PDA

View Full Version : Big steel bar thingy


Hunterb
09-20-2005, 04:11 PM
Hi everyone,

I have a 1990 PS 190 that I bought in L.A. and rebuilt over the winter. The trailer is the original unit that was sold with the boat and it was manufactured by T1, which no longer exists. They were taken over by EZ-Loader in 1994 ( I think). It is a tandem axle. It has a large flat bar that the eye on the front of the boat goes through. This bar is about 2 1/2 inches wide, half and inch thick and two feet long. It hinges up and down and appears to be there to prevent the boat from moving forward once it's on the trailer. My question is, for those of you that have a similar device on your trailers, how do you get the boat positioned just right so you can get the eye through the slot on the bar? I find it a major pain to do by myself. If the bar was somehow held up by a spring or something it would be easy, but it's not. Is there a trick to this or is my trailer missing some pieces? :confused:

Any info would be appreciated.

Bruce

Danimal
09-20-2005, 04:18 PM
Nope, you're not missing anything. It's a real pain in the arse. I have only loaded with help so it hasn't been a big deal but I dread to do it alone. My wife is the unlucky one to stand up front and flip the bar up... God bless her. It's got to be a little unerving to stand there while power loading a boat.

Cloaked
09-20-2005, 04:31 PM
I load my boat by myself 99% of the time. Pull the boat up on the trailer, overshoot the bar's position by an inch or two, cross the windshield, reach down and pull it up, wiggle the boat and it will drop backward, right into place for the bar to slide over the eye... ;)

You girlZ need to learn how to improvise... :D You'll thank that bar someday as it will keep the boat out of yEr aRss-end upon a hard stop or collision (been there).

There are also other options talked about here on the board. Search tool will assist.

ski_king
09-20-2005, 04:35 PM
I for one like the bar thingy.
I usually have one of my daughters put it in place when I load, but I can do it fine myself. I got to the point where I know I am up far enough, I get out, put the bar in place and pull out. No big deal.

Hunterb
09-20-2005, 07:17 PM
Thanks for the replies.

What I've found when doing it myself is that I pull the boat up far enough, or a little too far, then get out and try to hook the bar up but the boat tends to slide back when I get out. What I've ended up doing is pulling the boat up and leaving it running in gear as I get out to hook the bar up. This sometimes results in the boat moving too far forward when I get out and then I look like an idiot trying to push the boat backwards while it's in forward gear. I like the idea of the bar as it looks like a good safety feature but I find it a pain to engage. I may look at a way of spring loading it so I can drive up and have it engage automatically, then undo the spring to disengage it when unloading the boat.

Here's something you'll like. When I bought the boat I had to go on an epic journey from Vancouver Island to L.A. to get it which is about 1700 miles one way. The boat was in total disrepair and was essentially an empty hull with a motor. I quickly serviced the wheel bearings and tires, tied a flimsy strap onto the stern and headed north. I got home without incident and proceeded to rebuild the boat. At one point I went to put the lifting eye back in the bow but couldn't engage the threads from above. So I crawled under the bow and up to the front to discover that the front eye had no nuts on the bolts at all and the plate for the lifting eye was missing, which means that the only thing holding the front eye in was the silicone, and the only thing holding the boat to the trailer was the front eye. :mad: It's a good thing there's no steep bumpy hills between L.A. and Vancouver Island or I could have easily launched the boat onto the highway.

Live and learn. Check all fasteners on an unfamiliar boat.

Bruce

RickDV
09-20-2005, 11:10 PM
... tied a flimsy strap onto the stern ...

Aah, there's your savior on that trip. You were lucky.

As for your restoration project...if you don't know by now I'll tell ya that the folks on this board love to see pics. You're the one who brought it up, now ya gotta post some pics! :D

SKI*MC
09-20-2005, 11:21 PM
it takes a while to get used to it i think. One boat launch we go to, you have to floor it just to get it to the eye to hook it, te other boat launch you can idle right up to it.

erkoehler
09-21-2005, 12:57 AM
I for one would love to see some before and after pics of that restoration project.

Workin' 4 Toys
09-21-2005, 03:05 AM
I for one would love to see some before and after pics of that restoration project.
Second that!

X-45
09-21-2005, 09:41 AM
The boat was in total disrepair and was essentially an empty hull with a motor.
Bruce


:popcorn: Tell me you took a lot of pictures beginning to end :popcorn:

Hunterb
09-21-2005, 04:13 PM
Here's a few pics. I posted some earlier but you may have not seen them.

Look at the one labeled 'inside start' first as that's what the interior looked like when I picked it up.

It worked out well and I'm really happy with the boat. I put 80 hours on it this summer without a hitch.

Bruce

erkoehler
09-21-2005, 04:19 PM
THAT IS AWESOME!!! Interior looks great. :)


If you don't mind me asking, what does a boat stripped out like that cost? Interior?


Glad you are getting some great use out of the boat.

Hunterb
09-21-2005, 04:46 PM
I'm not sure if you mean how much did the boat cost, or how much did the interior cost. I'll answer both anyway.

The boat was $3,500 and came with a lot of parts, like the muffler, trim parts and motor box. Everything, and I mean everything, had been removed from the boat and the boat had been sitting for about a year and a half. The boat was stored right next to the ocean in San Pedro, which is basically L.A. harbour and the corrosion of the electrical system was terrible. It also has a nice Airboom tower that I took off because I couldn't get it in my garage. I may put it back in next year.
The internals of the motor were good. Here's what was required to fix it up.

-Remove and refurbish all ancillary motor parts (carb, starter, alternator, water pumps)
-rewire motor and boat (except under the dash)
-repair floor and recarpet
-build back seat, spotter seat, side panels, repair motor box and drivers seat.
-repair gel-coat on back corners (chipped from docking incidents apparently)
wet-sand the entire boat (do not underestimate the time required for that job)
-reassemble all mechanical and electrical components
-install interior pieces
-install all new decals
-remount windshield
vacuum, wax, and away I went.

I did everything myself, except the upholstery. I took all the pieces to a local shop and told them what I wanted as far as colours etc. and they supplied all the foam and vinyl. They did the job for $1,500.

My total costs look like this:

boat $3,500
interior $1,500
parts $750.00 (pumps, electrical things, bits and pieces, hardware, wood, carpet)

Total cost: $5,750 (U.S.)

That's about $6,700 Canadian dollars and I could sell it up here for at least $12,000.....but I don't want to. I would also have to add the cost of driving to L.A. and back to that, and I didn't even get to go to Disneyland or see a single movie star :mad:

That's it. If you have any questions about a 1990 PS 190 I can probably answer them.

Bruce

WilliamsFamLV
09-21-2005, 05:00 PM
Thanks for the replies.

What I've found when doing it myself is that I pull the boat up far enough, or a little too far, then get out and try to hook the bar up but the boat tends to slide back when I get out. What I've ended up doing is pulling the boat up and leaving it running in gear as I get out to hook the bar up. This sometimes results in the boat moving too far forward when I get out and then I look like an idiot trying to push the boat backwards while it's in forward gear. I like the idea of the bar as it looks like a good safety feature but I find it a pain to engage. I may look at a way of spring loading it so I can drive up and have it engage automatically, then undo the spring to disengage it when unloading the boat.

Here's something you'll like. When I bought the boat I had to go on an epic journey from Vancouver Island to L.A. to get it which is about 1700 miles one way. The boat was in total disrepair and was essentially an empty hull with a motor. I quickly serviced the wheel bearings and tires, tied a flimsy strap onto the stern and headed north. I got home without incident and proceeded to rebuild the boat. At one point I went to put the lifting eye back in the bow but couldn't engage the threads from above. So I crawled under the bow and up to the front to discover that the front eye had no nuts on the bolts at all and the plate for the lifting eye was missing, which means that the only thing holding the front eye in was the silicone, and the only thing holding the boat to the trailer was the front eye. :mad: It's a good thing there's no steep bumpy hills between L.A. and Vancouver Island or I could have easily launched the boat onto the highway.

Live and learn. Check all fasteners on an unfamiliar boat.

Bruce


I guess you made fine over "Ashland" Pass, that's pretty steep :eek: :woohoo:

Cloaked
09-21-2005, 05:15 PM
I'm not sure if you mean how much did the boat cost, or how much did the interior cost. I'll answer both anyway.

The boat was $3,500 and came with a lot of parts, like the muffler, trim parts and motor box. Everything, and I mean everything, had been removed from the boat and the boat had been sitting for about a year and a half. The boat was stored right next to the ocean in San Pedro, which is basically L.A. harbour and the corrosion of the electrical system was terrible. It also has a nice Airboom tower that I took off because I couldn't get it in my garage. I may put it back in next year.
The internals of the motor were good. Here's what was required to fix it up.

-Remove and refurbish all ancillary motor parts (carb, starter, alternator, water pumps)
-rewire motor and boat (except under the dash)
-repair floor and recarpet
-build back seat, spotter seat, side panels, repair motor box and drivers seat.
-repair gel-coat on back corners (chipped from docking incidents apparently)
wet-sand the entire boat (do not underestimate the time required for that job)
-reassemble all mechanical and electrical components
-install interior pieces
-install all new decals
-remount windshield
vacuum, wax, and away I went.

I did everything myself, except the upholstery. I took all the pieces to a local shop and told them what I wanted as far as colours etc. and they supplied all the foam and vinyl. They did the job for $1,500.

My total costs look like this:

boat $3,500
interior $1,500
parts $750.00 (pumps, electrical things, bits and pieces, hardware, wood, carpet)

Total cost: $5,750 (U.S.)

That's about $6,700 Canadian dollars and I could sell it up here for at least $12,000.....but I don't want to. I would also have to add the cost of driving to L.A. and back to that, and I didn't even get to go to Disneyland or see a single movie star :mad:

That's it. If you have any questions about a 1990 PS 190 I can probably answer them.

BruceMost excellent. A fine looking machine indeed. Good job. :toast:

roddydog
09-21-2005, 05:43 PM
THAT is an amazing restoration. I might be inclined to replace your big steel bar thingy with a "boat buddy". Slide the pin over, lock it in place, drive your boat onto your trailer and the pin pops into place, done. It's just not meant for long hauls but you can load it yourself.

AirJunky
09-21-2005, 06:21 PM
..............It's a good thing there's no steep bumpy hills between L.A. and Vancouver Island or I could have easily launched the boat onto the highway.

You mean like Grant's Pass? :eek:
Hope you bought lottery tickets that week because you were a lucky guy.
Nice boat, good work.
Don't waste your time with the AB tower though. I can give you a list of people who removed that tower because they are so flimsy. I saw an Aussie rider try a double front flip a few years ago & rip the upper piece off the two lower pieces & completely off the boat....... guess he held on a bit too long!

Hunterb
09-21-2005, 10:50 PM
Really !!!! The Airboom tower is no good!! I like the look of the boat better without it, but I was thinking about putting it back on next summer, largely as a storage rack cause it's a pain tripping over skis all the time. I wakeboard, but not very well. Maybe I'll take a closer look at the tower before I decide to put it on.

Thanks for the heads up.

Bruce