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jchance
04-21-2013, 11:10 PM
Time for a new set. Opinions on who makes the best trailer tire for the price?

east tx skier
04-21-2013, 11:17 PM
I switched to Maxxis last year and have been pleased so far.

j.mccreight@hotmail.com
04-21-2013, 11:37 PM
Boy thats a loaded question. ;), I've had good year, carlisle, kuhmo and a couple other no name brands on my trailers, never wore any out tread wise, they always deteriorate, key to good tire survival is to just replace every 4-5 years regardless.

jchance
04-21-2013, 11:43 PM
My boat stays on a trolley indoors most of the time and the trailer sits in a shady spot in the woods next to my lakehouse. I am looking for something that will last over time with minimal dryrot, not tread wear. All opinions are welcome!

It's also curious that I remain a newbie since being a member to this site for 6 years!

j.mccreight@hotmail.com
04-21-2013, 11:47 PM
If your looking to protect from uv exposure, dry rot I would suggest covering the tires like the RV guys do and park on a slab or plywood, all tires will eventually deteriorate.

Newbie is based on post count not time.

bturner2
04-22-2013, 08:26 AM
I'm replacing my 6 year old Goodyear Marathon tires this year and still have no idea what to buy. I've never had a Goodyear failure over the 15 plus years of having them on my trailers but the Kumo's are impressive with the load range D rating on a 14" tire and a speed rating of 75 MPH. Everything else seems to be rated at load range C and 60 MPH which to me is just unrealistic.

In fairness there is a note on Tire Rack on the Goodyear Marathons stating that if speeds are increase to 75 that tire pressure should be increased by 10lbs which is what I have always done.

Then there's price. The Goodyears are significantly cheaper and more readily available than the Kumos. Still have time to figure it all out and will be watching this post to see what others have to say.....

TxsRiverRat
04-22-2013, 09:24 AM
Boy thats a loaded question. ;), I've had good year, carlisle, kuhmo and a couple other no name brands on my trailers, never wore any out tread wise, they always deteriorate, key to good tire survival is to just replace every 4-5 years regardless.

Ditto to everything above - thread can be closed now :D

SP Maristar
04-23-2013, 06:20 PM
I am in the same boat (pun intended). There seem to be many, many off name brands. All between 100-110 per tire. Even internet searches don't turn up a one stop review site to make it easy.

SP Maristar
04-23-2013, 06:57 PM
What is the consensus on balancing trailer tires? I don't think my current Marathons are.

drschemel
04-23-2013, 07:16 PM
These ones look interesting. And they have a 60 month replacement warranty based on treadwear and not time if one fails. With 3300# load capacity, a 2 tire trailer could hold 3 tons. Could be a good option for a single axle set up. Probably overkill for a double. Just a little pricey, but then isnt everything?
http://www.easternmarine.com/galaxy-8-145-lt-heavy-duty-tire-load-range-g

j.mccreight@hotmail.com
04-23-2013, 07:58 PM
What is the consensus on balancing trailer tires? I don't think my current Marathons are.

I always balance mine, trailer tires are notoriously bad about not being truly round.

I just put 6 tires on this last week and all 6 tires took more than 6oz to balance out. 16" wheels

Cloaked
04-23-2013, 08:58 PM
What is the consensus on balancing trailer tires? I don't think my current Marathons are.
Always................ why would one not balance a wheel for road use?

SP Maristar
04-23-2013, 09:58 PM
My factory ones have no wheel weights and more than one tire store that i called shopping prices asked if i wanted them balanced.

Miss Rita
04-23-2013, 10:30 PM
I know this is blasphemy, but on my tandem trailer I run passenger tires, P205/70-14 that are rated at about 1300 lbs when pumped up to maximum pressure, which is 44 PSI. The boat/trailer weighs about 4300 lbs. Since they're tandem, I have plenty of stability. Since they're passenger tires I don't have to worry about speed ratings (I never go over 70 mph anyway), and they're considerably cheaper than ST tires.

I wouldn't recommend doing this with a single axle trailer which would probably benefit from ST-rated tires

thatsmrmastercraft
04-23-2013, 11:34 PM
I always balance trailer tires. If you don't, they tend to bounce and cup. That produces a lot of heat which kills tires.

As far as running passenger tires, that is what is used in the low profile trailers, but XL tires are used which have a stiffer sidewall than a P-metric passenger tire. Sidewall flexing generates heat, which, as I have said, kills tires.

Running tires below their maximum tire pressure also allows more sidewall flexing, which....

wheelerd
04-24-2013, 12:31 AM
As far as running passenger tires, that is what is used in the low profile trailers, but XL tires are used which have a stiffer sidewall than a P-metric passenger tire. Sidewall flexing generates heat, which, as I have said, kills tires.


Typically trailers have much more side to side sway, therefore more lateral pressure on the sidewalls than on a passenger vehicle, hence the recommendation for specific tires for trailers. Not that passenger tires might work for someone for years if they only do a short tow back and forth to a lake. But with a $30k boat sitting on the trailer, the extra couple hundred dollars every few years for trailer-specific tires is worth the piece of mind.

Consider also, if a tire ever did blow and cause damage as a result, I think the insurance company could get ornery if an investigation showed passenger tires were installed on the trailer.

Miss Rita
04-24-2013, 11:37 AM
Typically trailers have much more side to side sway...

I think that statement has to be qualified. A travel trailer, or any trailer carrying a heavy load with a high center of gravity probably is more susceptible to side loads, crosswinds, etc. The gunwales of my boat are about 4 1/2 feet off the ground, it's low profile and not going to catch a lot of wind. I'm certain that the center of gravity of my boat and trailer is lower than the Tahoe that's pulling it.

So I agree that some trailers are more susceptible to side sway, but some are not. I'm comfortable that the four passenger tires on my trailer, pumped up to the maximum pressure of 44 psi, are providing good lateral stability. As I mentioned, I wouldn't try this if it was single axle trailer with only two tires.

I had to add that ST-rated Goodyear Marathons haven't had a stellar reputation for being safe and reliable.

Hogwild
04-24-2013, 02:34 PM
I went with some Gladiators, but probably don't have enough miles on them to comment on durability.

thatsmrmastercraft
04-24-2013, 04:23 PM
I went with some Gladiators, but probably don't have enough miles on them to comment on durability.

http://forums.catholic.com/images/smilies/ani/ani_tiphat.gif

wheelerd
04-24-2013, 06:27 PM
I think that statement has to be qualified. A travel trailer, or any trailer carrying a heavy load with a high center of gravity probably is more susceptible to side loads, crosswinds, etc. The gunwales of my boat are about 4 1/2 feet off the ground, it's low profile and not going to catch a lot of wind. I'm certain that the center of gravity of my boat and trailer is lower than the Tahoe that's pulling it.

So I agree that some trailers are more susceptible to side sway, but some are not. I'm comfortable that the four passenger tires on my trailer, pumped up to the maximum pressure of 44 psi, are providing good lateral stability. As I mentioned, I wouldn't try this if it was single axle trailer with only two tires.

My point was just that due to the inherent geometry between the tow vehicle and the trailer, there is a natural tendency for a trailer to sway to some degree. That is why tow vehicle length, trailer length, tongue weight, and leveling are so critical. It is for this reason that 5th wheel towing is preferable to hitch towing -- the overall geometry of having the tow point ahead of the rear axle makes for better stability.

Although a trailer may not physically be swaying that is not to say there are not side to side forces, which hopefully the tire-to-ground friction are overcoming at any given time. As you point out, these can be caused by side winds or passing trucks, but also in the absence of side wind -- varying road surfaces, driver steering maneuvers, speed changes, hills, etc. This is what heats up the sidewalls of the trailer tires. Granted, a double axle trailer provides greater stability. A four-wheeled steerable vehicle traveling at the same speed does not have the same lateral forces on the tires. Vehicles also have the advantage of dampened suspension which most trailers do not.

The problem is compounded nowadays I think with longer and heavier boats (necessitating longer trailers) and shorter-wheelbased SUV's (but powered and rated to tow heavier loads.)

onewheat
04-24-2013, 08:56 PM
This is from Discount Tire (http://www.discounttire.com/dtcs/infoTrailerTireFacts.dos). I found some of this very interesting, especially Speed, Time and Mileage remarks.

"Trailer Tire Applications
Trailer tires are designed for use on trailer axle positions only. They are not built to handle the loads applied to, or the traction required by, drive or steering axles.
Inflation
Always inflate trailer tires to the maximum inflation indicated on the sidewall.
Check inflation when the tires are cool and have not been exposed to the sun.
If the tires are hot to the touch from operation, add three psi to the max inflation.
Underinflation is the number one cause of trailer tire failure.
Load Carrying Capacity
All tires must be identical in size for the tires to properly manage the weight of the trailer.
The combined capacity of the tires must equal or exceed the Gross Vehicle Weight (GVW) of the axle.
The combined capacity of all of the tires should exceed the loaded trailer weight by 20 percent.
If the actual weight is not available, use the trailer GVW. If a tire fails on a tandem axle trailer, you should replace both tires on that side. The remaining tire is likely to have been subjected to excessive loading.
If the tires are replaced with tires of larger diameter, the tongue height may need to be adjusted to maintain proper weight distribution.
Speed
All "ST" tires have a maximum speed rating of 65 mph.
As heat builds up, the tire's structure starts to disintegrate and weaken.
The load carrying capacity gradually decreases as the heat and stresses generated by higher speed increases.

Time
Time and the elements weaken a trailer tire.
In approximately three years, roughly one-third of the tire's strength is gone.
Three to five years is the projected life of a normal trailer tire.
It is suggested that trailer tires be replaced after three to four years of service regardless of tread depth or tire appearance.

Mileage
Trailer tires are not designed to wear out.
The life of a trailer tire is limited by time and duty cycles.
The mileage expectation of a trailer tire is 5,000 to 12,000 miles.
Why Use An "ST" Tire
"ST" tires feature materials and construction to meet the higher load requirements and demands of trailering.
The polyester cords are bigger than they would be for a comparable "P" or "LT" tire.
The steel cords have a larger diameter and greater tensile strength to meet the additional load requirements.
"ST" tire rubber compounds contain more chemicals to resist weather and ozone cracking.
Storage
The ideal storage for trailer tires is in a cool, dark garage at maximum inflation.
Use tire covers to protect the tires from direct sunlight.
Use thin plywood sections between the tire and the pavement.
For long term storage, put the trailer on blocks to take the weight off the tires. Then lower the air pressure and cover the tires to protect them from direct sunlight.
Maintenance
Clean the tires using mild soap and water.
Do not use tire-care products containing alcohol or petroleum distillates.
Inspect the tires for any cuts, snags, bulges or punctures.
Check the inflation before towing and again before the return trip.
Keys to Avoiding Trouble
Make sure your rig is equipped with the proper tires.
Maintain the tires meticulously.
Replace trailer tires every three to five years, whether they look like they're worn out or not.
Trailer Tire Warranty
The Carlisle trailer tire warranty applies to the original purchaser for three years from the date of purchase or until the tread depth reaches 3/32".
The OE (original equipment) warranty goes into effect at the time of the trailer purchase

onewheat
04-24-2013, 11:35 PM
What size tire is should be on an '07 tandem - 205/75-14 (trailer is 200 miles away)? I can't remember and need a set too. I need to see who has what in stock that will fit.

mlawler34
04-25-2013, 01:36 AM
What size tire is should be on an '07 tandem - 205/75-14 (trailer is 200 miles away)? I can't remember and need a set too. I need to see who has what in stock that will fit.

The marathons that come on the trailer are 215/75R14. However I you are looking at the Khumo's they only come in 205, which I have not seen anyone have a problem with because they are load range d.

thatsmrmastercraft
04-25-2013, 02:16 AM
There shouldn't be any problems with availability of ST tires this time of year.

mlawler34
04-26-2013, 12:54 PM
Man I am having a hell of a time trying to find someone in my area that can get the Khumo's in. I need to get them on before memorial day!

mlawler34
04-26-2013, 01:41 PM
Contacted Maxxis through their website and they are willing to ship for free, so I may just go that route since everyone is happy with them as well

Cloaked
04-26-2013, 04:09 PM
Man I am having a hell of a time trying to find someone in my area that can get the Khumo's in. I need to get them on before memorial day!
Kumhos (trailer) are typically an item for specialty carriers like Tire Rack. Auto tire dealers around town do not carry them nor are they available to them. I don't know why. I ordered the Kumhos and then had the local Kumho dealer to mount.

205 x 14 on the standard MC supplied trailer...plenty of room under the fender for the 205.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Kumho&tireModel=Radial+857 Made in either Viet Nam or China....

I feel confident that the Maxxis is as good of a tire.. I mean, how good or bad can they be, comparatively...??? I never had any issues with the GY Marathon, but have seen too many other incidents, so I went Kumho... However I trailer very short distances to the ramp....

.

mzimme
04-26-2013, 04:59 PM
What should trailer tire lugs be torqued to?

Miss Rita
04-26-2013, 05:50 PM
1/2" lug nuts should be torqued 75-85 foot-lbs. I set my torque wrench on 90, would rather have them be 5 foot-lbs too tight instead of 5 foot-lbs too loose.

onewheat
04-26-2013, 06:06 PM
Contacted Maxxis through their website and they are willing to ship for free, so I may just go that route since everyone is happy with them as well

That is cool - the tire prices on their website seem a bit "spendy", but if they'll ship for that price, it isn't too bad.

Thrall
04-26-2013, 08:33 PM
Can't say enough about Kumho 857s. Don't have them on the boat yet but will next go around. Only 14"D rated tire out there.
Put a set on my sled trailer several years ago. Probably got 10-15 k mi on them now. No issues. Last trip was 2400 mi from WA toAK a week ago. Trailer was overloaded. Tires wore all the way thru the plywood floor from bouncing over about 1000 mi of frost heaved roads. Trip was either max possible speed on bad roads or haulin about 80mph.
No way those tires should have held up but they are none the worse for the wear

thatsmrmastercraft
04-27-2013, 11:33 AM
Kumhos (trailer) are typically an item for specialty carriers like Tire Rack. Auto tire dealers around town do not carry them nor are they available to them. I don't know why. I ordered the Kumhos and then had the local Kumho dealer to mount.

205 x 14 on the standard MC supplied trailer...plenty of room under the fender for the 205.

http://www.tirerack.com/tires/tires.jsp?tireMake=Kumho&tireModel=Radial+857 Made in either Viet Nam or China....

I feel confident that the Maxxis is as good of a tire.. I mean, how good or bad can they be, comparatively...??? I never had any issues with the GY Marathon, but have seen too many other incidents, so I went Kumho... However I trailer very short distances to the ramp....

.

There is nothing magical about getting Kumho tires. Many dealers won't stock them as they are expensive and not every customer's choice. the occasional tire shop has just one tire supplier but most have several options. Sometimes it just comes down to the tire shop guy not wanting to make an effort.

Cloaked
04-27-2013, 12:34 PM
There is nothing magical about getting Kumho tires. Many dealers won't stock them as they are expensive and not every customer's choice. the occasional tire shop has just one tire supplier but most have several options. Sometimes it just comes down to the tire shop guy not wanting to make an effort.My experience:
Cloaked: "Hello, Kumho dealer (KD), can you get me these 857s?"

KD: No we do not have access to those tires. Anything auto we can get, but trailer tires are not available to us."

Cloaked:" Why not?"

KD: " We can't order them and they have never been available to our wholesale buyers."

Cloaked: "OK, thanks."

$0.02

.

thatsmrmastercraft
04-27-2013, 02:53 PM
My experience:
Cloaked: "Hello, Kumho dealer (KD), can you get me these 857s?"

KD: No we do not have access to those tires. Anything auto we can get, but trailer tires are not available to us."

Cloaked:" Why not?"

KD: " We can't order them and they have never been available to our wholesale buyers."

Cloaked: "OK, thanks."

$0.02

.

That's where that lack of effort comes in.

Rossterman
04-27-2013, 02:54 PM
Posted in another post about 14" d rate Goodyear hmg u-haul tire that some on other forums are using. Not radial but much heavier construction than standard marathon so likely not the same quality issues (u-haul probably had them overbuilt so as not to suffer typical marathon problems). Price is cheap ($99) but aren't radials and aren't rated above 65mph. Looks to be made in canada. Looks like a good tire for the money but wanted to hear from actual users before deciding between these and Khumo's.

thatsmrmastercraft
04-27-2013, 02:56 PM
Posted in another post about 14" d rate Goodyear hmg u-haul tire that some on other forums are using. Not radial but much heavier construction than standard marathon so likely not the same quality issues (u-haul probably had them overbuilt so as not to suffer typical marathon problems). Price is cheap ($99) but aren't radials and aren't rated above 65mph. Looks to be made in canada. Looks like a good tire for the money but wanted to hear from actual users before deciding between these and Khumo's.

That is over-priced for a bias ply tire. Plenty of other good trailer tires out there in that price range.

onewheat
04-29-2013, 11:30 AM
What size tire is should be on an '07 tandem - 205/75-14 (trailer is 200 miles away)? I can't remember and need a set too. I need to see who has what in stock that will fit.

The marathons that come on the trailer are 215/75R14. However I you are looking at the Khumo's they only come in 205, which I have not seen anyone have a problem with because they are load range d.

A tandem comes with 215's? Positively? I have been calling around and everyone has 205's in stock, but no 215's. The one guy told me he couldn't even order 215's except in a bias-ply D range. I need to make sure that when I drive 200+ miles to get there, someone has tires in stock that will fit the trailer.

thatsmrmastercraft
04-29-2013, 12:08 PM
A tandem comes with 215's? Positively? I have been calling around and everyone has 205's in stock, but no 215's. The one guy told me he couldn't even order 215's except in a bias-ply D range. I need to make sure that when I drive 200+ miles to get there, someone has tires in stock that will fit the trailer.

Tandems normally come with ST205/75R14 however many trailers have room for the 215's. My last inventory statement said 114 in stock. You might be calling the wrong places.

SP Maristar
04-29-2013, 12:12 PM
I just replaced my stock Marathons on our tandem. They were ST215/75R14. I stuck with this size and they were readily available.

onewheat
04-29-2013, 12:44 PM
I just replaced my stock Marathons on our tandem. They were ST215/75R14. I stuck with this size and they were readily available.

Thanks - I was pretty sure that is what was on the trailer. There aren't a lot of options where the boat is. Wal-Mart told me they can't get 215's in a 14". There are a couple of other places nearby, but have only offered up off-brand tires. I'm not a fan (based on nothing other than my own paranoia about a name I don't know). I'm still trying to get a couple of other places to answer the phone.

SP Maristar
04-29-2013, 01:20 PM
My trailer is a '98 so it is possible that our tires are different. I do know mine were the factory tires though.

thatsmrmastercraft
04-29-2013, 01:27 PM
Thanks - I was pretty sure that is what was on the trailer. There aren't a lot of options where the boat is. Wal-Mart told me they can't get 215's in a 14". There are a couple of other places nearby, but have only offered up off-brand tires. I'm not a fan (based on nothing other than my own paranoia about a name I don't know). I'm still trying to get a couple of other places to answer the phone.

You might be better off going to a dedicated tire shop.

onewheat
04-29-2013, 04:42 PM
You might be better off going to a dedicated tire shop.

The local Goodyear tire store finally answered the phone and they don't stock them, but can have them in a day. That works for me! Now to drive down, get the boat/trailer up on stands, remove the wheels/tires and take them for a ride. If only they were like car tires where you could do endless burnouts on them to remove all traces of tread before replacing them... :D

thatsmrmastercraft
04-29-2013, 06:15 PM
The local Goodyear tire store finally answered the phone and they don't stock them, but can have them in a day. That works for me! Now to drive down, get the boat/trailer up on stands, remove the wheels/tires and take them for a ride. If only they were like car tires where you could do endless burnouts on them to remove all traces of tread before replacing them... :D

Good to hear you got the problem solved. Too many salesmen follow the rule of selling what is on hand to avoid buyer's remorse. Might keep the sale percentage numbers up, but not necessarily the same with customer satisfaction.

jchance
05-02-2013, 11:35 AM
OK, I spoke with several dealers in the area and got quotes from $85 to $130 per tire plus mount/balance.

I then spoke with a good friend who owns a large tire dealership and also is a large/semi/trailer tire remanufacturer. He told me that regardless of brand, I really would NOT see any difference in tire life. He told me that the real determinant of tire life of ST tires are the UV blockers and that there are no differences between any of the brands. In other words, they ALL dry rot the same. If you are looking for tread life, that is a different subject. Since my trailer mostly sits and probably only gets used for 500 miles a year, I went with the cheaper brand. I just had 5 D-stone tires mounted and balanced for $525 yesterday.

thatsmrmastercraft
05-02-2013, 01:41 PM
OK, I spoke with several dealers in the area and got quotes from $85 to $130 per tire plus mount/balance.

I then spoke with a good friend who owns a large tire dealership and also is a large/semi/trailer tire remanufacturer. He told me that regardless of brand, I really would NOT see any difference in tire life. He told me that the real determinant of tire life of ST tires are the UV blockers and that there are no differences between any of the brands. In other words, they ALL dry rot the same. If you are looking for tread life, that is a different subject. Since my trailer mostly sits and probably only gets used for 500 miles a year, I went with the cheaper brand. I just had 5 D-stone tires mounted and balanced for $525 yesterday.

You got it close to correct, but not quite. It is indeed the UV inhibitors that allow the tire to live through exposure to the elements. They don't all receive the same UV package and that is what determines their life. You may find that less expensive tires will out-perform name brand tires in this.

Tread life is truly another subject that is based upon tread design and tire compound. Cleaner rib tread offers less rolling resistance and potential for longer life. The harder the compound is, the longer the tread will last. This is very simplified explanation as there are plenty other factors that go into this.

TeamAllen
05-04-2013, 01:31 PM
My experience:
Cloaked: "Hello, Kumho dealer (KD), can you get me these 857s?"

KD: No we do not have access to those tires. Anything auto we can get, but trailer tires are not available to us."

Cloaked:" Why not?"

KD: " We can't order them and they have never been available to our wholesale buyers."

Cloaked: "OK, thanks."

$0.02

.

Did you try Discount Tire? They should be able to get them.
http://dt.know-where.com/DiscountTire/cgi/selection?state-map=TN&mapid=US&lang=en&design=dt&country=US&region_name=Tennessee&region=&place=&map.x=360&map.y=170

Cloaked
05-04-2013, 03:08 PM
Did you try Discount Tire? They should be able to get them.
http://dt.know-where.com/DiscountTire/cgi/selection?state-map=TN&mapid=US&lang=en&design=dt&country=US&region_name=Tennessee&region=&place=&map.x=360&map.y=170
That is where I got mine. Then had the local dealer to mount them and balance the wheel(s).



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