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Ski-me
03-26-2013, 08:29 PM
Well, we are now the first ones of the family trying to decide on colleges for my oldest daughter.

Her stats:
Junior this year
Over 4.0 cumulative (honors classes)
Excels in everything (Math, Science, English, Art, Etc)
She loves Art but is also very strong in Math and she recognizes Engineering to be important
She finds some interest in Biomedical Engineering, but who knows
She's conservative and quiet (to a degree) but also involved in leadership within her school
She attends a Christian school right now and her believe is very important, however the school is not dependent on being Christian.

She likes the smaller schools, say 10,000 people or less.
She would like to be in warmer weather than Colorado (she's my ski buddy :()

I'd like to find a school that has a strong engineering school so that she has the ability to fine tune her degree once she is there. She would also like to minor in Art (but she does realize that an Art degree is NOT a life supporting career.....just something she enjoys)

My wife and her are on the road now, but I'd like to reach out to those that have gone through this already.

She visited Texas Christian School (TCU) yesterday and LOVED it! But the engineering is a basic/general degree with the ability to emphasize on mechanical or electrical. Not very broad in my eyes. She loves the campus too.

They are on their way to Rice University (Houston) and we'll see how that goes tomorrow.

Thursday, they fly to Nashville to look at Vanderbilt. She is excited about this school too but we'll see how it goes. I know their engineering is more reputable.

All the schools are expensive so my wife is also discussing scholarships with each school and so far, they have been favorable.

I'm looking for some more suggestions given her likes.

I guess she just doesn't want to go to Washington State University for some reason. :o

Oh well, she's a lot smarter than me!!

Thanks for any suggestions.

88 PS190
03-26-2013, 08:34 PM
Is a waterski team a qualifier?

Ski-me
03-26-2013, 08:46 PM
Is a waterski team a qualifier?

As much as both of would like that, it's not required. Her slalom is not up to that skill level..... :)

88 PS190
03-26-2013, 08:54 PM
You've apparently not seen many college waterski teams compete. Might not be her crowd, but a number of schools have pretty active clubs.

CC2MC
03-26-2013, 09:13 PM
Try Auburn University. They have about 25k students, including grad students, but it is an awesome campus and doesn't seem that big. They have an excellent engineering school as well as school of art. As a matter of fact, the two buildings are both very close to one another. There is also an Auburn ski team, although I am not sure if it is associated with the university of not. Another degree for her to consider would be Industrial Design, of which AU is one of the few schools to offer the program. It concentrates on product design, but is a pretty good mix of art and engineering.

Mgboyd25
03-26-2013, 09:20 PM
If she is going into engineering have her look at Marietta College here in Ohio.
They have an awesome petroleum engineering degree.

epnault
03-26-2013, 09:30 PM
I applaud your daughters interest in engineering. An undergraduate degree in engineering is probably one of the most respected undergraduate degrees that can prepare you for anything you plan to do in life. I have had friends get undergrad in engineering and end up going to medical school, marketing, industrial design, etc... If she is interested in working for a corporation, what I have found is that undergrads in engineering are allowed to working in any part of the company where other degreed individuals may be boxed in.

If she is artistic have her look into industrial design field of work. It is fantastic complement for individuals whom can grasp engineering while also have the skills to be artistic. These are the people that do the look of say cars or other producst. They conceptualize products with sketchs, show these sketches to focus groups to gather customer feedback, carve the product out of clay, scan and build designs in 3D, and create the surface models for tooling molds. They are responsible for dashes, ergonomics, the list goes on and on. They are responsible for FORM and engineering is FUNCTION.

Schools question. Pick the best one you can afford because it does matter. Small is good too because engineering, no matter how smart you are in HS, requires team work and strong interactions with professors. Don't get hung up on picking a major now, the first 2.5 years are indentical for all engineers. Best of luck.

Ski-me
03-26-2013, 09:41 PM
Such good stuff, thanks!

Admittedly, I am probably one of the main influenced towards the engineering but she does admit it would be a practical choice. I won't push her hard in that area but I may at least nudge her a little. It's still up to her but my wife and I will be there for guidance.

I was a Civil Engineer and have stressed to her how flexible the degree actually has become for me. I started with typical Civil stuff in Seattle (stormwater, roads, bridges, etc) but stumbled on a Natural Gas company here in Colorado. Most folk in this industry are either Mechanical or Petroleum. Well, because I had "an engineering degree" they interviewed me. They basically said, as long as I had some background in engineering, they could teach the rest. It's definitely a great position to be in.

epnault/CC2MC - Great suggestion on Industrial Design. She just heard about it a week or so ago and thought it sounded really interesting.

She's also interested in how the brain works with, say, prosthetic arms, etc.

I just want to find a place that allows here to pick once she gets there.

gweaver
03-26-2013, 10:19 PM
I don't know how you feel about CA, but one of my students graduated two years ago and is at UC Irvine in their Biomedical Engineering program. She sounds alot like your daughter- I think she graduated with a 4.3GPA and lots of extra curriculars, job shadowing and community service. She's in her second year, and already is working on some sort of internship position through the school as well as some surgery observations. She works her butt off, but she's really happy with the program.
Greg

LaRue
03-26-2013, 10:24 PM
Iowa state university has an outstanding engineering college. Our son is planning on attending there when he graduates next year

88 PS190
03-26-2013, 10:39 PM
epnault/CC2MC - Great suggestion on Industrial Design. She just heard about it a week or so ago and thought it sounded really interesting.

She's also interested in how the brain works with, say, prosthetic arms, etc.

I just want to find a place that allows here to pick once she gets there.


Prosthetic arms huh!

I work in the field of Prosthetics - what is interesting is that there are many ways to approach this.

Currently the field is in transition with Clinical Prosthetics being a Masters Degree as of 2013.

In terms of how the brain works with prosthetics there are different areas - Electrical and Biomedical engineers may work with the design of certain aspects, be it electrode or servo motors, control systems, and physical hardware. Neuro biologists/surgeons will be ont he side doing targeted muscle innervation.

Clinical Prosthetics (Certified Prosthetists - CP) evaluate/design/fit prosthetic limbs - but mostly from the standpoint of looking at a patient, determining what their needs are, and making them a limb. How much is "making" and how much is "ordering"

There's also the side of working with patients/training patients, which is occupational therapy for upper limb stuff usually.

Remember though, the % of people with upper limb amputaiton is very small, particularly since OSHA put things like guards on punch presses, and the increase in mechanized assembly, fewer folks getting limbs trapped/crushed on the job.

bbymgr
03-26-2013, 10:40 PM
Purdue has a great Engineering Program. Their Aeronautical Engineering Program has produced more NASA Astronauts than any other school.

88 PS190
03-26-2013, 10:40 PM
Iowa state university has an outstanding engineering college. Our son is planning on attending there when he graduates next year

They also have a Grrreat waterski team, as does purdue.

This is a waterski boat forum right?

Willski
03-26-2013, 10:45 PM
Iowa state was one of my possibilities, but I stuck in state and went to University of Illinois, which has an excellent reputation as an engineering school. If she wants to stay small, Illinois may not be the place though. Rose Hullman in Indiana has a good rep too, and is small. I know two grads from there that are pretty successful.

jmorone
03-26-2013, 11:08 PM
Purdue is not necessarily in a warm, southern climate and has about 30K undergrads; however, their engineering is one of the best in the nation and it is a fairly conservative school.

Ron Grover
03-26-2013, 11:23 PM
Friend of mine daughter just graduated from Embry Riddle. It is suppose to have one of the best engineering schools. She graduated with honors and is flying jets now for Air Force.

Ron Grover
03-26-2013, 11:25 PM
My daughter graduated KU with her masters in nursing. KU has a good engineering school and my daughter did ski on the KU ski team 2 years. Plus they have a fairly decent basketball team.

get_sum
03-27-2013, 12:58 AM
I'm a civil. Went to a small school. Just make sure it's an ABET accredited school. Look here for more info: http://www.usnews.com/education/best-graduate-schools/top-engineering-schools/articles/2013/03/26/engineering-school-tips-for-success-2 and here : http://grad-schools.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-graduate-schools/top-engineering-schools

wakeX2wake
03-27-2013, 09:04 AM
I'm partial to Auburn. Got my Engineering degree from there bought a MasterCraft and have survived! I like the town so much I live there now and drive 74mi one way to work. Great school, great town, great college town, great people, and seriously one of the most appealing campuses I've ever seen (yes i'm a little partial). Solid engineering/industrial design/architecture programs. I've got friends that graduated with honors in Engineering and went on to some of the top Med and Dental schools in the country. Then theres the rets of us who have gone to work and use the tool kit we got from school to work for us in the professional world. Engineering is a solid choice as it can lead in a multitude of career paths (technical sales, management, or even engineering). Also leaves you available for almost any graduate level work.

Also, AU has a club ski team that is active and when I was there they trained on a private lake with a world class instructor. If nothing else its a great way to meet people. I'm sure they're still active.

johnlanguab
03-27-2013, 09:41 AM
I would discourage Biomedical Engineering. I'm a Civil Engineer, and I have friends who were Biomedical majors. The Biomedical folks seem to go on to Law or Medical School due to the limited market for jobs.

I would probably discourage Civil too.

It seems Aerospace, Electrical, Computer, and Mechanical have the best job prospects and return on investment of time, money, and energy.

I would encourage whichever school she could get out of for the least amount of money. Mostly, I think some of the more expensive schools are not worth what they cost, unless heavily subsidized by scholarship. A Vanderbilt graduate may foster a little more clout than a regular state school, but probably not enough to warrant the additional cost of the education.

maxpower220
03-27-2013, 09:54 AM
Between now and the time she graduates, I would suspect that her interest and degree goals may change. Be prepared for that too.

College is a place to expand horizons, that doesn't always mean focus.

I guess RPI, MIT, or the service academies are out of the question.

Ski-me
03-27-2013, 10:16 AM
Between now and the time she graduates, I would suspect that her interest and degree goals may change. Be prepared for that too.

College is a place to expand horizons, that doesn't always mean focus.

I guess RPI, MIT, or the service academies are out of the question.

This is one of the reasons I want to find a place large enough that it offers multiple degrees. I certainly know my major changed a lot when I went to school and I'm sure she will learn what she likes when she start her classes.

With the Air Force Academy next door to us, I don't think she wants the military. Some of her friends are going there but she has never mentioned it as some place she was interested in.

pmkkdx
03-27-2013, 10:18 AM
Although my background is Mechanical engineering from The University of Texas and they have an awesome Engineering program with various fields of study, it does not sound like a good fit other than great engineering program in a warm climate ... loaded with liberals, it's HUGE in size and probably not the most Christian environment if living on campus. Their engineering program is top notch though. They do have a ski team that uses the private lakes at Frame Switch that has some respectable talent but also medium skill level too as I believe it is not sanctioned by UT.

Even though against my alumni, Texas A&M has an amazing engineering school with various fields to choose from. My daughter graduated from there in nutrition and my son-in-law in Ocean engineering. Even though they are not a small school, it has a small school feel as I felt my daughter had 40-50k brothers & sisters watching over her while she was there and she felt extremely safe. There is so much pride between all that attend and huge support group upon graduation (they hire their own) from all over the world. The entire area of Bryan/College Station revolves around the school and everyone seems to want to help anyone in school with housing, part time jobs, etc. There is no doubt a graduate from A&M would easily find work from an alumni. Scholarships & grants are fairly easily to be had especially with honors background and high GPA/class rank from high school.

Another choice would be Baylor as it is much smaller in size, Christian (Baptist) based and has a growing engineering school. It isnít cheap!!! My son went there for a couple of years before switching career paths & schools (he was having a bit too much fun). Waco is a medium sized town (~100k) and Baylor is a huge part of their culture. Also scholarships / grants pretty easy to come by since it is a private institution with deep pockets from their alumni.

Texas Tech would be considerably closer for trips home or for you to visit, but has quite the reputation of being a party school (what else is there to do in Lubbock?).

Where ever she does end up going, I would highly recommend her getting involved with the BSU (Baptist Student Union) even if not Baptist. They typically have various functions and good support groups/study groups to keep Christian values while away from home.

Ski-me
03-27-2013, 10:18 AM
I'm partial to Auburn. Got my Engineering degree from there bought a MasterCraft and have survived! I like the town so much I live there now and drive 74mi one way to work. Great school, great town, great college town, great people, and seriously one of the most appealing campuses I've ever seen (yes i'm a little partial). Solid engineering/industrial design/architecture programs. I've got friends that graduated with honors in Engineering and went on to some of the top Med and Dental schools in the country. Then theres the rets of us who have gone to work and use the tool kit we got from school to work for us in the professional world. Engineering is a solid choice as it can lead in a multitude of career paths (technical sales, management, or even engineering). Also leaves you available for almost any graduate level work.

Also, AU has a club ski team that is active and when I was there they trained on a private lake with a world class instructor. If nothing else its a great way to meet people. I'm sure they're still active.

I think "Somone" is partial to Auburn! :headbang:

It does look like a very large school but because of your comments that it still seems small.....I'll pass it along. Thanks!

BrooksfamX2
03-27-2013, 10:28 AM
Oregon State has a great engineering program also. Its in Corvallis Oregon, small town atmosphere.

http://oregonstate.edu/

Ski-me
03-27-2013, 10:32 AM
Although my background is Mechanical engineering from The University of Texas and they have an awesome Engineering program with various fields of study, it does not sound like a good fit other than great engineering program in a warm climate ... loaded with liberals, it's HUGE in size and probably not the most Christian environment if living on campus. Their engineering program is top notch though. They do have a ski team that uses the private lakes at Frame Switch that has some respectable talent but also medium skill level too as I believe it is not sanctioned by UT.

Even though against my alumni, Texas A&M has an amazing engineering school with various fields to choose from. My daughter graduated from there in nutrition and my son-in-law in Ocean engineering. Even though they are not a small school, it has a small school feel as I felt my daughter had 40-50k brothers & sisters watching over her while she was there and she felt extremely safe. There is so much pride between all that attend and huge support group upon graduation (they hire their own) from all over the world. The entire area of Bryan/College Station revolves around the school and everyone seems to want to help anyone in school with housing, part time jobs, etc. There is no doubt a graduate from A&M would easily find work from an alumni. Scholarships & grants are fairly easily to be had especially with honors background and high GPA/class rank from high school.

Another choice would be Baylor as it is much smaller in size, Christian (Baptist) based and has a growing engineering school. It isn’t cheap!!! My son went there for a couple of years before switching career paths & schools (he was having a bit too much fun). Waco is a medium sized town (~100k) and Baylor is a huge part of their culture. Also scholarships / grants pretty easy to come by since it is a private institution with deep pockets from their alumni.

Texas Tech would be considerably closer for trips home or for you to visit, but has quite the reputation of being a party school (what else is there to do in Lubbock?).

Where ever she does end up going, I would highly recommend her getting involved with the BSU (Baptist Student Union) even if not Baptist. They typically have various functions and good support groups/study groups to keep Christian values while away from home.

You definitley are hitting some of my concerns. She does want warm, so she has also looked around California. Obviously, we are pretty conservative and want to keep her Christian values as much as we can. I'm concerned that California (huge generalization here) is going to be more liberal and have some influence on her. I know, I can't protect her forever but again, we'll try and steer her the best we can.

I've heard her mention Baylor a few times and I know some of her friends have some interest there. I'll look into it a bit more.

Although I'm in CO, our office is out of Houston so obviously we have a lot of Texas A&M people here. It does sound Really big though. I'll at least pass it along.

Waterskiing.....her skills are not there to compete or anything but if a school had something like that, who knows. She might jump on it. I have such a good time skiing with her!

Appreciate the comments. :)

wakeX2wake
03-27-2013, 10:40 AM
I think "Somone" is partial to Auburn! :headbang:

It does look like a very large school but because of your comments that it still seems small.....I'll pass it along. Thanks!

Small town feel. Conservative campus/student body. You can get into as much or as little as you want. I often went out frequently. One of my good friends/neighbor went to a bar once while he was there.

Its a big choice. i'm glad i had my mind made up early on. good luck.

gid
03-27-2013, 10:44 AM
Ski-me
Let me know how the Vanderbilt visit goes. It is a very good school, one of the top in the Country. I would pick Vandy over the others and Nashville is a good, progressive town. Lots of water to ski on very close too :) Of course I am biased towards Nashville
Also - Nuclear Engineering seems to be a good field - East TN has several nuke places and I know a Nuke Engineer or two
Heck - everyone in my family is an engineer but me (mostly mechanical)

03 35th Anniversary
03-27-2013, 10:44 AM
Texas A&M has an excellent engineeering program.

But it is way bigger than 10,000 students.

ncsone
03-27-2013, 11:00 AM
Texas A&M has an excellent engineeering program.

But it is way bigger than 10,000 students.

I second this. Both Texas A&M and UT have very strong engineering programs but are big schools.

tideengineer
03-27-2013, 11:09 AM
I am a Civil Engineer that graduated from the University of Alabama. When I graduated, UA had about 18,000 undergrads....now it has 28,000 undergrads and 34,000 total. I am partial to University of Alabama and Auburn University just because of state pride and the respected programs. My brother went to Auburn and I just wanted something different plus I was a Tide fan. I loved UA's engineering school but I have great respect for AU's. I love the profession period...basically the ultimate problem solvers. Both schools have ski teams...the weather is nice most of the time (I hate cold weather) and the Gulf Coast is not far away!

03 35th Anniversary
03-27-2013, 11:38 AM
I am a Civil Engineer that graduated from the University of Alabama. When I graduated, UA had about 18,000 undergrads....now it has 28,000 undergrads and 34,000 total. I am partial to University of Alabama and Auburn University just because of state pride and the respected programs. My brother went to Auburn and I just wanted something different plus I was a Tide fan. I loved UA's engineering school but I have great respect for AU's. I love the profession period...basically the ultimate problem solvers. Both schools have ski teams...the weather is nice most of the time (I hate cold weather) and the Gulf Coast is not far away!

And this whole time cause of your screen name I thought you just worked for these guys...

pmkkdx
03-27-2013, 11:50 AM
I second this. Both Texas A&M and UT have very strong engineering programs but are big schools.

yep, both (UT & A&M) very large universities ... but A&M doesn't have the feel of being that large (except on home game weekends during football season). They are HUGE on tradition, very friendly, well mannered and very safe environment.

Baylor is really growing in many areas including academics in the engineering field.

My daughter had always wanted to go to Baylor and was accepted there ... but she visited A&M and immediately fell in love with it.

ski_king
03-27-2013, 12:28 PM
What about the Air Force Academy?
It is right in your back yard and it sounds like she has the grades to get in. However it is more of who you know to get in to one of the military academys.

Ski-me
03-27-2013, 12:50 PM
What about the Air Force Academy?
It is right in your back yard and it sounds like she has the grades to get in. However it is more of who you know to get in to one of the military academys.

Yea, I think she definitely has the grades but it really is "literally in our backyard". Our neighborhood backs up directly to the Air Force Academy property. She want's to get out of town a little bit to experience a different part of the US and I don't blame her.

JohnE
03-27-2013, 12:55 PM
I got my BSEE from WPI. http://www.wpi.edu/ Not much of a warm climate. Good school though.

ski_king
03-27-2013, 01:10 PM
Grove City College in Grove City, PA is a small Christian college that puts out good engineers. However I believe thay are limited to Mechanical and Electrical. I have several friends who went there and they all had good job offers before graduation.

mwg
03-27-2013, 01:17 PM
I'm a Mechanical Engineer who graduated from LSU.. I also work for LSU in Operations & Maintenance. LSU has always had a decent engineering school but it has really taken off in the last 10 years or so with the addition of laboratories/design space and renovated classroom space. Tuition, even for out of state kids the school is a bargain. LSU has an active student ski/wakeboard club and we are able to ski 9-10 months a year. And if you love college football... it's hard to beat the Tiger Stadium experience.

TRBenj
03-27-2013, 01:18 PM
Im more familiar with northeast engineering schools which are definitely not a warm climate, so I dont have much to add there.

Just wanted to comment on a few things people have said.

1. Biomed has a very strong job market in certain regions (like metro Boston). Its even bigger than defense there, with lots of opportunities.

2. Most of the better engineering schools will start steering your class choices in support of a chosen engineering discipline as early as 2nd semester freshman year. By sophomore year, the paths are definitely different... so I would not expect to be able to remain undecided for the first 2.5 years of school. Anything after year 1, you'll be playing catch up.

Agree with several who have said that an engineering degree will be very versatile- that has been my experience as well. Ive worked for several technology/defense companies that primarily hire engineers, and from there, can be transferred and promoted into pretty much any other role within the company- all the way up to President/CEO. Gaining an engineering degree does not usually turn you into an engineer on day one of your career... but it gives you a solid technical foundation and prepares you with the skills and thought processes that can make you successful as an engineer... or other fields of work if you choose to go in a different direction professionally. Gaining an engineering degree means that you were smart and resourceful enough to survive engineering school- which says a lot.

CruisinGA
03-27-2013, 04:15 PM
I am a Mech. Engineering grad from Georgia Tech. Both my sisters went to Vanderbilt.

Vanderbilt is a very nice school. It is not the place to be as a serious engineer. I knew several folks who left Vandy and came to GT to get their engineering degrees.

School is about increasing your earning potential. See link below, GT was just ranked #1 in ROI, IMO an under-appreciated college stat.

http://graphics.wsj.com/college-costs/#i%5B%5D=id115409&i%5B%5D=id196291&i%5B%5D=id234076&i%5B%5D=id126775&i%5B%5D=id139755&f=roi&d=all,All

mbeach
03-27-2013, 04:28 PM
my 2-cents is as follows: i am a retired computer jock so i lean towards the information side of things. as everyone knows, we are in the information age and the demands for getting information timely from one place to the other will only increase. your daughter obviously is very bright and assuming she keeps up her gpa and does well on the act/sat, i would look for a full 5-yr free ride. good colleges an't cheap!! that said, you may want to look at the following review by us news and world of the best undergraduate engineering programs. http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/rankings/engineering. enjoy this stage of her life and guide her without pushing.

CruisinGA
03-27-2013, 04:32 PM
I would discourage Biomedical Engineering. I'm a Civil Engineer, and I have friends who were Biomedical majors. The Biomedical folks seem to go on to Law or Medical School due to the limited market for jobs.

I would probably discourage Civil too.

It seems Aerospace, Electrical, Computer, and Mechanical have the best job prospects and return on investment of time, money, and energy.

I would encourage whichever school she could get out of for the least amount of money. Mostly, I think some of the more expensive schools are not worth what they cost, unless heavily subsidized by scholarship. A Vanderbilt graduate may foster a little more clout than a regular state school, but probably not enough to warrant the additional cost of the education.


I would agree with all of the above.

I had several Biomed friends, and only those at the very top of their class had job prospects in their field.

Industrial Engineering is very big at Ga Tech (#1 ISYE school in the nation), and has by far the most girls of all the engineering degrees. I always joke that it is "imaginary engineering" but at Tech it is often viewed by employers as "business people that can do math and think analytically"
Many of the big consulting companies (Bain, Deloitte etc etc) hire out of this major.

Ski-me
03-27-2013, 04:47 PM
my 2-cents is as follows: i am a retired computer jock so i lean towards the information side of things. as everyone knows, we are in the information age and the demands for getting information timely from one place to the other will only increase. your daughter obviously is very bright and assuming she keeps up her gpa and does well on the act/sat, i would look for a full 5-yr free ride. good colleges an't cheap!! that said, you may want to look at the following review by us news and world of the best undergraduate engineering programs. http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/rankings/engineering. enjoy this stage of her life and guide her without pushing.

that's a good link, thanks! These things are definitely "not cheap"!!! However, her grandfather has set aside a little to help with the tuition......very thankful! :)

Ski-me
03-27-2013, 04:53 PM
I would agree with all of the above.

I had several Biomed friends, and only those at the very top of their class had job prospects in their field.

Industrial Engineering is very big at Ga Tech (#1 ISYE school in the nation), and has by far the most girls of all the engineering degrees. I always joke that it is "imaginary engineering" but at Tech it is often viewed by employers as "business people that can do math and think analytically"
Many of the big consulting companies (Bain, Deloitte etc etc) hire out of this major.

I appreciate the feedback on the Biomed stuff. I hate it when a person goes to school, gets a degree, and then later finds out it's impossible to secure a decent job. This does help with her decision process.

My wife's brother got his masters at GA Tech so it's slightly on the radar. She does want to keep Art on the radar too. I think just something else to learn while she's there.

CruisinGA
03-27-2013, 05:05 PM
I think someone else mentioned Industrial Design... another good program at Ga Tech.

Great for people who are artistic, but are grounded in reality. :D

pmkkdx
03-27-2013, 05:16 PM
The basic engineering fields for undergrad get the most opportunities, like Mechanical & Electrical based on her aptitude. And unless she is a diehard technical type, she will likely move on to other fields like engineering or program management in future years if she is more into being a people type person. Even these basic fields can have specialty areas of focus and great stepping stones into graduate levels. I also tend to agree that any of the basic fields from any competent engineering school will likely get 90% opportunities but if she is in the extremely high-end percentile, the higher end schools diploma would have move weight for the higher end type jobs. Example, someone in the top 10% coming out of MIT in any of their fields can pretty much name their job opportunity and location. Scholarships and grants help drastically offload the financial end and can be had with a bit of work by the student & parents.

Sodar
03-27-2013, 05:18 PM
If I can speak for a moment...

It sounds like you are leading her on her career path. There are a lot of "I told her" and "she knows" in your opening post. Remember though that this is just as much her decision as it is yours. There are TONS of students who walk into their freshman year thinking they are going one direction, but do a 180 degree turn and end up going another. Don't discount the art thing. Have her look into architecture, graphic design, marketing and plethora of other avenues that use analytical skills, but also have an artsy and creative side to them. You obviously know your kid way better than any of us, but just keep your mind open and available to new opportunities. I know a few close friends that followed their parents' path, only to be miserable in their career after only 5 years post grad.

Edit: Looks like my perspective is not unique. Keep your mind open and let her follow the path she desires.

pmkkdx
03-27-2013, 05:37 PM
great points Sodar!!!

My son didn't have a clue but swore he could not work in an engineering office environment like I did ... he opted to try general business (Baylor) for a couple of years before miserably failing (would help to do class & homework too :rolleyes:) before I forced him to come home and figure out what he really wanted to do (instead of piling up student loans). After a little time, he decided engineering wasn't all that bad plus he was quite strong in math & very strong mechanical knack/perspective ...fast forward 3 years ... he now has a nice job working as a mechanical design engineer with a systems engineering firm and is truly acceling while enjoying his work. My daughter on the otherhand knew exactly what career she wanted from about her Junior year in HS.

JimN
03-27-2013, 05:43 PM
I appreciate the feedback on the Biomed stuff. I hate it when a person goes to school, gets a degree, and then later finds out it's impossible to secure a decent job. This does help with her decision process.

My wife's brother got his masters at GA Tech so it's slightly on the radar. She does want to keep Art on the radar too. I think just something else to learn while she's there.

Has she talked with a good guidance adviser about looking forward WRT career goals? If she wants to be an engineer, she should talk to other women in architecture, engineering & bio-med because men don't have the same perspective, by any stretch of the imagination. If she's very interested in the artistic aspect, industrial/architectural design could be a great base for what she's really interested in and if she has a knack for designing furniture and a "whole experience" view of architecture/design, she'll have a wider palette to work with.

Here's an example of a local designer who also rehabs homes- if needed, she designs everything for the project, including modifications to the structure.

http://www.modernedgedesign.com/

Someone who also has the mechanical engineering background may have a leg up on the competition, but at most schools, that will require a double major. At a place like Milwaukee School Of Engineering, they offer an Architectural Engineering program, as well as Building Construction, Civil Engineering, BioMed, robotics, EE, Communications engineering, etc. IIRC, they were one of the first schools to get a rapid prototype machine.

If she decides to get into large projects like power plants, hydroelectric dams, airports, military installations, environmental engineering and the like, I have a friend who's a Sr Project Architect at a very large firm that has offices all over the US and in other countries- they're always looking for the best and brightest and the company is employee-owned. They do have an office in Colorado.

Ski-me
03-27-2013, 06:25 PM
If I can speak for a moment...

It sounds like you are leading her on her career path. There are a lot of "I told her" and "she knows" in your opening post. Remember though that this is just as much her decision as it is yours. There are TONS of students who walk into their freshman year thinking they are going one direction, but do a 180 degree turn and end up going another. Don't discount the art thing. Have her look into architecture, graphic design, marketing and plethora of other avenues that use analytical skills, but also have an artsy and creative side to them. You obviously know your kid way better than any of us, but just keep your mind open and available to new opportunities. I know a few close friends that followed their parents' path, only to be miserable in their career after only 5 years post grad.

Edit: Looks like my perspective is not unique. Keep your mind open and let her follow the path she desires.

I definitely know what you mean! I was also pushed by my parents that always said I should be an engineer. Well, once I got to college I just did what they suggested and became an engineer. But it was hard initially. I originally started as Civil, then Mechanical, then Construction Management, and then finally back to Civil.

Being aware of this, I am trying to let her decide on her career path. I've suggested Engineering of some sort (simply because of her strong math and science ability) but also told her to be open to other areas. That's where the Art comes in. We've just stumbled on the Industrial Design/Engineering within the past few weeks and it does sound interesting for her. We are trying to help guide her the best we can without pushing her too hard in any direction. She's a good kid.

JimN - I did ask her about the school career councelors and she basically said they weren't much help. Perhaps an outside source would be good.

88 PS190
03-27-2013, 07:51 PM
Grove City College in Grove City, PA is a small Christian college that puts out good engineers. However I believe thay are limited to Mechanical and Electrical. I have several friends who went there and they all had good job offers before graduation.


And some people waterski on lake latonka!

I've seen grove city a few times.

Jerseydave
03-27-2013, 08:09 PM
I didn't read the whole thread, but I've noticed PSU (Penn State U.) now has an engineering campus in Philadelphia (a suburb of Philly actually) and they have a lot of scholarship $$.
Might be worth a look.

Best of luck to her, and if she needs a nice guy to date my son (19) is available! :D
He currently attends Towson U. in MD.

Shooter McKevin
03-27-2013, 08:10 PM
I hate it when a person goes to school, gets a degree, and then later finds out it's impossible to secure a decent job. That was me!

Top of my high school class. Thought I wanted to be a doctor. Didn't know how to self motivate when I got to University so I didn't make the cut for med school. Graduated with a Bachelor of Science (molecular biology), and figured I'd work in biotechnology (supposedly booming at the time). I've never worked a day as a biologist. 10 years as a construction estimator and project manager and I have had no doubt from day 1 that I should have been a Civil Engineer (which is why I find this thread so interesting).

I agree with everything Sodar said, but in my case it was the opposite. My parents trusted me to make all of my own decisions from a very young age. Looking back, there are times I wish they were more involved in my decision making. I could have used some constructive input from someone who knew me, instead of from guidance counselors who knew nothing about me.

Ironically, my Dad is also a project manager. As a kid I knew nothing about what he did, he never talked about it... EVER. Now his office is 1/4 mile from mine. We're in different fields but our paths cross now and then.

Ski-me
03-27-2013, 08:44 PM
That was me!

Top of my high school class. Thought I wanted to be a doctor. Didn't know how to self motivate when I got to University so I didn't make the cut for med school. Graduated with a Bachelor of Science (molecular biology), and figured I'd work in biotechnology (supposedly booming at the time). I've never worked a day as a biologist. 10 years as a construction estimator and project manager and I have had no doubt from day 1 that I should have been a Civil Engineer (which is why I find this thread so interesting).

I agree with everything Sodar said, but in my case it was the opposite. My parents trusted me to make all of my own decisions from a very young age. Looking back, there are times I wish they were more involved in my decision making. I could have used some constructive input from someone who knew me, instead of from guidance counselors who knew nothing about me.

Ironically, my Dad is also a project manager. As a kid I knew nothing about what he did, he never talked about it... EVER. Now his office is 1/4 mile from mine. We're in different fields but our paths cross now and then.

I guess, in a way you and I are similar. I was born in Calgary but left at the age of 2. I got my degree in Civil engineering and am now an estimator for a natural gas company. And I've also done some project management as well (just didn't want to travel and be away from home all the time). :cool:

Anyways, they visited Rice University today and really didn't like it very much. They said people didn't look happy, the most excitement their guide could tell them about was a 3 day event and it just seemed all in all, more academic than anything. Compared to TCU with all kinds of school activities and "school spirit" if you will. Rice just kinda seemed boring to them.

However, they are greatful for the experience because it is educating them more and more what to look for when they visit each campus.

Off to Vanderbilt tomorrow and they are hopeful.

bcd
03-27-2013, 10:50 PM
If you're concerned about price, rule out private. Also, she's going to get hit with out of state tuition costs to go somewhere warmer. I'd suggest Colorado School of Mines or Colorado State if you re-consider in state. Otherwise, you can see about getting her residency changed after the first year of school to get in state rates, but I'm not sure what each state's rules are.

You should be able to find some engineering organizations (SME, Society of Women Engineers, etc), companies, or universities that have learn about engineering workshops that can give her more information about engineering.

Once in school, whether engineering or not, she should try for getting summer internships. They pay better than fast food, give great experience on the resume, and give her insight into what her future career could be.

02ProstarSammyD
03-28-2013, 11:28 AM
10 years as a construction estimator

haha thats a great story. I went to school for industrial technology. Worked in electrical during the day to pay for college. 10 years later estimating large projects. Its not about what the paper says its what makes you happy.

jdl xstar
03-28-2013, 12:03 PM
If you're concerned about price, rule out private. Also, she's going to get hit with out of state tuition costs to go somewhere warmer. I'd suggest Colorado School of Mines or Colorado State if you re-consider in state. Otherwise, you can see about getting her residency changed after the first year of school to get in state rates, but I'm not sure what each state's rules are.

You should be able to find some engineering organizations (SME, Society of Women Engineers, etc), companies, or universities that have learn about engineering workshops that can give her more information about engineering.

Once in school, whether engineering or not, she should try for getting summer internships. They pay better than fast food, give great experience on the resume, and give her insight into what her future career could be.

A lot of people are suggesting out of state public schools which can be just as much as prvate tuition therefore if you are ok with that price range, i would go the private route- otherwise just stay in state and reep the tuition benefit.

Based on your criteria.. < 10k students; warmer climate; great engineering school; not too too far from home... I would suggest SMU in Dallas. Plus SMU has lots of students from CO (and everywhere for that matter) so she wouldn't be an "outsider" like she would if she went to a state school that has 90% of student body being from that particular state. Plus SMU has D1 sports which is part of the college experience IMHO. SMU is just on the outskirts of Dallas so you have the benefits of a major city without being IN the city. Vandy or Wake Forest is another option. SMU has soem really good scholarships so if you can get a chunk of the appr 40k annual tuition paid for, you've got a great deal.

jdl xstar
03-28-2013, 12:11 PM
BTW if she liked TCU, then she would absolutely love SMU... Campus of SMU is far and away better and location is too. Actually no comparison in most ways. Fort Worth vs Dallas... Horned Purple Toad vs Mustang...

You should visit SMU with her and spend time in that Highland Park area and you will know what i mean...

Ski-me
03-28-2013, 12:22 PM
BTW if she liked TCU, then she would absolutely love SMU... Campus of SMU is far and away better and location is too. Actually no comparison in most ways. Fort Worth vs Dallas... Horned Purple Toad vs Mustang...

You should visit SMU with her and spend time in that Highland Park area and you will know what i mean...

Cool, thank you. I'll look at the SMU school as well.

Price wise, they are amazing how expensive they really are. But when you look at private schools vs. out of state tuition, they are closer to each other (generally speaking). With "some" scholarship, that's going to definitely help. We'll see how much as we get closer.....

03 35th Anniversary
03-28-2013, 12:38 PM
BTW if she liked TCU, then she would absolutely love SMU... Campus of SMU is far and away better and location is too. Actually no comparison in most ways. Fort Worth vs Dallas... Horned Purple Toad vs Mustang...

You should visit SMU with her and spend time in that Highland Park area and you will know what i mean...

X2, it is a very nice area...

ctjahn
03-28-2013, 06:37 PM
Milwaukee School of Engineering.

88% drop out rate, but still a very high employment rate. Yea, its rough (although easier over the years in comparison to when I went.)... But; top notch education and no fluff.

First degree: Electrical Engineering 40 started but only 4 grads... Second degree Network Management Systems (easier -75%).

I had people banging down my door from across the country. Didnt even look for a job; they found me and that was during a bad economy.

Expensive. Yes. Worth it? I guess so but burned me out so much I dont even want to pursue a masters or further education. (although I took a lot more credits than the average person, worked part time, and got out in 5 years)

cj

The Youngster
03-28-2013, 07:26 PM
Auburn University!!!

I am currently a senior at Auburn graduating in just a few weeks in Chemical Engineering. I could not recommend a better place. Yes there are many students, but as many have said it does not feel like a big school. The city of Auburn is a great place to live and go to college. As for the dual interest in multiple fields Auburn is a great place to be; I did the very similar thing as an entering freshman. I wanted to go to med school so I majored in ChemE with a specialization in Biomedical engineering. However, now I am moving to Houston to work in the energy sector. Auburn offers many opportunities to minor/specialize in connected fields. Auburn's engineering school is ABET accredited and is ranked very highly against both public and private schools. The best way to know if she will like any campus is to stay there, specifically with someone who is a student and experience the campus as a student does for a day.

Just my two cents. Good luck to "you" and her. And yes Auburn does have a ski team and a TT (maybe an '07) boat on a private lake 30 min from campus. It is a club sport, but they still have many benefits.

2RLAKE
03-28-2013, 09:50 PM
of course the best of the best go to the University of Cincinnati, Mechanical Engineering!!!

Seriously, as someone who has a few hundred employees at work, basically 98% engineering undergrads, but all of us in commercial roles, it really doesn't matter where you go its how you apply yourself. Your undergrad degree opens doors then its all about what you do with that degree

So I just went to the local U of Cincy ... have people who work for me who have gone to Notre Dame, Harvard, West Point, etc .... its all about how they apply themselves afterwards

88 PS190
03-28-2013, 10:04 PM
Cinci also has a waterski team.

2RLAKE
03-28-2013, 10:12 PM
Cinci also has a waterski team.

not only does it have a waterski team ... it has a MC TT!

tideengineer
03-29-2013, 01:05 PM
And this whole time cause of your screen name I thought you just worked for these guys...

:) oh come one now...

gid
03-29-2013, 01:12 PM
How was the Vanderbilt visit? :popcorn:

Ski-me
03-29-2013, 01:22 PM
Haven't heard yet. There probably there now..... :)

gid
03-29-2013, 01:24 PM
Haven't heard yet. There probably there now..... :)

Yesterday was nice and sunny, today rain. Hate that for your family.

Ben
03-29-2013, 01:52 PM
it really doesn't matter where you go its how you apply yourself. Your undergrad degree opens doors then its all about what you do with that degree

X2.
It is the person and how they apply and interpret what they know and are taught to understand and solve problems and situations.
There are plenty of "book engineers" from good schools that would not know which screwdriver to pick up....

GoneBoatN
03-30-2013, 01:46 PM
A school that a son of a friend of mine went to that I did not hear of before:

Rose Hulman

Welcome to Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, home to 2,100 undergraduate and 100 graduate students majoring in engineering, science or mathematics. As we prepare students for their careers, our emphasis is on a hands-on education where students learn the value of teamwork as well as formulas and equations.

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
5500 Wabash Avenue
Terre Haute, IN 47803

Rose-Hulman leads the nation in undergraduate science, engineering and math education. We offer bachelor's and master's degrees, with nearly 100% placement.

http://www.rose-hulman.edu/

may be worth looking into.

Ski-me
03-31-2013, 11:18 AM
Well, they just got back from their trip and I finally got to hear about Vanderbilt. As said, it was rainy so that kinda put a damper on things. Let's just say their guide was "less than enthusiastic" about touring and was a senior finishing up her last semester there. As compared to the other two school guides that had freshman as their guides. They certainly noticed the excitement of the earlier two compared to the Vanderbilt guide. So, that being said, they didn't get a lot of personal thoughts with the Vanderbilt guide.

Afterwards, they decided to just start talking to people and I think this is where their impression improved. They visited the engineering and art departments and were very impressed! Had some good discussions as well. The campus was very beautiful in spite of the rain.

Overall, they left really liking the school but I do think that TCU felt the best out of all 3. However, in fairness, Vanderbilt is still worth a second look (from what they told me). I just think the poor guide really threw them. Looking past that though, they were really impressed with the school.

They also learned that there is a 24 hour student visit which would be a great experience to find out "truly" how students interact on a day to day schedule. We may look into this in the future.

Appreciate everyone's help through this process. I'm glad she is still just a Junior! That gives us a little extra time!

texasjet
03-31-2013, 01:56 PM
Seems there are lots of Auburn fans and feedback -- War Dam Eagle !! While I didn't go to school at Auburn I have a close friend and family that did and also some nieces & nephews that are recent grads. So from attending football games I can definitely support that it is a terrific college environment and college town. Beautiful campus and nice folks. One of my nephews was also a Chemical Engineer undergrad and grad school and had a great experience and his father was an Auburn grad in Mechanical Engineering, so the engineering school is quite good.

Now, all that said about Auburn, I am an Oklahoma State grad (undergrad Management Science/Computer Systems and MBA). OSU is in Stillwater, OK and like Auburn it is also an A&M land grant college. And if you took an Auburn person and plopped them down on the OSU campus they might initially think they are at Auburn as the campuses have a very similar look and feel. OSU also has a very strong engineering school, particularly industrial and mechanical. Stillwater is also a terrific college town. About 75,000 population with about 20k+ of that being student and college related.

One thing that I see that is important is to decide if your daughter enjoys the college town atmosphere, or a college in a larger city (e.g. TCU in Ft Worth, or Vandy in Nashville) -- this is big difference in the college experience. Also if she has an interest in being in a sorority -- while the greek life is very different from school to school, in many instances it can be a very positive experience for kids to quickly integrate and be very active and surrounded by other like minded students (IMO and experience).

Also, sounds like you are looking at many private schools and your daughter has terrific grades -- one thing that you might be sure to ask and understand with any state/public schools is if they will waive out of state tuition for great students like your daughter. I know for sure that OSU has taken this approach given the Texas "top 10% of high school graduating class approach". OSU has found they can attract the cream of crop of student by waiving the out of state tuition criteria.

Good luck with all the visits. Your blessed to have a great student with such opportunities ahead of her. Congrats !

JLowder
03-31-2013, 03:11 PM
You should take a hard look at Cal Poly SLO. College town, with 15 minutes from the beach. Within 1 hour of fresh water for skiing. From an education standpoint, it is the premier college in CA for mechanical engineering degrees as well as architectural. Close enough to LA to fly home every now and then too. While I didn't go there, I have interviewed and hired many engineers out of there.

MIskier
03-31-2013, 04:55 PM
On the small school front with good engineering school w/ a good Christian roots Baylor will be hard to beat, a very close friend went there and had excellent job opportunities straight out of school, but as others have said it is pricey.

The campus is gorgeous and everyone that I met while visiting her was extremely nice...they also have a small water ski team.

Rose Hulman and Case Western Reserve are both small schools with some of the top engineering programs in the country, know two sisters one who is at Hulman and the other is just graduating from case both were top 10% of class and had amazing job prospects coming out of school. Again neither school is cheap.

If she is looking for a warmer climate, good education and you're wanting to try and keep costs down some of the schools in Louisiana would be worth a look LA has some of the lowest tuition in the country and some good engineering programs such as University of Louisiana Lafayette, LA Tech, and even the school I attended the University of New Orleans all have strong engineering programs.

If she decides that she wants a degree and job that will allow her to explore her artistic side Industrial design, architecture, and Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering would all give her that opportunity if she finds the right employer.

Several of the top industrial design schools in the country are located in Georgia, being Georgia Tech, and Savanna College of Art and Design. MasterCraft employs a Savanna grad...

Shameless plug for my own major...Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering was rated the best college degree to have in 2012 based on starting salary, benefits, and unemployment.

ctjahn
04-01-2013, 10:57 AM
x2. I looked into Rose Hulman quite a bit.

I had 50% swimming scholarships to 5-6 schools. Went to MSOE for the financial aid, and 20% academnic scholarship (knew I couldnt swim, work, and go to school full time)

cj

A school that a son of a friend of mine went to that I did not hear of before:

Rose Hulman

Welcome to Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology, home to 2,100 undergraduate and 100 graduate students majoring in engineering, science or mathematics. As we prepare students for their careers, our emphasis is on a hands-on education where students learn the value of teamwork as well as formulas and equations.

Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology
5500 Wabash Avenue
Terre Haute, IN 47803

Rose-Hulman leads the nation in undergraduate science, engineering and math education. We offer bachelor's and master's degrees, with nearly 100% placement.

http://www.rose-hulman.edu/

may be worth looking into.

swatguy
04-02-2013, 02:10 AM
I know you said warmer climates but these are some of the better smaller engineering schools.
So my career I opted for has nothing to do with my Civil Engineering Degree. Long story how that all came into to play , but I don't regret anything.

How about

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy NY

Rochester Institute Technology Rochester NY

But in all seriousness the Air Force Academy would be awesome in my eyes and as mentioned right in your back door.

Panda Cub
04-09-2013, 12:05 AM
U of I is a top notch engineering school. Number 4 in the nation.

epnault
04-09-2013, 11:11 AM
Ski Me,
Have a look at this article. I just wrote a check, the final one hooray for me, a couple weeks ago for $15K to pay off my student loans and I was *****ing to my father about the cost of college education and there is no way my kids are doing engineering etc.. and he sent me this article. I felt better.
Eric

http://www.forbes.com/sites/jennagoudreau/2012/05/15/best-top-most-valuable-college-majors-degrees/

Ski-me
04-09-2013, 11:42 AM
Eric, great article and I'd definitely agree! Engineering, of some sort, can help a person secure a job significantly. And the pay is decent enough to support your family. Thanks!

mzimme
04-09-2013, 12:02 PM
My daughter graduated KU with her masters in nursing. KU has a good engineering school and my daughter did ski on the KU ski team 2 years. Plus they have a fairly decent basketball team.

I'm with this guy. Rock Chalk. ;)

psychobilly
04-09-2013, 12:19 PM
I will have to stand up for A&M. Others have already mentioned how strong they are in engineering. I work in the Oil & Gas industry and there is a LOT of recruiting coming out of A&M in the O&G industry. There's one thing for sure, even if our leader runs us in the ground, there will still be a need for O&G. My boat has got to have it!!!!

Ski-me
02-25-2014, 01:33 PM
Small update....

She's been accepted to Texas A&M College of Engineering. Because of her grades, she was offered in-state tuition and a Presidential Scholarship (about half of total tuition) :dance:

Accepted to Auburn University, also offered Presidential Scholarship (about half of tuition).

Accepted to Purdue University but too late for any Scholarships... :(

Waiting on Vanderbilt, School of Mines and Georgia Tech.

So nice to have options!! :D And it goes without saying, I'm so proud of her hard work!!

epnault
02-25-2014, 01:38 PM
Very cool. Congrats.

Maristar210
02-25-2014, 01:56 PM
Don't forget Rice. My wife went to Vanderbilt. She couldn't decide between Vanderbilt and Rice. After two years she transferred.......

2RLAKE
02-25-2014, 02:08 PM
Small update....

She's been accepted to Texas A&M College of Engineering. Because of her grades, she was offered in-state tuition and a Presidential Scholarship (about half of total tuition) :dance:

Accepted to Auburn University, also offered Presidential Scholarship (about half of tuition).

Accepted to Purdue University but too late for any Scholarships... :(

Waiting on Vanderbilt, School of Mines and Georgia Tech.

So nice to have options!! :D And it goes without saying, I'm so proud of her hard work!!

Terrific ... Huge congrats from a fellow engineer!

thatsmrmastercraft
02-25-2014, 02:10 PM
Small update....

She's been accepted to Texas A&M College of Engineering. Because of her grades, she was offered in-state tuition and a Presidential Scholarship (about half of total tuition) :dance:

Accepted to Auburn University, also offered Presidential Scholarship (about half of tuition).

Accepted to Purdue University but too late for any Scholarships... :(

Waiting on Vanderbilt, School of Mines and Georgia Tech.

So nice to have options!! :D And it goes without saying, I'm so proud of her hard work!!

Congrats! Yet one more reason to be proud.

TresRiver205
02-25-2014, 02:15 PM
Congratulations to you all. They all sound like great choices. As an Aggie Electrical Engineer I'm biased to A&M. I feel they really prepared me to go out and get to work as an engineer. The engineering dept is very large and that gives you a lot of opportunity to specialize within your discipline. If the department is too small you may not have the opportunity to take Engineering electives that help shape your personal direction within your discipline.

It's a big school but it has a smaller feel since it is generally a walking campus. I feel that my degree has always always garnered respect. At least no one has ever accused me of going to a "Party" school.:twocents:

Ski-me
02-25-2014, 03:33 PM
Congratulations to you all. They all sound like great choices. As an Aggie Electrical Engineer I'm biased to A&M. I feel they really prepared me to go out and get to work as an engineer. The engineering dept is very large and that gives you a lot of opportunity to specialize within your discipline. If the department is too small you may not have the opportunity to take Engineering electives that help shape your personal direction within your discipline.

It's a big school but it has a smaller feel since it is generally a walking campus. I feel that my degree has always always garnered respect. At least no one has ever accused me of going to a "Party" school.:twocents:

This is a common theme I keep hearing about A&M. Large but feels small. Engineering big enough that she has options (which is definitely what she needs). I'm hoping once she is in and studying some of the core classes, she'll start to find an interest.

We'll be visiting some of the campuses over spring break so hopefully that will help narrow it down.

Ski-me
02-25-2014, 03:35 PM
Don't forget Rice. My wife went to Vanderbilt. She couldn't decide between Vanderbilt and Rice. After two years she transferred.......

They did visit Rice during their first trip and decided against it after the tour. I guess it just didn't click for them. TCU was the opposite....they loved it and Fort Worth, but not large enough engineering so I said it wasn't worth the money. :o

Aric'sX15
02-25-2014, 04:15 PM
Texas has a lot of great schools, so any place she chooses in Texas is the right choice (I go to UNT, which also has a great engineering program, but has been labeled a sh*thole by some on here) Despite the grievances I have with the cult factor of A&M, it's a great school. I have a friend doing petro engineering and he already has an internship making 30+ dollars an hour!!!! Don't leave out University of Texas, the Cockrell school of engineering there is one of the best in the country! She can't go wrong, seems like she's extremely smart! Good luck to whatever decision she makes, Texas is a great place to go to school!

pmkkdx
02-25-2014, 07:12 PM
congrats! and best wishes to her! Engineering is a great educational path and career choice!

bhanson
02-26-2014, 02:23 PM
Hey Ski-Me,

I live in Denver, have two thru college, and one about to start. I went to Texas A&M for Civil Engr BS and Mech Engr MS and it has been the foundation my professional and personal success. Loved it, love it still, certainly not sub-10K students but you might find that it feels like a smaller school since in a small college town. Wife went to CU, very good engineering education, in-state tuition, but both cold and large so doesn't fit your bill. One thought: my son is about to start engineering school at Ft Lewis in Durango. Small school, general engineering degree is perfect foundation for specialization in Masters program, very affordable, and Durango's cool-factor is simply ridiculous.

TRBenj
02-27-2014, 09:40 AM
Congrats to her (and you!), its great to see hard work rewarded.

Accepted to Purdue University but too late for any Scholarships... :(
If Purdue is on her short list of schools that she'd like to attend, dont rule them out just yet. I would not hesitate to call or visit the Admissions/Financial Aid office and ask them if there is anything that could be done. Let them know that you have generous offers from other competitive schools. My parents did this at one school I was looking at, and by the time we got home from our campus visit that night, there was a message on our answering machine improving their scholarship package by $10k/yr. So it never hurts to ask! Remember that they can package the money in a number of different ways- calling it a scholarship, grant, financial aid or tuition forgiveness... but its all effectively the same thing. Schools can and do improve offers to attract desirable students.

Roman
02-27-2014, 10:10 AM
Awesome! Congratulations!
I hope my kids will follow a similar path one day.

Im a Mechanical/Automotive Engineer. Engineering is a great path that opens many doors in life for career choices, and I think in life aswell.

Cant really go wrong with any discipline. Make sure she takes some electrical courses though would be my recomendation. I have a heavy mechanical base, but I find I could use some electrical knowledge for what I do and have done (control theory, some more matlab, c++, and more advanced electronics knowledge). Everythign these days is tied to electronics. If you want to excel, it helps alot to have a solid foundation in it.

Best of luck.

ERTW!!!

Ski-me
02-27-2014, 12:39 PM
Congrats to her (and you!), its great to see hard work rewarded.

If Purdue is on her short list of schools that she'd like to attend, dont rule them out just yet. I would not hesitate to call or visit the Admissions/Financial Aid office and ask them if there is anything that could be done. Let them know that you have generous offers from other competitive schools. My parents did this at one school I was looking at, and by the time we got home from our campus visit that night, there was a message on our answering machine improving their scholarship package by $10k/yr. So it never hurts to ask! Remember that they can package the money in a number of different ways- calling it a scholarship, grant, financial aid or tuition forgiveness... but its all effectively the same thing. Schools can and do improve offers to attract desirable students.

Very interesting, thanks! My wife did call because the deadline was Feb 1, but as we read it, it said "accepted students could apply" and she had not been "accepted" yet. And they said it was too late for any scholarship considerations. But good to know it has worked in the past and I'm sure my daughter will be happy.

Appreciate the heads-up!

Ski-me
03-27-2014, 07:27 PM
We took off for spring break to look at Texas A&M, Georgia Tech and Auburn.

Loved A&M, felt like GT was too much wedged into Atlanta and really like Auburn too.

Final decision though....Texas A&M!

So delighted and she is much closer to Colorado than the other two. Strangely, A&M, Auburn and WSU (wash state) are all larger schools in very small towns. We all felt more comfortable in that environment.

So proud of her!

Thank you all for the help and advice!

2RLAKE
03-27-2014, 07:51 PM
Congrats ... Wish her all the best ... I'll be going through this in two years with my son

Blmeanie
03-27-2014, 07:58 PM
I am a Mech. Engineering grad from Georgia Tech. Both my sisters went to Vanderbilt.

Vanderbilt is a very nice school. It is not the place to be as a serious engineer. I knew several folks who left Vandy and came to GT to get their engineering degrees.

School is about increasing your earning potential. See link below, GT was just ranked #1 in ROI, IMO an under-appreciated college stat.

http://graphics.wsj.com/college-costs/#i%5B%5D=id115409&i%5B%5D=id196291&i%5B%5D=id234076&i%5B%5D=id126775&i%5B%5D=id139755&f=roi&d=all,All

Ga tech is a great school and great campus right in midtown atlanta.

pmkkdx
03-31-2014, 10:07 AM
you or she won't be disappointed with Texas A&M. Great school with a HUGE worldwide network for job placement upon graduation.

Ski-me
03-31-2014, 11:02 AM
Ga tech is a great school and great campus right in midtown atlanta.

We were impressed with GT. I don't think there is any argument about it's Engineering Technical expertise. Job placement was also quite impressive. If obtaining the best engineering degree was the primary goal, I think GT was at the top. However, the balance of girls to guys (campus wise) was heavily weighted towards guys (30% total girls). And, we didn't have a scholarship there.....we did at A&M and Auburn.

We didn't feel like there was enough balance in some of the other areas either. Also, being in the big city stressed her out and she felt a little trapped. We were 3/4's the way through the tour and she was ready to go. If she couldn't handle 1 day, there is no way she was going to make 4 years. Kinda felt like Seattle and U of Washington in a sense.

Brother in Law was sad (GT Grad school graduate), but understood. He constantly sent us things about Atlanta and all the cool places. Had a good time otherwise. :)

Definitely a top choice though and appreciate everyone's input!