors OK if you have requested a permit for the work, for which most do-it-your-selfers don't(in my experience).

Dan K
10-10-2005, 01:49 PM
I wouldn't mind the permit process except that they are wired into the assessors office and that's where it always costs a bunch to do any improvements.

jamisonsbrodie
10-10-2005, 02:01 PM
I wouldn't mind the permit process except that they are wired into the assessors office and that's where it always costs a bunch to do any improvements.
EXACTLY! When I initially inquired about permits, the local authorities quoted me $50/ fixture or a percentage of the total job. Also once the inspector is your house, he/she may notice other improvements that have been made. I just do everything to code and roll the dice. "Ask me no questions I'll tell you no lies".

LakePirate
10-10-2005, 02:40 PM
Use 12 Gauge wire through out. :twocents:

What he said....makes life much easier.

PendO
10-10-2005, 07:31 PM
Thanks all for your help/insight on this topic ... over the past year and a half I have enjoyed learning how to do some (do it yourself) electrical ... the more you do, the more you respect electricity ... my house is 1.5 years old, and I have not been thrilled with all of the electrical work, which was the catalyst for learning (wiring hot tub that never gets used). I have had a few of the "stab" connections fail at home, and my wife "needed" a few more lights in the unfinished portion of the basement.

I have two AFCI breakers on my house that have not tripped ... yet. Interesting where you see the contractor skim when you look at your pannel, as ultimately it is their responsibility, not the electrical contractor.

As for the cabin ... one thing I had forgotten about was pulling 12/3 to connect the smoke alarms, I was reminded about that on the Bu' site as I had posted the same thread.

We are going with the tankless water heater more for space savings than anything else, plus it is easier to winterize the place. I have not yet decided where to mount the water heater, but it will save a lot of space in the corner of the kitchen.

One thing I have not decided is whether or not to use the standard copper for water or to use the "PEX" material. Anyone use a system like this in a cabin or house?

http://www.ppfahome.org/pex/faqpex.html

http://www.vanguardpipe.com/mbloc.html

Kevin 89MC
10-11-2005, 11:32 AM
I would use PEX for sure. I have not personally used it yet, but a few friends have in cabins and houses. It is so much easier than copper. I've re-piped a number of houses in copper, and from what I can tell, PEX would be twice as fast, or more. If I ever re-do another one, I'll definitely try it. The "manifold" concept is great, too - fewer fittings, less confusion in what goes where.
Good luck,
Kevin