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Tristarboarder
06-17-2013, 12:40 PM
What are the wheel torque values when using a torque wrench to tighten the lugs on a trailer wheel? 1990 MC single axle trailer......

The reason I ask is because I have had problems both with the lugs either being too loose, and then once I broke a stud, and was told because I had the lug on too tight...Thanks

thatsmrmastercraft
06-17-2013, 12:51 PM
What are the wheel torque values when using a torque wrench to tighten the lugs on a trailer wheel? 1990 MC single axle trailer......

The reason I ask is because I have had problems both with the lugs either being too loose, and then once I broke a stud, and was told because I had the lug on too tight...Thanks

Too many people over-torque wheels. I pulled this chart from Tire Rack and their numbers are correct. I can't emphasize enough the importance of using a torque wrench if you want to avoid problems of broken studs and wheels falling off. They don't have to cost a lot. http://www.harborfreight.com/1-2-half-inch-drive-click-type-torque-wrench-239.html

Tristarboarder
06-17-2013, 12:56 PM
Quick and efficient reply...thank you sir.

thatsmrmastercraft
06-17-2013, 01:02 PM
You are most welcome. http://forums.catholic.com/images/smilies/ani/ani_tiphat.gif

Topp dawg
12-03-2014, 10:18 AM
How do I know which stud size I have from that chart? I have a 2003 Mastercraft X-10 with factory trailer.

thatsmrmastercraft
12-03-2014, 10:44 AM
How do I know which stud size I have from that chart? I have a 2003 Mastercraft X-10 with factory trailer.

You have 1/2" studs. Some lugs nuts are stamped with the size.

thatsmrmastercraft
12-03-2014, 10:47 AM
Also, be sure to re-torque after 50 miles, and again after another 50 - 100 miles. I sell quite a few wheels to people who have had their wheel fall off while going down the road.

Topp dawg
12-03-2014, 10:48 AM
You have 1/2" studs. Some lugs nuts are stamped with the size.

Thanks man. That was quick. I just bought the torque wrench from harbor freight that you posted a link to a while back. I got it for $17.99. Thanks again.

thatsmrmastercraft
12-03-2014, 12:25 PM
Thanks man. That was quick. I just bought the torque wrench from harbor freight that you posted a link to a while back. I got it for $17.99. Thanks again.

Always happy to help where I can. http://www.sherv.net/cm/emoticons/hello/hats-off-salute-smiley-emoticon.gif The HF torque wrench is a heck of a deal.

bobx1
12-03-2014, 03:11 PM
Also, be sure to re-torque after 50 miles, and again after another 50 - 100 miles. I sell quite a few wheels to people who have had their wheel fall off while going down the road.

How would you ever find the time to ski/board/surf/tube if you spent your entire trip checking lugs? Are all tire guys this OCD or is it just you Peter? :D

thatsmrmastercraft
12-03-2014, 03:25 PM
How would you ever find the time to ski/board/surf/tube if you spent your entire trip checking lugs? Are all tire guys this OCD or is it just you Peter? :D

Sometime I think it is just me when I look at how many time I have to sell another tire/wheel to a customer who had one come off. :rolleyes:

scott023
12-03-2014, 03:57 PM
Sometime I think it is just me when I look at how many time I have to sell another tire/wheel to a customer who had one come off. :rolleyes:

Hmm. Might just be my thoughts, but if it's happening that often, perhaps you should be educating your customers better. 8p

thatsmrmastercraft
12-03-2014, 05:14 PM
Hmm. Might just be my thoughts, but if it's happening that often, perhaps you should be educating your customers better. 8p

Pipe down canucklehead. http://i717.photobucket.com/albums/ww173/prestonjjrtr/Smileys/Canada/flag_canada_text1.gif

scott023
12-03-2014, 08:21 PM
Pipe down canucklehead. http://i717.photobucket.com/albums/ww173/prestonjjrtr/Smileys/Canada/flag_canada_text1.gif

Truth hurts? :purplaugh:purplaugh:purplaugh

thatsmrmastercraft
12-03-2014, 09:35 PM
Truth hurts? :purplaugh:purplaugh:purplaugh

Not even a little. I feel bad if only one of my customers loses a wheel. The frustration involved in delaying a trip and the potential hazards involved when you need to do an emergency stop are nothing a guy wants to deal with, not to mention having to buy another wheel and possibly another tire. I do my best to educate them, and everyone on this great forum, to take the few minutes necessary to maintain their trailer in a safe manner.

Scott, I really don't see how you can make light of a situation like this. :rant:


































OK............I know you are just having fun. :D:D:D

scott023
12-03-2014, 09:53 PM
Not even a little. I feel bad if only one of my customers loses a wheel. The frustration involved in delaying a trip and the potential hazards involved when you need to do an emergency stop are nothing a guy wants to deal with, not to mention having to buy another wheel and possibly another tire. I do my best to educate them, and everyone on this great forum, to take the few minutes necessary to maintain their trailer in a safe manner.

Scott, I really don't see how you can make light of a situation like this. :rant:


































OK............I know you are just having fun. :D:D:D

I always make sure to re torque nuts after my seasonal change overs. I really don't like the idea of seeing my wheel passing me going down the road.

thatsmrmastercraft
12-03-2014, 10:08 PM
I always make sure to re torque nuts after my seasonal change overs. I really don't like the idea of seeing my wheel passing me going down the road.

It happened to me once on my truck after doing a brake job years ago. My brother, the mechanical engineer put the wheel on and evidently didn't seat the wheel and didn't use a star pattern when he tightened the lugs. I ran the torque wrench, but it didn't matter at that point. It was two days before leaving for vacation. The wheels I had on the truck were American Eagle and they didn't have the matching wheel in town. I had to buy a used wheel at an inflated price from a salvage yard since I didn't have time to shop, then pay for the new wheel and take a bath on the used wheel selling it. Plus the drum brakes all came apart, drum was shot, studs had to be replaced, truck had to be towed, and I was late for work. I have installed my own wheels since then.

scott023
12-04-2014, 12:14 AM
It happened to me once on my truck after doing a brake job years ago. My brother, the mechanical engineer put the wheel on and evidently didn't seat the wheel and didn't use a star pattern when he tightened the lugs. I ran the torque wrench, but it didn't matter at that point. It was two days before leaving for vacation. The wheels I had on the truck were American Eagle and they didn't have the matching wheel in town. I had to buy a used wheel at an inflated price from a salvage yard since I didn't have time to shop, then pay for the new wheel and take a bath on the used wheel selling it. Plus the drum brakes all came apart, drum was shot, studs had to be replaced, truck had to be towed, and I was late for work. I have installed my own wheels since then.

Ouch, that's a tough deal.

roadster02
12-10-2014, 06:16 PM
In 45 years of driving, I have had three boats, one travel trailer, three 3/4 ton pickup trucks, six cars, three enclosed utility car hauler trailers, tandem and single axle. I have never used a torque wrench, or an impact driver to install the lug nuts on ANY of these vehicles. I have NEVER broken a stud, or had a nut loosen in all of the mentioned vehicles at any time. I have driven, or towed all of them local, and long distance. On all of them I put the lug nuts on by hand with a 4 way lug wrench, I will not allow the tire changing companies to put them on with an impact, or use a T wrench. I put them on snug them down, just human power. IMHO all of that T wrench nonsense is just that. Have you ever been out on a lonely highway in the middle of nowhere and had to take those torqued nuts off with the wrench supplied by the car manufacturer? Yeah, I have, result, bent wrench and inability to remove flat tire from vehicle, that's why mine are put on by hand. And, no I'm not carrying a trunkful of tools to change a tire, the ones that come with the car are very adequate provided the lug nuts are not given the "death grip".

curver900
12-11-2014, 01:05 PM
Discount tire here does all the final lugs with a hand held torque wrench.. and I have never had any issues with them... Hand held whether a torque wrench or by hand... by hand is the key... like trying to take off a oil filter do they impact wrench those bstrds too???:mad:

thatsmrmastercraft
12-11-2014, 02:08 PM
In 45 years of driving, I have had three boats, one travel trailer, three 3/4 ton pickup trucks, six cars, three enclosed utility car hauler trailers, tandem and single axle. I have never used a torque wrench, or an impact driver to install the lug nuts on ANY of these vehicles. I have NEVER broken a stud, or had a nut loosen in all of the mentioned vehicles at any time. I have driven, or towed all of them local, and long distance. On all of them I put the lug nuts on by hand with a 4 way lug wrench, I will not allow the tire changing companies to put them on with an impact, or use a T wrench. I put them on snug them down, just human power. IMHO all of that T wrench nonsense is just that. Have you ever been out on a lonely highway in the middle of nowhere and had to take those torqued nuts off with the wrench supplied by the car manufacturer? Yeah, I have, result, bent wrench and inability to remove flat tire from vehicle, that's why mine are put on by hand. And, no I'm not carrying a trunkful of tools to change a tire, the ones that come with the car are very adequate provided the lug nuts are not given the "death grip".

I am hoping that you are not an airline mechanic in charge of checking the torque on wing bolts.

thatsmrmastercraft
12-11-2014, 02:17 PM
Discount tire here does all the final lugs with a hand held torque wrench.. and I have never had any issues with them... Hand held whether a torque wrench or by hand... by hand is the key... like trying to take off a oil filter do they impact wrench those bstrds too???:mad:

Old school thought on lug nuts and oil filters is they need to stay in place, and it seems to continue on oil filters. More service shops are realizing the hard way that failing to properly torque a wheel in place leaves you open to litigation if a customer's wheel comes off. It only takes an extra 5 minutes for a shop to hand torque wheels and it has the potential to save a ton of money.

roadster02
12-11-2014, 04:31 PM
You ever change one of your own tires? You ever rotate your tires in the driveway?Handheld or not, if you torque wrench your lug nuts to 70 to 90 ft lbs you ain't gonna get them off with out a large, strong tire tool and a lot of muscle, or an impact. If you don't happen to have these heavy tools available you are screwed. The nuts just don't have to be welded on to the studs!! I maintain tightening by hand will be sufficient. Has never failed me, anyone in my family, or anyone else I know that does it without the torque wrench. JMHO

Discount tire here does all the final lugs with a hand held torque wrench.. and I have never had any issues with them... Hand held whether a torque wrench or by hand... by hand is the key... like trying to take off a oil filter do they impact wrench those bstrds too???:mad:

MattsCraft
12-11-2014, 05:55 PM
I have to agree with roadster on this one for the most part. I have never owned a torque wrench, so 100% have never torqued a wheel lug. I have had several trailers, completed countless driveway break break jobs and rotations etc. Knocking on wood, never had a wheel come off.

Now I will say on my first tandem boat trailer with steel chromed rims, they would loosen all the time. On long trips 300 miles or so I would have to re-tighten a few of the lugs on each wheel, of course as stated above, don't own a torque wrench so could not tell you how tight they were, but using the tried and true method of snug, cross pattern tight with the 4 way, and then just a last nice grunt... That's good method on each.;)

Now a big difference I think is the alloy rims, my last MC trailer as well as this one have them and I have never had a loose lug... Again, above been leery from my steel rim trailer so I check them regularly and they are snug as a bug.

As roadster stated, I have had lugs that are so tight, the stupid little wrench the car companies give you, for get about it, even a 4 way could not get them off, only option was a big arse pry bar and a pipe extension. Good thing I was in my driveway and not on the side of the road. I believe the the basis is all around steel rims, and certainly engineers want a specification for everything. IMO, with the alloy rims almost all cars are coming with today, due to how they heat up, impact tight is way to tight, again, IMO.:D I have been a back yard wrench time and again for 40 years, and to date knocking on wood one more time, no wheel I have removed and replaced has come off by hand tightening.

I'd rather be lucky than good any day of the week!:rolleyes:

blackhawk
12-11-2014, 11:57 PM
The purpose of tightening any critical bolted joint is to induce the proper stress into the bolt. This stress is typically 80% of the yield strength of the bolt material. (A lot of other factors are involved, but this is a general rule.) The proper stress actually stretches the bolt but not so much that it will not return back to its original shape. This stress/stretch in the bolted joint prevents loosening of the fasteners. Over torquing can obviously over stretch the bolt past its material yield point, causing it to snap off, or set it up for a fatigue failure later on. Not enough torque and you run the risk of the bolted joint coming loose or having premature wear. Anytime you are fastening something with multiple bolts, even torque to all the bolts makes sure the pressures within the assembly are uniform.

flyguy570
12-12-2014, 07:31 AM
The purpose of tightening any critical bolted joint is to induce the proper stress into the bolt. This stress is typically 80% of the yield strength of the bolt material. (A lot of other factors are involved, but this is a general rule.) The proper stress actually stretches the bolt but not so much that it will not return back to its original shape. This stress/stretch in the bolted joint prevents loosening of the fasteners. Over torquing can obviously over stretch the bolt past its material yield point, causing it to snap off, or set it up for a fatigue failure later on. Not enough torque and you run the risk of the bolted joint coming loose or having premature wear. Anytime you are fastening something with multiple bolts, even torque to all the bolts makes sure the pressures within the assembly are uniform.

I completely agree with you on this and wanted to expand on your statement a little...

The lug studs when properly torqued are still in the elastic deformation range which is exactly as it sounds the bolt will have the tendency to return to its original shape when released. It is that tendency holes pressure on the lug nut keeping it from loosening. Now if the lug is ever over tightened and ends up in the plastic deformation range the tendency to return to its original shape is gone. Therefore your lug nuts will always tend to loosen because the elasticity is gone. This holds true even if you re tighten them to a proper torque. I do agree that using and impact to tighten your lugs is not the best method, but doing it by hand and giving it a good grunt isn't the best either. Either way to each is own if it's works this long why change it? (To be fair I don't always use a torque wrench either)

Ryan
12-12-2014, 01:58 PM
I always make sure to re torque nuts after my seasonal change overs. I really don't like the idea of seeing my wheel passing me going down the road.

I had that happen once... no es bueno. Feels like being in a wierd, sad version of a roadrunner cartoon.

curver900
12-12-2014, 03:35 PM
Old school thought on lug nuts and oil filters is they need to stay in place, and it seems to continue on oil filters. More service shops are realizing the hard way that failing to properly torque a wheel in place leaves you open to litigation if a customer's wheel comes off. It only takes an extra 5 minutes for a shop to hand torque wheels and it has the potential to save a ton of money.

Ron White does a great skit on his wheel coming off after getting new tires at Sears... pretty funny...Lug nut school... and all!

thatsmrmastercraft
12-12-2014, 04:52 PM
Ron White does a great skit on his wheel coming off after getting new tires at Sears... pretty funny...Lug nut school... and all!

I will have to check that out. Ron White is hilarious.

mzimme
12-12-2014, 05:40 PM
You guys might need to lift some weights if you cant get a torqued lug nut off. Put a little muscle behind it you sissy boys! That, or carry your AAA card and ask your wife to make the phone call for you since you're a Nancy anyway. Sheesh.

I've NEVER had a problem getting a torqued lug nut off. An OVERtorqued maybe, but never a properly torqued lug nut. Does it suck when it's hot out and you need to muscle up while you're wearing slacks and a button down? Yeah... but it's life. Deal with it.

My gawd!!

thatsmrmastercraft
12-12-2014, 05:50 PM
You guys might need to lift some weights if you cant get a torqued lug nut off. Put a little muscle behind it you sissy boys! That, or carry your AAA card and ask your wife to make the phone call for you since you're a Nancy anyway. Sheesh.

I've NEVER had a problem getting a torqued lug nut off. An OVERtorqued maybe, but never a properly torqued lug nut. Does it suck when it's hot out and you need to muscle up while you're wearing slacks and a button down? Yeah... but it's life. Deal with it.

My gawd!!

:uglyhamme:uglyhamme:uglyhamme

roadster02
12-12-2014, 08:18 PM
No problem here with muscle, just can't seem to find room for the cheater bar I would need to carry, and can't afford the special titanium tools that won't break.

But maybe I should hit those nasty lug nuts with my purse.

You guys might need to lift some weights if you cant get a torqued lug nut off. Put a little muscle behind it you sissy boys! That, or carry your AAA card and ask your wife to make the phone call for you since you're a Nancy anyway. Sheesh.

I've NEVER had a problem getting a torqued lug nut off. An OVERtorqued maybe, but never a properly torqued lug nut. Does it suck when it's hot out and you need to muscle up while you're wearing slacks and a button down? Yeah... but it's life. Deal with it.

My gawd!!

scott023
12-13-2014, 01:04 PM
You guys might need to lift some weights if you cant get a torqued lug nut off. Put a little muscle behind it you sissy boys! That, or carry your AAA card and ask your wife to make the phone call for you since you're a Nancy anyway. Sheesh.

I've NEVER had a problem getting a torqued lug nut off. An OVERtorqued maybe, but never a properly torqued lug nut. Does it suck when it's hot out and you need to muscle up while you're wearing slacks and a button down? Yeah... but it's life. Deal with it.

My gawd!!

Lmao. Classic post.

curver900
12-15-2014, 09:46 AM
Ron White

http://www.bing.com/videos/search?q=Ron+White+Tire+Fell+Off&Form=VQFRVP#view=detail&mid=35952EB10CFC9B1C415B35952EB10CFC9B1C415B

enjoy!

Forrest-X45
12-15-2014, 05:38 PM
Ron White does a great skit on his wheel coming off after getting new tires at Sears... pretty funny...Lug nut school... and all!

Or go to Les Schwab here in the Northwest. It's a common occurrence to watch your wheel fall off after getting your tires rotated. They suck and I wouldn't even take a basketball to them.