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georgea0731
03-10-2013, 09:07 PM
1st, please excuse the poor quality sketches!
We've picked a basic floor plan then tweeted it, but I'm worried I haven't thought the changes through. I'm also worried about the stair case going downstairs. I allowed 17 feet with about a 4 foot landing. The lot is also limited to 55 feet deep. Septic System limits it to 4 bedrooms.
The lot requires a walk out basement, but gives us the space for 2 bedrooms upstairs and 2 downstairs plus the 2 car garage up and an additional 2 bays downstairs for boat, lawn mowers, friends jet skis, etc. Any input will be appreciated. We're going with America's Home Place for now because of their cheaper cost per square foot.

h2oskifreak
03-10-2013, 10:46 PM
That looks like a great project and nice lot on the lake. Congratulations, I hope it is perfect when completed. Don't under plan. Watch all your door swings, go as far as light switch locations, window placements witin walls for views, etc. The more you plan, the better it will turn out. Make a list of "Must Have" features, "Would Like" and if "Money Allows" features and then let the budget works it's wat through the list. Keep as many Must's and Would Likes as you can.

gotta_ski
03-11-2013, 04:58 AM
Mr grandfather always insisted on 36 inch wide interior doors. It makes it really nice to move things in and out of rooms, and so much easier if you ever have someone in a wheelchair in the house, which he had to use his last few years. It's a feature that is very difficult to add later on.

My dad put outlets under the eves for Christmas lights when my parents built their house. A small thing, but it makes it so easy not to use extension cords.

I'm sure the rest of the guys on here have alot of great tips like this. Many of them have built/had built their homes.

pmkkdx
03-11-2013, 09:09 AM
hard to tell by the quality of the sketches which is upper & lower floors ... and arrangements... but looks like a great lot / location overlooking the lake. Stairs can be tricky if too narrow, too steep and I always think of moving furniture between floors (you might not have that issues if walkout on both floors). I also add a bit more space in garages which are usually cheaper since unheated/uncooled (can lower overall $/sq ft). I also plan on zoned heating/cooling & water heaters to where main living area is separate from spare bedrooms where a portion can be turned off or down when not being used. I designed numerous homes over the past 35+ years and am always looking to cut down on unnecessary/unneeded halls to add that sq footage into more usable/liveable space. You can also design to make more energy efficient with little things that still offer nice appearance.

I would really like to see clearer sketches of the layout and might could offer some suggestions.

Nick911
03-11-2013, 09:21 AM
First off get yourself some graph paper and do some decent to-scale drawings with a ruler and a fine tip pencil. I'll use 1 square = 1 foot so I can get into fine detail.

I do all my own drawings for floor plans then bring them to an engineer to CAD and engineer/certify the plan. As someone who has done numerous houses for myself and other people I can promise you that there will be something you'll wish you had done differently with the plan, but for the love of God, don't hire a builder because he is the cheapest!!!

03 35th Anniversary
03-11-2013, 09:31 AM
I have been playing with a Design Program the past few weeks. It would probably help you out a lot with what you are doing.

Here is a sample of what it looks like.

I have drafted it all myself so it still has along way to go.

Rockman
03-11-2013, 11:25 AM
Sketch the garage first and build the house around it! :D

Thrall
03-11-2013, 12:04 PM
Sketch the garage first and build the house around it! :D

THIS!!! Seriously, if you are a gear head, this is a big consideration. Wife wouldn't put up with a substandard kitchen, so neither should you.
Think big closets and storage space if that fits into the picture.
Regarding stairs, I made a similar mistake (well the architect did and I didn't catch it until it was too late. Had to make an additional landing and turn on both sets of stairs because not enough room was allowed at the bottom for a landing. Figure 12" ea for treads (run) and 7" rise. 17' of run allows you 17 steps which will get you up/down about 10' vertically. If you have 8' basement walls you'll be at 9' total rise to get to the main level floor from the basement floor.

Dylan
03-11-2013, 12:16 PM
First off get yourself some graph paper and do some decent to-scale drawings with a ruler and a fine tip pencil. I'll use 1 square = 1 foot so I can get into fine detail.

I do all my own drawings for floor plans then bring them to an engineer to CAD and engineer/certify the plan. As someone who has done numerous houses for myself and other people I can promise you that there will be something you'll wish you had done differently with the plan, but for the love of God, don't hire a builder because he is the cheapest!!!

Great post here. Also you might consider downloading google sketchup. It's a great program for conceptual design.

zsqure
03-11-2013, 12:20 PM
25 foot deep garage minimum with 8 ft door height. house wrap, expanding foam insulation, don't go cheap on the windows, 9 ft or higher ceiling in the basement so it doesn't feel like a cave. Everything an elderly person would need on the main floor so you can live there as long as possible.

87 TriStar 190
03-12-2013, 02:10 PM
As mentioned before, I designed the garage and tucked the house on the side of that. 46 feet deep so I can leave the Denali connected to the MC all summer. Also have a floor drain and sink with both hot and cold water. Fully insulated and windows for at least some light. Also have attic access for off season 'stuff'. Add a shelf and bar to hang vests on behind the boat so you can easily hang things without getting in and out of the boat. I also added electrical outlets under the eaves for Christmas lights. All outdoor outlets are switched to inside so I don't have to go out and plug them in, or run too many cords. Put a lot of electrical outlets in the garage and basement. Cheap when building and you won't regret it. Add a fan above the boat if you store it there nightly. Really helps to dry it out after a day of skiing. Garage needs to be at least 26 feet deep so you can get around your boat. Deeper if you have a bigger boat. High basement ceiling are important. Most builders have forms for it and you just need to ask.

Put everything in the contract and try to estimate ahead what you will need for allowances and either remove those from the builder and do it yourself, or increase the allowance to line up with your estimates. Can't emphsize that enough.

36 inch wide stairways are great. I also made my stairs straight. Furniture movers love me for that. Also allow staight approach to the stairs for lining things up at top and bottom. A wall right at the bottom of the steps can be difficult.

Put undercabinet lights in you kitchen right away. Hard to wire in later.

Visit the site every day if you can. Changes are easy and usually inexpensive if done before things are closed in.

Be your builders best friend. Ask for his input on the design and for cost drivers. Some things that are expensive may not be important to you. Always be happy when you work with him and let him know how much you appreciate his work. He'll do extra for you. It really counts.

Good luck and keep us posted with photos as it gets going.

skps190
03-13-2013, 04:30 PM
x2 on what 87 Tristar said.

When we built our house I nearly doubled the amount of ceiling lights and then just put dimmer switches in. It is a lot easier to put a dimmer switch in than to add extra can lights after you find out there's not enough light at night. I screwed up and didnt put under cabinet lights in ahead of time, same thing, its easier to do it right away than to wait.

The thing I wish I had done but didn't was make sure I had direct access to a bathroom from the garage. It's one thing to take a leak outside behind the garage but if you gotta drop a deuce and you're working outside it'll pay for itself, not to mention you won't piss your wife off by tracking dirt/mud/grass clippings across the house. Good luck

georgea0731
03-13-2013, 09:42 PM
I tried Google Sketch, but it seemed a little difficult compared to Powerpoint.
Here's the basic room sizes and layout. I did them in PPT, but had to photograph
them since MC doesn't upload PPT on here. Heated Upstairs approx. 2,350
Thanks for all the input so far!

skps190
03-14-2013, 11:33 AM
Try www.floorplanner.com, I used their site for designing my plans for finishing my basement. It takes a bit of playing around with it but once you get the hang of it, its a pretty slick sight. I also liked how you can view your plans in 3D. Best part is its free.

milkmania
03-14-2013, 11:51 AM
you asked for home design input....
I still like the pass through garage idea! http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=48379&highlight=garage

it may or may not fit in your size limitations, but man it sure looks like it could help with a narrow lot:twocents:

TRBenj
03-14-2013, 04:29 PM
Agree with everyone else... you really need to get this into a better format so we can see the layout. Powerpoint isnt going to cut it.

When you lay it out and repost, be sure to include the orientation. I am unclear as to which side faces the lake vs. the road. On a lakefront piece of property, front = lake side, back = road side.

While I would normally agree to keep the garage at the forefront of your design considerations, the fact that this is a lakefront home changes everything. Use and view of the water are king, not where you park.

JohnE
03-14-2013, 09:09 PM
Agree with everyone else... you really need to get this into a better format so we can see the layout. Powerpoint isnt going to cut it.

When you lay it out and repost, be sure to include the orientation. I am unclear as to which side faces the lake vs. the road. On a lakefront piece of property, front = lake side, back = road side.

While I would normally agree to keep the garage at the forefront of your design considerations, the fact that this is a lakefront home changes everything. Use and view of the water are king, not where you park.

Totally agree about the garage at a lake house. Lake and living would be my priority.

Huge garage takes up a ton of space that often isnt available on the water

mikeg205
03-14-2013, 09:13 PM
don't forget to design this flip mechanism... you never know.. ;)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P2RDh0EqRH8

87 TriStar 190
04-03-2013, 01:29 PM
I agree with having bathroom access from the garage. One of my homes, I had to cross carpet to get to the bathroom. Aviod that. Mine is inside, but only a few steps across a tiled floor to get there.

onewheat
04-03-2013, 02:51 PM
Is this Lake House as in 'second home' or Primary Residence that happens to luckily be on a lake? What's the intended usage of the house - how many residents, year-round, etc?

georgea0731
04-13-2013, 11:38 AM
The front view is reverse since we flipped the floor plan. Adding the 3rd garage, a 13x34 garage on the side, door is suppose to be 10 x 8, but wondering if I should go 10 x 9s?
Anyone know the price difference since the builder says I'm way over budget right now. I talking to the bank for more money. There is not upstairs just a walk out basement. I've got a 4th garage bay downstairs, but it's only 21 feet and has a 4 foot corner unuseable. Plus its way up front and may be a problems that close to the front. it may need a wall there. I'm thinking of switching it with the storage room, but the stair case limits it's length too. It's amazing, you change 1 little thing and it affects some many others both up and down.

mikeg205
04-13-2013, 12:16 PM
At least pour some pads for a lift. Then you can restore a S&S off a trailer. :)

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/product_200485288_200485288

03 35th Anniversary
04-13-2013, 12:36 PM
Very Nice!!!