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sberry3827
10-04-2005, 08:58 PM
O.K. So I am not exactly mechanical illiterit, but I need some info. I cant seem to find exactly what I'm looking for in any previous threads. I am unfortunately looking into winterizing my MC, first year MC owner. How do I put the antifreeze in the block. I want to assume that I can put 5 gallons in a bucket, put the intake hose in and start it up until the bucket is empty. Is this correct? Thanks for any input.

mszelenyi
10-04-2005, 09:04 PM
I have tried this on another inboard I own with a similar type of raw water pump and for some reason the pump doesn't seem able to draw the antifreeze up into the motor.

On the Mastercraft you should be able to drain the block using the drains mounted on the side of the block and back of the exhaust manifolds. I couldn't get my manifold plugs out so I removed the hoses from the thermostat housing and poured antifreeze into each of them...about 1/2 gallon to each side.

SkySkiSpokane
10-04-2005, 09:07 PM
OK so you may have caught this from the other threads but just a reminder:
If you have an LT1 or any of the other Aluminum blocks DO NOT use antifreeze. Otherwise winterizing is pretty easy. Good luck.

Laurel_Lake_Skier
10-04-2005, 09:31 PM
The way I do mine is to drain the block and exhaust manifolds with the valves/plugs first. Once the water is all drained, close the drain valves but leave the plugs out of the manifolds. Then remove the water hoses from the exhaust manifolds and put a stopper in one of them. Fill your bucket full of antifreeze and stick the intake hose from the raw water pump (pulled from the transmision cooler) in the antifreeze and the hose from the exhaust over the bucket. Start the engine and you will run the antifreeze in a loop, bucket, engine, back to bucket. Let the engine run like that for a little while to ensure any remaining water is replaced by antifreeze. When you finish, put a stopper in the hose that returned water to the bucket. The heat from running the engine will dry the manifolds pretty quickly. You may also have a drain in your muffler to get water out of there and I pull the hose from the back of the trans cooler as well to be sure it is drained. While you have it off, clear out any debris that might have found its way in there.

SKI*MC
10-04-2005, 10:03 PM
i dont know if this is good, but we dont use Anti-freeze. We run it dry and pull all the plugs out of the block. Take off the raw water pump and fog the cylendars.

Todd Brosius
10-04-2005, 10:41 PM
First I bring the motor up to operating temperature, then I remove the correct hoses and attempt to drain water from the motor/block. I have a shower and heater. I attempt to blow out the heater then reconnect. I remove the intake hose from the raw water pump, NOT the hose from the bottom of the boat. I then lay some towels on the floor and carefully fill a 5 gallon bucket with straight antifreeze - NOT RV antifreeze. I use automotive antifreeze. I made myself a short (clear) plastic hose which I then stick into the bucket and connect the other end to the raw water pump with clamp! This way the pump only has to move the antifreeze about 2 feet and it's into the pump then into the motor. The clear hose allows me to make sure the pump "sucks" immediately and obviously the bucket also empties and you can watch the antifreeze go down. I error on the side of caution. I used about 6 gallons of antifreeze last year. I start the motor, turn on my shower and wait until my shower and exhaust turn green then hit the flame arrestor, which I had already removed with fogging oil and then she dies! I will then revive next spring and change oil.

BeavenX5
10-04-2005, 10:41 PM
I read somewhere in here that if you are using the bucket and raw water pump method you also have to either let the engine cool down or remove the thermostat if you wnat the antifreeze to make its way into the engine. Kind of important.

6ballsisall
10-04-2005, 11:28 PM
I used the 5 gallon bucket method last year on our 86' and it worked great. I pulled the intake hose off the thru hull port and dropped it in the bucket. Turned the hose on and filled the bucket then started the motor. Let the motor get up to operating temp running water run thru the block. When at operating temp poor in your antifreeze mix into the bucket and go thru all 5 gallons. Worked like a champ and wasn't that difficult at all.

6ballsisall
10-04-2005, 11:30 PM
I read somewhere in here that if you are using the bucket and raw water pump method you also have to either let the engine cool down or remove the thermostat if you wnat the antifreeze to make its way into the engine. Kind of important.

You could just remove the thermostat if you wanted to save some time letting the motor warm up. But yes, you need to get the block up to temp or pull the stat

bigmac
10-05-2005, 06:46 AM
I haven't tried it, but the Flush-Pro (http://www.skidim.com/prodinfo.asp?number=DP7) from Perko looks promising. It's pretty cheap, and ought to be a pretty simple installation.

http://www.skidim.com/images/43092.jpg

It goes inline on the intake hose between the hull intake and the raw water pump. Automatic valve, pressure from the garden hose closes off the raw water intake. You can hook a garden hose up to it to run the boat in your driveway and warm it up for oil change, tranny fluid change, and to get the engine up to temp to open the thermostat. Then you can apparently seal the hull intake and it will draw RV antifreeze from a bucket using that same garden hose. Make sure the antifreeze gets into your heater core, if you have one. And don't forget ballast tanks, if you have them.

mitch
10-05-2005, 08:40 AM
i dont know if this is good, but we dont use Anti-freeze. We run it dry and pull all the plugs out of the block. Take off the raw water pump and fog the cylendars.

What does take off the raw water pump mean? Thx

BuoyChaser
10-05-2005, 08:49 AM
i use the FLUSH-PRO on my '85 and it works great...just don't lose the black plastic piece on the cap, that's what you need to hook up a short extension of garden hose to run into your antifreeze jug...works pretty slick, you just put that cap in, then doesn't require water pressure to suck in antifreeze...

i drain all the plugs first, make sure to get all the plugs open to remove any sand...

i always run the boat until it gets up to temperature, that way the thermostat opens and allows antifreeze to run throughout the system...i always use antifreeze in the '85 because it coats the insides and keeps them from rusting, otherwise over winter you get condensation inside with causes rust...

be sure to poke a screwdriver through all the plug holes...had a buddy who found his were clogged with sand/rust and never ran antifreeze through...he ended up replacing his EXHAUST MANIFOLDS in the spring, OUCH!!!

BeavenX5
10-05-2005, 08:59 AM
What does take off the raw water pump mean? Thx
Taking the raw water pump out means removing the impeller from its case to avoid having it stick to the housing over winter and "eat the blades" when starting the boat in the spring.
To do that, remove the 4 small screws from the front of the pump (carefull removing the gasket if you don't have a spare one) and remove the impeller.
My problem last week-end was that I could not get the impeller out without risking damaging it, it was very tight. Any advice on how to get the impeller out of its housing?

bigmac
10-05-2005, 09:04 AM
The concept of winterization is completely draining the block, exhaust manifolds, raw water lines, circulating pump, heater, and shower, as opposed to just pumping antifreeze throughout the whole system and leaving it undrained. My dealer just does the latter and doesn't drain. One advantage to that is that returning to service in the spring is just installing the battery and putting the boat in the lake and you're good to go. No reinstalling all of those hoses and plugs, which need to be left disconnected all winter.

In their owner's manual (available as download here (http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/local_links.php?action=links&catid=2) ), MasterCraft pretty thoroughly details draining the block and pumps - they make no mention of using antifreeze in the engine. As part of adequately draining the engine, the hoses to and from the raw water pump need to be disconnected and emptied. You don't need to remove the raw water pump, but they do recommend changing the impeller every year, so they show how to remove the cover on the pump and pull the impeller, leaving it out all winter and replacing with a new one in the spring. I can see how that would be very simple in a direct drive boat - just lift the engine cover and it's right there in front. But with a V-drive the engine is in backwards so some body contortions are necessary to get to the raw water pump, or even the hoses, since you have to get into the rear of the boat between the pump and the exhaust silencer to accomplish that pump maintenance.

bigmac
10-05-2005, 09:07 AM
i use the FLUSH-PRO on my '85 and it works great...just don't lose the black plastic piece on the cap, that's what you need to hook up a short extension of garden hose to run into your antifreeze jug...works pretty slick, you just put that cap in, then doesn't require water pressure to suck in antifreeze...

i drain all the plugs first, make sure to get all the plugs open to remove any sand...

i always run the boat until it gets up to temperature, that way the thermostat opens and allows antifreeze to run throughout the system...i always use antifreeze in the '85 because it coats the insides and keeps them from rusting, otherwise over winter you get condensation inside with causes rust...

be sure to poke a screwdriver through all the plug holes...had a buddy who found his were clogged with sand/rust and never ran antifreeze through...he ended up replacing his EXHAUST MANIFOLDS in the spring, OUCH!!!


http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/showpost.php?p=104984&postcount=63

BuoyChaser
10-05-2005, 09:20 AM
BIGMAC - thanks for the links with pics...i'm also attached a PDF of the catalog page directly from PERKO...

mitch
10-05-2005, 09:28 AM
The concept of winterization is completely draining the block, exhaust manifolds, raw water lines, circulating pump, heater, and shower, as opposed to just pumping antifreeze throughout the whole system and leaving it undrained. My dealer just does the latter and doesn't drain. One advantage to that is that returning to service in the spring is just installing the battery and putting the boat in the lake and you're good to go. No reinstalling all of those hoses and plugs, which need to be left disconnected all winter.

In their owner's manual (available as download here (http://www.tmcowners.com/teamtalk/local_links.php?action=links&catid=2) ), MasterCraft pretty thoroughly details draining the block and pumps - they make no mention of using antifreeze in the engine. As part of adequately draining the engine, the hoses to and from the raw water pump need to be disconnected and emptied. You don't need to remove the raw water pump, but they do recommend changing the impeller every year, so they show how to remove the cover on the pump and pull the impeller, leaving it out all winter and replacing with a new one in the spring. I can see how that would be very simple in a direct drive boat - just lift the engine cover and it's right there in front. But with a V-drive the engine is in backwards so some body contortions are necessary to get to the raw water pump, or even the hoses, since you have to get into the rear of the boat between the pump and the exhaust silencer to accomplish that pump maintenance.


If you can pull this off in MN (i.e., no antifreeze) then the rest of us s/b good to go. I've used heated storage the past few years for my 00 205, so I never worried, but this year I'm out in the cold. I never used antifreeze in my 89 MC, and I was OK, so this raises my confidence level. Thanks.

mitch
10-05-2005, 09:31 AM
Taking the raw water pump out means removing the impeller from its case to avoid having it stick to the housing over winter and "eat the blades" when starting the boat in the spring.
To do that, remove the 4 small screws from the front of the pump (carefull removing the gasket if you don't have a spare one) and remove the impeller.
My problem last week-end was that I could not get the impeller out without risking damaging it, it was very tight. Any advice on how to get the impeller out of its housing?

I gotcha! I replace mine every spring anyway, and I also can not get it out w/o chewing the crap out of it. Thanks!

bigmac
10-05-2005, 09:31 AM
BIGMAC - thanks for the links with pics...i'm also attached a PDF of the catalog page directly from PERKO...

I guess the problem with antifreeze pumping through the Flush Pro would be getting it in under enough pressure to keep the check valve closed. The pressure forcing the antifreeze in would have to be greater than the negative pressure from the raw water pump minus the pressure supplied by the check-valve spring in the Flush Pro. I wonder how much pressure that is...a garden hose will develop 50 psi or so, but things like a drill pump will only do somewhere between 6-15 psi.

vogelm1
10-05-2005, 09:31 AM
Not sure if you need to bother adding anti-freeze - it's extra work that you don't need to do. I just bought an '05 ProStar this summer and was really researching this...after spending that amount of $$ I wanted to be darn sure the engine wasn't damaged this winter. And I live in northern Wisconsin. My dealer ASSURED me that by doing the following, I'd be fine:

1) uncouple the manifold drain hose (garden hose-type fittings) that run around the rear of the motor and allow to drain; 2) remove brass plugs from left and right manifolds; 3) remove brass plug from left side of block and Knock Sensor from right side; 4) remove both hoses from raw water pump, pull impeller (two paint can openers inserted on either side and behind it work very well); 5) remove large diameter hose going to water circulating pump (above raw water pump); 6) remove and check for debris, the hose running from raw water pump to transmission cooler. You're done!! Leave all the hoses disconnected and plugs out 'till spring.

My dealer also winterizes using this process. All they do is inboards and they've had no problems. I asked about muck or sand possibly being in the block and holding water....water remaining in the "corners" of the block because the engine sits at an angle in the boat - so all water can't possibly drain out- they again assured me everything would be fine. I did mine following the instructions above a few days ago and she's put to bed. If anyone has done it this way and had problems, let me know!! Thanks and good luck -

sberry3827
10-05-2005, 12:21 PM
Thanks for all the replies, so many methods to choose from. I think i'll opt for jrandols quick and easy method. Thanks again, just needed to make sure i still have a boat that works in the spring. :)

pup
10-05-2005, 08:17 PM
If you want to add anti-freeze to the engine, you do not have to run the engine up to temp or remove the t/stat. After the block & manifolds are drained, remove the outlet hose from the impeller pump (leave it connected to the tranny cooler) & lift it up so it is higher than the engine. Stick a funnel in it & start pouring the anti-freeze in. This will fill the engine just like the impeller pump would do , only difference is the engine is not running. When the anti-freeze comes out the exhaust pipes, the engine & manifolds are full. The engine will fill up with the t-stat installed.

bigmac
10-05-2005, 08:23 PM
If you want to add anti-freeze to the engine, you do not have to run the engine up to temp or remove the t/stat. After the block & manifolds are drained, remove the outlet hose from the impeller pump (leave it connected to the tranny cooler) & lift it up so it is higher than the engine. Stick a funnel in it & start pouring the anti-freeze in. This will fill the engine just like the impeller pump would do , only difference is the engine is not running. When the anti-freeze comes out the exhaust pipes, the engine & manifolds are full. The engine will fill up with the t-stat installed.

But...it needs to be up to temp anyway to change the engine and transmission oil...

6ballsisall
10-05-2005, 09:53 PM
But...it needs to be up to temp anyway to change the engine and transmission oil...


Tru dat :D

pup
10-05-2005, 10:35 PM
When I winterize, I run the engine for a few minutes & then fog it. I add anti-freeze after changing the oil & filters. Using a funnel to gravity feed the engine works well & is potentially less messy than lumping 5 gallon buckets of anti-freeze into the boat.
Every fall there are always lots of posts on this subject so I thought I would add one .

bigmac
10-05-2005, 11:13 PM
When I winterize, I run the engine for a few minutes & then fog it. I add anti-freeze after changing the oil & filters. Using a funnel to gravity feed the engine works well & is potentially less messy than lumping 5 gallon buckets of anti-freeze into the boat.
Every fall there are always lots of posts on this subject so I thought I would add one .

Lotsa right ways to do it, no doubt. I've had boats in Minnesota for over 20 years, but I gotta confess that the whole antifreeze thing is pretty new in my experience. I've never done anything other than just draining the block/pumps etc and never had a problem. I'm going to rely on my dealer to do the fogging and oil changes since I dont' have a good way to run this boat in my driveway yet. He's going to then just run the RV antifreeze in and I'll bring it home, take the battery out and tuck it away. But I confess - I'm going to drain it first...

Kevin 89MC
10-06-2005, 03:47 PM
All I've done for the last 9 years is open the 2 manifold drains, open the 2 engine drains, take the hose off the t-stat housing and pour a gallon of antifreeze in. I installed the brass drain plugs from Skidim this spring, so now it will be even easier. I also drain the hose from the water pick-up, good chance to clean the strainer too. This is from an old MC mechanic who seemed to know his stuff. It's made it through a few 30 degree below spells with no cracked anything so far. I do take the boat out for one last pleasure cruise (usually by myself when it's about 40 degrees) to get it fully warmed up before changing the oil. It's a good excuse for a final boat ride!
Kevin

Oh yeah, I pull the impeller each fall, and replace it every 3-4 years, when it gets stiff. That thing is such a PITA to get out! I will try the "2 paint can opener" trick, or the "lube it & hit the starter" trick. I usually just grab it with a pliers and yank hard. Can't believe I've never ripped one-they're pretty tough!

east tx skier
10-06-2005, 04:24 PM
I was just eyeing that drain set at skidim today. But I keep hearing JimN's voice (whatever it sounds like) saying that petcocks can get clogged up and you're better off taking the whole plug out and digging around the hole with a coathang wire afterwards to make sure rust deposits or dirt or whatever isn't blocking the drain.

bigmac
10-06-2005, 06:18 PM
I was just eyeing that drain set at skidim today. But I keep hearing JimN's voice (whatever it sounds like) saying that petcocks can get clogged up and you're better off taking the whole plug out and digging around the hole with a coathang wire afterwards to make sure rust deposits or dirt or whatever isn't blocking the drain.

Changing the plugs to petcocks doesn't seem like it would help that much since removing those plugs isn't much of a chore compared to removing the hoses from the raw water pump, circulating pump, and heater core. Besides, fuel injected engines have the anti-knock sensor as one of the plugs, so it seems like a petcock wouldn't work there anyway. Plus the sediment issue blocking the petcock....

AirJunky
10-06-2005, 06:27 PM
Changing the plugs to petcocks doesn't seem like it would help that much since removing those plugs isn't much of a chore compared to removing the hoses from the raw water pump, circulating pump, and heater core. Besides, fuel injected engines have the anti-knock sensor as one of the plugs, so it seems like a petcock wouldn't work there anyway. Plus the sediment issue blocking the petcock....
The guys at the HO factory originally showed me how this install was done. I have petcocks on both sides to this day, including on the side with the anti-knock sensor. Plus I have the hoses joining the two exhaust manifolds. And radiator flush Ts on the heater hoses at their lowest point in the bilge. In 5 yrs, I've pulled the petcocks twice just to see how much rust & sediment there is....... very minimal.
The point in doing it? I can "winterize" the boat in less than a minute, sitting on the ramp, with no tools at all.
Next time any of you call HO/Hyperlite for any reason, ask for Bob or Eddie & ask how many problems they've had over the years with this install. Bob has the original green X-Star with no tower & last I talked with him, no problems with it. And say Hi for me. :wavey:

Kevin 89MC
10-06-2005, 06:48 PM
Yeah, I worried about the Skidim petcocks a bit too. I think they will actually be better than the original ones on the engine drains. I never did seem to get good flow out of those. The Skidim ones are pretty much wide open (ball valve), so they should flow better than the originals. Probably not as good at the manifolds, but those plugs were always a PITA to get off. They were pretty stripped, so I had to crank on them with vice-grips. If I had to do it over again, I think I'd just buy them for the manifolds, and just remove the engine plugs every fall. The manifold water would really shoot everywhere, so now I can just hook up a hose to make it cleaner.
Kevin

AirJunky
10-06-2005, 06:55 PM
If I had to do it over again, I think I'd just buy them for the manifolds, and just remove the engine plugs every fall. The manifold water would really shoot everywhere, so now I can just hook up a hose to make it cleaner.
Kevin

Kevin, have you seen how the exhaust is done on the newer MCs now days?

Manifold Drain Kit (http://mymastercraft.com/product_details.cfm?ITEM_ID=10&product=MAN%20DRAIN%20PLUG&product_type=GENERAL&company=MasterCraft&sub_product=Parts)

Works like a charm.

bigmac
10-06-2005, 08:53 PM
The guys at the HO factory originally showed me how this install was done. I have petcocks on both sides to this day, including on the side with the anti-knock sensor. Plus I have the hoses joining the two exhaust manifolds. And radiator flush Ts on the heater hoses at their lowest point in the bilge. In 5 yrs, I've pulled the petcocks twice just to see how much rust & sediment there is....... very minimal.
The point in doing it? I can "winterize" the boat in less than a minute, sitting on the ramp, with no tools at all.
Next time any of you call HO/Hyperlite for any reason, ask for Bob or Eddie & ask how many problems they've had over the years with this install. Bob has the original green X-Star with no tower & last I talked with him, no problems with it. And say Hi for me. :wavey:

AJ, tell me about the T's you put in the heater lines. Are those 3/4 inch fittings? Do they have caps that unscrew? I briefly cruised through an auto parts store looking for something like that but didn't see exactly what I wanted.

AirJunky
10-06-2005, 09:01 PM
AJ, tell me about the T's you put in the heater lines. Are those 3/4 inch fittings? Do they have caps that unscrew? I briefly cruised through an auto parts store looking for something like that but didn't see exactly what I wanted.
You got it, Mac. The Prestone Flush Kit comes with a pair of them. I believe 3/4" is right. And I think the kit comes with a couple in 2 different sizes.
http://www.honeywell.com.au/images/holts/prestone/pflush.jpg

bigmac
10-06-2005, 09:16 PM
You got it, Mac. The Prestone Flush Kit comes with a pair of them. I believe 3/4" is right. And I think the kit comes with a couple in 2 different sizes.
http://www.honeywell.com.au/images/holts/prestone/pflush.jpg

Bingo! :)


.

Kevin 89MC
10-07-2005, 10:41 AM
AJ, cool manifold drain kit. Actually I drained mine last night, because the overnight temp got into the low 30's. I have the draincocks pointed to the bilge, and no water splashed on the carpet. :dance:
I won't have to even bother with attaching hose, unless I get anal and want to make sure I don't leave water in the bilge. It is always empty by the time I tow my boat 45 minutes to the storage place.
Kevin

BuoyChaser
10-07-2005, 10:49 AM
you can always do the OLD FASHION CHECK of temperatures, put out a cup of water and when it starts freezing, that's the night to winterize the boat...then your fingers get nice and numb handling the water and steal, BEST WAY to EXTEND the SEASON, PURE PROCRASTINATION!!!

i've been known to stick a light bulb, in an aluminum frame under the engine cover...always wondered what would happen if bulb broke and fumes ignited, but that's what insurance is for??? :D

east tx skier
10-07-2005, 12:24 PM
Those new-style manifold drain kits with the hoses was what I was looking for when I found the other set at ski dim. I may go with the hose-style just because otherwise, I'll end up completely unscrewing them just to be sure.

AirJunky
10-07-2005, 12:31 PM
AJ, cool manifold drain kit. Actually I drained mine last night, because the overnight temp got into the low 30's. I have the draincocks pointed to the bilge, and no water splashed on the carpet. :dance:
I won't have to even bother with attaching hose, unless I get anal and want to make sure I don't leave water in the bilge. It is always empty by the time I tow my boat 45 minutes to the storage place.
Kevin
Yea, this Manifold drain kit is nice just because you won't need any tools to break the hoses apart. I always hear of people having huge problems getting the manifold plugs off at the end of the year so this was an easy choice for me. On any of the newer boats, this kit is included. The hoses hook together while your running the boat, then break apart & drop down into the bilge when you need to drain the water from everything.

east tx skier
10-07-2005, 12:34 PM
Mine were a bear to get off the first time. Now, all plugs have teflon tape on them and come out with ease. I'd still like the hose kit for the manifolds though. My brother in law has one on his 99 Supra Comp.

dchatagnon
10-07-2005, 01:12 PM
To remove the impeller you can do it with 2 screw drivers on each side.
Then it should come easily.

Jaysonsmith
10-31-2005, 05:19 PM
OK so you may have caught this from the other threads but just a reminder:
If you have an LT1 or any of the other Aluminum blocks DO NOT use antifreeze. Otherwise winterizing is pretty easy. Good luck.


I have a 98 prostar 205 with the LT-! and have been using anti-freeze for five years now. What have I done? What is the problem?

east tx skier
10-31-2005, 05:52 PM
I just checked the really old thread where this was discussed at length. The "why not" doesn't seem to have be there. The source of the info was JimN.

bigmac
10-31-2005, 06:17 PM
I have a 98 prostar 205 with the LT-! and have been using anti-freeze for five years now. What have I done? What is the problem?


Good question. I can't figure it out either - I keep seeing that posted here, but I don't understand what the problem is.

RV antifreeze is propylene glycol with only phosphate for corrosion inhibition. Phophates in antifreeze have been commonly used over many years for corrosion protection in all sorts of engines, including the aluminum-head short-block LT1 Corvette engine, and they're put in RV antifreeze to prevent rusting of steel drinking water lines. I don't understand why RV antifreeze would damage an LT1 engine.

Lee Phillips
10-31-2005, 06:54 PM
Your winterizing tips seem simple. question...why not remove the intake hose from the bottom of the boat? I could not find a 2 1/2 hose at my local auto store. I am not familuar with the transmission cooler. Is every tranny cooled with water? Where is the intake hose for the cooler? I have the 330HP LTR engine and I was a little freaked out about spraying fogging oil in the flame arrestor, so I just pulled the plugs and fogged the cylanders. Is this adequate for 5 months of storage outside? I also am curious about the speedometer tubes. Do they hold water? I saw signs of water leaking from the tubes from the module under the dash. At the risk of sounding like a retard I ask these questions, but this east coast weather is harsh on a CA boy.

bigmac
10-31-2005, 08:48 PM
Your winterizing tips seem simple. question...why not remove the intake hose from the bottom of the boat? I could not find a 2 1/2 hose at my local auto store. I am not familuar with the transmission cooler. Is every tranny cooled with water? Where is the intake hose for the cooler? I have the 330HP LTR engine and I was a little freaked out about spraying fogging oil in the flame arrestor, so I just pulled the plugs and fogged the cylanders. Is this adequate for 5 months of storage outside? I also am curious about the speedometer tubes. Do they hold water? I saw signs of water leaking from the tubes from the module under the dash. At the risk of sounding like a retard I ask these questions, but this east coast weather is harsh on a CA boy.


The raw water intake hose is 1.25 inch inside diameter. Undo the two hose clamps where that hose is attached to the intake strainer and pull the hose off of it. Plug in a garden hose using parts you picked up at the Coast-to-Coast

http://mccollister.info/fitting.jpg

Turn on the hose, start the engine. If you want to, when the engine's up to temp, use the same intake hose to suck up about 5 gallons of RV antifreeze - it will take about 30 seconds - just enough time to thoroughly fog the engine by spraying foggin oil into the carb/TBI/MFI intake.

The transmission is oil-cooled. The transmission oil cooler has cold water rushing through it from the raw water pump on its way to the engine. Oil from the transmission is pumped around the outside of the transmission oil cooler, which acts as a heat exchanger, cools the oil, which is pumped back to the transmission and cools the transmission. Water is not pumped through the transmission.