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02ProstarSammyD
02-11-2013, 09:58 AM
Hey guys random question. I keep hearing that dealers won't sell you a boat outside of their market. I've not had good luck with my local dealer on many occasions. I actually took a liking to the x10 this weekend but wouldn't give this dealer a dime for fear of a nightmare down the road. Truth to this?

mzimme
02-11-2013, 10:02 AM
I'll bet Jim@BAWS would sell you a boat... :D

JBrew
02-11-2013, 10:15 AM
I've heard that if you buy a MC out of your market. The dealer you purchase from has to give a percentage to your home market dealer. This is to discourage dealers from taking business from out of their market. Not 100% on this but again what I heard.

Jonb1822
02-11-2013, 10:17 AM
I assume we are talking about new boats?

thatsmrmastercraft
02-11-2013, 10:18 AM
Having worked for several manufacturers that have dealer-protected sales areas, there is always a way around this. Sometimes it requires working with the manufacturer but that is typically initiated through the dealer. Find a dealer you want to work with and explain to them your situation. They will find a way to accommodate you. Good luck.

JBrew
02-11-2013, 10:19 AM
I assume we are talking about new boats?

Yes you would be correct

Jim@BAWS
02-11-2013, 10:22 AM
I'll bet Jim@BAWS would sell you a boat... :D

I would love to sell a boat...but yes there are dealer protected areas.

Jim@BAWS

Heelgrad
02-11-2013, 10:34 AM
I believe that if you can document and/or substantiate the underlying issues that have you apprehensive about buying from your local dealer then you can buy from another dealer. But I do think there is some sort of profit sharing clause in there to protect them. Knowing where you live I can assure you it's not a far drive to an outstanding dealership in my neck of the woods.

Prostarski190
02-11-2013, 10:34 AM
Hey guys random question. I keep hearing that dealers won't sell you a boat outside of their market. I've not had good luck with my local dealer on many occasions. I actually took a liking to the x10 this weekend but wouldn't give this dealer a dime for fear of a nightmare down the road. Truth to this?

02ProstarSammyD, what area and dealer are you talking about? I'm looking at a boat long distance and was considering letting the local dealer in Raleigh NC check it out for me. I noticed on the boat show thread you weren't impressed with that local dealer. Do you live in the Raleigh area. Thanks

Sodar
02-11-2013, 11:19 AM
No problem going outside your area. Your local dealer might get a little butt hurt and threaten not to service the boat, but by law, there is nothing anyone can do to tell you where to buy your boat from. And yes, I am speaking from experience.

02ProstarSammyD
02-11-2013, 11:37 AM
02ProstarSammyD, what area and dealer are you talking about? I'm looking at a boat long distance and was considering letting the local dealer in Raleigh NC check it out for me. I noticed on the boat show thread you weren't impressed with that local dealer. Do you live in the Raleigh area. Thanks

Boats unlimited. I just haven't been impressed with them at all. Nothing terrifying like hearing about warranty work etc, but I've been in the store 2x to grab parts and both times was looking at new boats..........both times not one person cared to help me. Went to the boat show and while they had a huge booth with prob 30 boats I sat for 15 min in an x10 and came back 45 min later after getting the kids some brownies and did the same. Not once was I asked even how I was doing. One sales guy made direct eye contact with me, turned around, and walked away.

I know its not a big deal but I'm not going to beg anyone to write them a check. I am also worried about warranty work if I buy from another market too though.


Also just to let you know if you need a boat checked out in raleigh I can take a quick look or if you need detailed check out done contact diego at

Powerboat Service Inc
4200 Atlantic Ave #148 Raleigh, NC 27604
(919) 790-7760

He is by far the best boat guy in Raleigh and does check outs regularly. I'd swear by him on my lefty

JimN
02-11-2013, 11:53 AM
If you use the boat in an area that's not near your home, it really shouldn't be a big deal. Better to buy it close to the water than drag it across the country and back.

bobx1
02-11-2013, 12:09 PM
I had to get "permission" to purchase out of local dealer territory. The dealer I purchased from had to submit (it may have just been a phone call) my reasoning and MC made it clear not to expect my local dealer to perform warranty work. The dealer I purchased from was 3.5 hours away so it was not that big of a deal.

gweaver
02-11-2013, 04:24 PM
No experience with boat dealers, but that sounds rather odd that MC (or any other manufacturer) would state that a local dealer is under no obligation to perform warranty work. Seems like warranty work should be covered by ANY dealer. I know we have a Toyota van, purchased in Florida, but we've had warranty work done on it in California, still fully covered by Toyota.

G

jafo9
02-11-2013, 04:30 PM
so if i buy a boat here at rambo where i live and then i move to texas, i can't get warranty work done in texas?

Theclarks1111
02-11-2013, 04:33 PM
I have had some experience with this as well. I live on the Alabama side of a lake that is split down the middle between Alabama and Georgia. The Georgia Mastercraft dealer is actually an easier and more convenient drive for me to get to, however, they straight up told me that they did not want to do business with me and wanted me to go to the Alabama dealership. I couldn't even believe it.

JimN
02-11-2013, 05:03 PM
No experience with boat dealers, but that sounds rather odd that MC (or any other manufacturer) would state that a local dealer is under no obligation to perform warranty work. Seems like warranty work should be covered by ANY dealer. I know we have a Toyota van, purchased in Florida, but we've had warranty work done on it in California, still fully covered by Toyota.

G

This isn't like cars- boat dealers don't have service departments with 20 techs. If you complain about how long it takes to get your boat serviced, do you really want your dealer to put someone ahead of you when they didn't buy their boat from your dealer? I don't think so. Look at the number of cars sold by Toyota vs the boats sold by MC- Toyota sold 4Million last year alone, if I heard it correctly. MC sold about 3000. Think about it. How many dealers does each manufacturer have?

broncotw
02-11-2013, 05:14 PM
So then to echo "jafo9" -- what happens in the event you purcahse a MasterCraft in one state and then reloacte to another state? Is the MasterCraft dealership in your new location obligated to service your boat?

JimN
02-11-2013, 05:20 PM
So then to echo "jafo9" -- what happens in the event you purcahse a MasterCraft in one state and then reloacte to another state? Is the MasterCraft dealership in your new location obligated to service your boat?

If someone relocates, the best thing to do is contact MC to let them know.

jeff shelton
02-11-2013, 05:23 PM
I've purchased 3 new mastercrafts from Jimmy at Texas Mastercraft. If I buy another new one it will be from him. I was working and living in Dallas when I purchased the first but my permanent address was still in TN. I was out of state when I purchased the other 2. Grandfathered in maybe.
Last year at the boat show while talking to Jimmy and the MC rep. The rep asked why I purchased from Jimmy. I explained to him the situation and that I would buy another brand before I would purchase a new one in my market area. That was a lie, I would just buy a used one from another dealer. He basically said that they would rather you buy local but it doesn't really matter.
I actually took one of the boats in for winterization and some warranty work at my local dealer in TN. I scheduled the appointment and made it clear that all the work needs to be performed while it was there. I got a call a couple days later. They had done the winterization and had checked the other issue and diagnost it but I would have to bring it back in the spring because they were to busy to do the work. They said the repairs would be covered under warranty and it would be noted in the system.
I took the boat back in the spring. They called the following day to inform me that it would not be covered under warranty and it would cost $500 to fix. If they didn't make the repairs I would still have to pay for the disassembly and reassembly which would have cost about $300. Pissed off I just said fix it. They blamed it on the stereo installation but I argued that they had diagnosed it in the fall and said it was warranty and if it would have been the installers fault I would have taken it back to him and would not have been charged for the repair. It all kind of worked out since I was having him install another stereo and speakers in another boat for me and he discounted the install due to the repairs they made.
They even had the nerve when they called to tell me it was ready to ask if they could replace the Texas Mastercraft sticker on the back with one of theirs. They also wanted to know if I would be interested in purchasing the guide pole covers with their name. My answer was not given very politely.

gts-20
02-11-2013, 06:37 PM
Our boat was purchased from Houston Mastercraft right before they went out of business. We contacted MC directly about what dealer we should use to finish some warranty issues that Houston MC had already ordered parts for, but hadnít completed. Mastercraft corporate was very proactive, and let us choose between Texas Ski Ranch and Texas Mastercraft, adding that they were both in their top tear of dealers. MC called ahead and made the necessary arrangements for us @ TSR to get the ball rolling. We couldnít have been happier. We have developed a great relationship with the service and sales people there, and make the 3.5 hour drive there from Houston for all our service and repairs.

Since then, Dockside Marine has become Mastercraft's Houston dealer. We have been considering purchasing a x14v, but would only want to buy it from TSR. Will Mastercraft not allow that to happen?

bobx1
02-11-2013, 06:57 PM
The warranty work clause (that I agreed to) had NOTHING to do with relocating. Here is what happened:

Had some issues with local dealer on a non-MC boat I purchased from them.

Some friends had some issues with the MC's they purchased from them.

Decided I wanted an MC and a guy on the board gave me the name of his dealer (3.5 hours from me).

Dealer had a new MC that I wanted and matched my criteria.

I cut a deal with the dealer but in order to get the boat, I had to agree with the warranty work clause.

I dont blame the local dealer as I assume he told MC.... "Fine. Let him buy out of territory but dont ask me to take care of him."

I understand MC's side and the local dealer's side. I knew UPFRONT that I could not expect the local dealer to help me out in a bind or with warranty issues. I never asked or expected the local dealer to do me any favors and cant blame them.

JohnE
02-11-2013, 07:04 PM
I haven't read the whole thread. But from experience I know you can buy out of market. You may need to substantiate the decision of why in writing. I also know that your local dealer can actually file a grievence with MC and if it is upheld, the selling dealer needs to pay the local dealer a percentage. It's always best to deal with your local dealer unless that is just not possible/ feasible.

rtw_travel
02-11-2013, 07:07 PM
Do dealers not make money on warranty work? I would have thought they'd be happy to get another boat in for warranty work or servicing regardless of who sold it initially.

It doesn't make sense to me that a dealer pout about not getting the initial sale, when I would think the bulk of the profit comes from service. I take JimN's point about the difference in volume between Toyota vs MasterCraft, but as a dealer I would be trying to service any mastercraft that came in the door and convert those people to be my long term customers.

What am i missing here?

jeff shelton
02-11-2013, 07:10 PM
My personal opinion/experience is that the only dealers that will be pissed off or have an attitude are just mad because you payed less for the boat than they typically sell theirs for and I'm not talking about 2 or 3 thousand.

JohnE
02-11-2013, 07:12 PM
Every dealer HAS to service a MC boat in a timely manner if it is brought in to them. It is part of their dealer agreement. Refusal is grounds for losing the franchise. Granted, they don't have to go the extra mile though.

JohnE
02-11-2013, 07:14 PM
So then to echo "jafo9" -- what happens in the event you purcahse a MasterCraft in one state and then reloacte to another state? Is the MasterCraft dealership in your new location obligated to service your boat?

As stated above, they are definitely obligated to service your boat.

02ProstarSammyD
02-11-2013, 07:18 PM
thats one of my big concerns. Buy a boat 2 hours down the road and then the local dealer lags on any warranty work

Rockman
02-11-2013, 07:21 PM
I had to get "permission" to purchase out of local dealer territory. The dealer I purchased from had to submit (it may have just been a phone call) my reasoning and MC made it clear not to expect my local dealer to perform warranty work. The dealer I purchased from was 3.5 hours away so it was not that big of a deal.

What is this...Russia? What a load of BS...nice way of doing business :rolleyes:...deson't matter where you buy your boat...same manufacturer...provide the service to the buyer...I don't see this when my truck needs repair...any Chevy dealer will fix it.

The entire problem stems from bad dealers whereas issues should be addressed by MC, bottom line. You can't blame other dealers for going above and beyond to satisfy a customer...

02ProstarSammyD
02-11-2013, 07:34 PM
What is this...Russia?
что случилось с Россией мудак?

JimN
02-11-2013, 07:58 PM
Do dealers not make money on warranty work? I would have thought they'd be happy to get another boat in for warranty work or servicing regardless of who sold it initially.

It doesn't make sense to me that a dealer pout about not getting the initial sale, when I would think the bulk of the profit comes from service. I take JimN's point about the difference in volume between Toyota vs MasterCraft, but as a dealer I would be trying to service any mastercraft that came in the door and convert those people to be my long term customers.

What am i missing here?

When a dealer is slammed in the middle of Summer, adding to the burden isn't a good thing. How happy they would be depends completely on how busy they are and you should consider the dealer's desire to service the boats that were bought from them. Nobody wants to be told that they aren't the #1 priority of a dealer but the customers who bought their boats from a given dealer don't want someone coming in and expecting to be placed at the head of the line, either. 'First come, first served' is great, as long as the dealer's resources (read, staff) aren't stretched too thin already. Service techs for boats aren't like auto service techs in number, or in career view. It's far less likely to find marine service techs who see their job as a career, and that's unfortunate. It's also a sad fact. There are many reasons for this.

When I was working on these, there was no rule against working on a warranty claim when the boat was sold somewhere else. I would want to talk to someone at MC to get a clarification before stating it as fact.

Kweisner
02-11-2013, 08:10 PM
My experience with this is from a different field, but I think the same principles apply. That said, I am not suggesting this is MasterCraft's actual policy--just offering some real world retail perspective.

Protected Territories and Manufacturer Mandated pricing are methods of discouraging dealers from undercutting one another. The stronger policy (mandated pricing) is what companies like Apple, Bose and Dyson vacs do-- they set the price and retailers will lose the line if they sell below retail. Hence, these products are never advertised on sale (closeouts are a different story).

Other companies take a softer approach which is territorial protection. The origins were to protect franchisees and dealers from the concern they'd invest to build the brand awareness in their territory and then another dealership would open up down the block. Worked pretty well, because most people wouldn't know where to find another dealer outside their locality. . .until the Internets were invented. That changed everything.

Now, the territory concept has become a soft method to protect a dealer's market from undercutting across the Internet. Selling out of market is referred to gray marketing and some companies warn consumers that they will not get warranty support if they buy on the gray market. Quite common in the high end audio field. The problem with this approach is that the manufacturer presumes all their dealers are equally good--a quaint notion. In reality, the dealer that gives the best service should be able to get any business they've earned. And the consumer should not be the whipping boy that is forced to buy from a sub-standard dealer or face warranty issues.

Now don't get me wrong--I run two consumer retail companies, so I'm not unsympathetic to retailers! To wit. . .

Dealers often get shafted by the consumer that comes to their showroom, ties up their resources but never had any intention of buying there. They either already had a remote boat picked out and wanted to "touch and feel", or used the dealer to "showroom" and then bought where they could get the lowest price from a dealer that hadn't made any investment of time to make the sale. A current classic example is what happens at BestBuy. People shop, touch and demo there and then buy in the parking lot from Amazon. Is that ethical?

This can be pretty discouraging to a good dealer--but the very best dealers accept this as table stakes and don't obsess over the dishonorable people. Instead they play the long game and treat everyone well with the knowledge that on balance they'll build a good business of repeat clientele that values their expertise, commitment and goodwill. From what I can tell, Jim at BAWS is the epitome of this concept.

My 2 cents. . .

KahunaCraft
02-11-2013, 09:37 PM
+1 with just about everything said by kweisner. I'm not convinced today's sellers and buyers are as ethical in the sense you describe as they were before online retail.

It goes on in other business transactions too...if you eat a sample at Costco, is that unethical? ( I get your point too...different angle) ... Hey, this isn't an MP3 player on ebay or a 15.00 box of pasta for 35 people...unfair comparison, maybe.

In my view, dealers need to be on their toes answering questions and dealing with the tire/hull kickers, that's the business. I have spent a lot of time flying between North America and Europe for coffee with a prospect so my opinion is based on that (other end of the scale).

Back to the post, I'd try to work with the local dealer and if they seem helpful, ask for a reference customer. tour their facilities, ask who's been on the MC training? What is their hourly rate? Do they have other services your preferred dealer doesn't have?

If after that you decide to stick with your original dealer, do it for business reasons. He saved you time or money or avoided headaches....all good valid business reasons for sticking with them.

Edit: +1 on Jim@baws

JimN
02-11-2013, 09:54 PM
+1 with just about everything said by kweisner. I'm not convinced today's sellers and buyers are as ethical in the sense you describe as they were before online retail.

It goes on in other business transactions too...if you eat a sample at Costco, is that unethical? ( I get your point too...different angle) ... Hey, this isn't an MP3 player on ebay or a 15.00 box of pasta for 35 people...unfair comparison, maybe.

In my view, dealers need to be on their toes answering questions and dealing with the tire/hull kickers, that's the business. I have spent a lot of time flying between North America and Europe for coffee with a prospect so my opinion is based on that (other end of the scale).

Back to the post, I'd try to work with the local dealer and if they seem helpful, ask for a reference customer. tour their facilities, ask who's been on the MC training? What is their hourly rate? Do they have other services your preferred dealer doesn't have?

If after that you decide to stick with your original dealer, do it for business reasons. He saved you time or money or avoided headaches....all good valid business reasons for sticking with them.

Anyone who might need to go to a dealer for service should realize that an adversarial relationship is a bad way to operate and one thing I noticed when I worked at the boat dealers was the occasional attitude of "Dealer- service me" (take that to mean anything you want). Likewise, a dealer needs to see things from the potential boat buyer's viewpoint. It's hard to do, when so many people go in to look/touch/test drive and go somewhere else to buy it for $500 less without giving the first dealer a chance to match the price. Yeah, it happens. That doesn't even come close to covering the sales tax. Usually, this was the buyer who could barely afford the boat, so they would try to grind us harder than anyone else. Some of the best buyers were the ones who saw the price and wrote a check, sometimes for another boat, like a pontoon for the wife. One of the worst things about doing service has to do with people omitting pertinent information so we would do the work under warranty, even though the damage was caused by abuse through negligence, stupidity or ignorance.

KahunaCraft
02-11-2013, 11:48 PM
Yes JimN, attitude always plays a big role on both sides. Again, give the local guy a chance to win the business.

musicmd
02-11-2013, 11:58 PM
A clarifying question, if you please, one which I hope will be answered by the MC dealers on the list. Doesn't MC pay the dealer for warranty service?

How could it be any other way? If I buy a new boat in Wisconsin then move to Alabama, doesn't my MC dealer in Alabama have to do the warranty service? And, doesn't MC reimburse them for that work?

From my experience working for a manufacturer, there is nothing in US law which prohibits a consumer from buying a product from anyone they choose. I live in Madison, Wisconsin; if a Honda dealer in Chicago makes me a better deal on a new car or bike, I can buy it there and fully expect that the local Honda dealer will do the warranty work covered by the factory (and be PAID to do it.) Is the situation with the MC dealer any different?

That said, I agree with the sentiment that you should allow your local dealer to earn your business. Hopefully, they will do so (as Redline Watersports did for me here in Madison - - - they came through and I'm thrilled I can rely on them for all my MC needs moving forward.)

However, there is no law saying I can't buy a new MC in Chicago or Milwaukee and, if I understand US law correctly, there is nothing prohibiting me from having my factory service done locally, regardless of where the boat was purchased.

onewheat
02-12-2013, 02:13 AM
MC does reimburse the dealers for warranty work. Warranty work is not as profitable for dealers as customer pay work is though. At Honda - the customer labor rate was $94 an hour, but the warranty rate was more like $45 an hour. If I'm doing warranty work all day and getting paid $20, the dealer is making $25/hr x 8 hr = $200 after paying me. If I am doing customer pay work all day, I still get my $20/hr but the dealer is making $74/hr x 8 hr = $592 after paying me. This is figuring on hourly rate, not flat rate service, where warranty actually pays the tech and the dealer less because Honda would pay the dealer based on "warranty time", which is always less than "customer time".

Jim@BAWS
02-12-2013, 04:06 AM
This can be pretty discouraging to a good dealer--but the very best dealers accept this as table stakes and don't obsess over the dishonorable people. Instead they play the long game and treat everyone well with the knowledge that on balance they'll build a good business of repeat clientele that values their expertise, commitment and goodwill. From what I can tell, Jim at BAWS is the epitome of this concept.

My 2 cents. . .

+If after that you decide to stick with your original dealer, do it for business reasons. He saved you time or money or avoided headaches....all good valid business reasons for sticking with them.

Edit: +1 on Jim@baws

Thanks for the postive comments!. It can be a little tough sometimes, especially in Florida. Folks come in all the time for all over! Wanting test drives and pricing. We try to accomodate the best we can and then contact the dealer in the selling areas. That is the best we cab do!

Jim@BAWS

Kweisner
02-12-2013, 06:41 AM
Thanks for the postive comments!. It can be a little tough sometimes, especially in Florida. Folks come in all the time for all over! Wanting test drives and pricing. We try to accomodate the best we can and then contact the dealer in the selling areas. That is the best we cab do!

Jim@BAWS

Seems to met those other dealers have an opportunity to do the right thing and share a bit of their profit on the referral. My company has a family of individual businesses and we often refer customers to the brand that offers the best fit--we share our margin in these cases. This way, the client gets the best possible experience and none of us are conflicted about handing off the customer.

maxpower220
02-12-2013, 08:32 AM
Funny, I have never had a dealer ask me where I was from or where I lived. I have never had an issue with a dealer servicing or doing warranty work. Over the 20 years of transferring in the Navy, I purchased boats here, there, and yonder. Due to moves, other dealers serviced or did warranty work. Not once did I ever get questioned about where the boat was from nor did I ever contact the manufacturer.

Note, 1 Malibu, 1 Moomba, and 2 MCs were owned new during my experience.

Rockman
02-12-2013, 08:36 AM
Warranty work is not as profitable for dealers as customer pay work is though.

Speaking in general here...

Oh well, then close your doors and move on...part of the business...deal with it. Glad I know I am welcomed once my boat is out of warranty and I have to fork out money on my own to get it fixed as opposed to getting an issue with a new boat fixed.

If warranty work is such a pita, then don't offer warranties and see how many people buy your product. If warranty work is so much to deal with, the need to step back and determine why your product has so many problems within the warranty period and correct the problem going forward...makes sense, doesn't it?:rolleyes:

JimN
02-12-2013, 08:56 AM
Funny, I have never had a dealer ask me where I was from or where I lived. I have never had an issue with a dealer servicing or doing warranty work. Over the 20 years of transferring in the Navy, I purchased boats here, there, and yonder. Due to moves, other dealers serviced or did warranty work. Not once did I ever get questioned about where the boat was from nor did I ever contact the manufacturer.

Note, 1 Malibu, 1 Moomba, and 2 MCs were owned new during my experience.

Out of warranty, nobody cares where the boat was bought. In-warranty allows the manufacturer to track boats, dealers' performance and technical updates. Some updates are critical to the longevity of the drive system or safety of the users- if these aren't performed, it cam mean problems during the warranty period, which costs the manufacturer, but the worse ones cause problems after the warranty ends, costing the user or a second buyer a lot of money and time lost. If the dealer neglects to perform updates and a boat is serviced by the same dealer through its life and a problem that should have been avoided by one update or another, it shows that the dealer dropped the ball, or the owner didn't bother to take the boat in, even though they may have known about it. In warranty, MC sends notices to the dealer and/or user. It's not in anyone's best interest to ignore these, no matter how inconvenient.

musicmd
02-12-2013, 11:42 PM
I would expect that MC has pretty specific expectations of their dealers regarding warranty service. It shouldn't matter where a boat is purchased - - - if warranty service is needed, it should be done at an acceptable level, no matter where the boat was purchased.

Anything less than that, a dealer will likely get contacted by the MC factory. High quality service, warranty or otherwise, has to be part of the agreement that MC has with its dealers.

Ideally, a buyer will take the boat back to his original dealer for any warranty service. But, this isn't always the case. There are a lot of reasons why this might not happen. Whatever the reason, the consumer shouldn't have to suffer if they have to move or can't return to their original place of purchase every time the boat needs attention.

And, even if the factory doesn't pay quite as much for service as end-users do, the factory service keeps the lights on, pays for overhead, salaries, etc., and it is an important part of a MC dealer's business. At the very least, MC dealers should want to keep boats in good working condition.

IMHO, dealers who grumble about having to do factory service on a boat they didn't actually sell are missing the point. And, it isn't just that they may feel they're not getting paid for their work (which, actually, they are.) If I buy a boat from dealer A then move to another location which is serviced by dealer B, dealer B should want to do a great job for me when I need factory service.

Why?

Well, because many MC owners will someday be in the market for another boat and they will be more likely to bring business to dealer B if they have had a good experience. Also, there is the reality that my boat will be outside the warranty period at some point - - - dealer B has a better chance of getting that work if they have taken good care of me along the way.

onewheat
02-13-2013, 01:04 AM
Speaking in general here...

Oh well, then close your doors and move on...part of the business...deal with it. Glad I know I am welcomed once my boat is out of warranty and I have to fork out money on my own to get it fixed as opposed to getting an issue with a new boat fixed.

If warranty work is such a pita, then don't offer warranties and see how many people buy your product. If warranty work is so much to deal with, the need to step back and determine why your product has so many problems within the warranty period and correct the problem going forward...makes sense, doesn't it?:rolleyes:

The dealership I worked for never complained about or turned away warranty work. WE welcomed you in every time you came. If you come in to get something done on warranty, maybe you also needed some routine maintenance as well where we could make a little more money (oil change, tire rotation, etc). For who is warranty service a PITA to deal with? Manufacturers have the warranty - dealers do the service work. It's part of the deal with having a dealership. Not sure I get your point? :confused:

Rockman
02-13-2013, 10:56 AM
The dealership I worked for never complained about or turned away warranty work. WE welcomed you in every time you came. If you come in to get something done on warranty, maybe you also needed some routine maintenance as well where we could make a little more money (oil change, tire rotation, etc). For who is warranty service a PITA to deal with? Manufacturers have the warranty - dealers do the service work. It's part of the deal with having a dealership. Not sure I get your point? :confused:

Yes, manufacturers are responsible for the cost of the warranty repairs, both for the parts and paying a dealer to do the labor, but I know one dealer who basically flat out told me that they stay away from warranty work (for whatever reason I do not know). Maybe as someone mentioned above, they get paid less for doing warranty work than actual work on older boats that are out of warranty.:confused:

The dealership I am referring to was (still is) a piece of work and they are still in business...I had the PLEASURE of going there one time to pick up a part MC gave me direct (long story, right after we bought our BF200, part was missign from the boat) and when I picked the part up, the owner of the dealer told me that I was LUCKY that MC did that for me and never to expect anything like that to happen again...my wife almost punched him right across the counter!

Do not get me wrong, there are alot of great dealers out there and that's the reason this whole thread started. Reward the good, stay away from the bad but it is not as easy as that.

Thank goodness for FedEx and some guys on the TMC board for helping me with my maintenance.

JimN
02-13-2013, 11:09 AM
Yes, manufacturers are responsible for the cost of the warranty repairs, both for the parts and paying a dealer to do the labor, but I know one dealer who basically flat out told me that they stay away from warranty work (for whatever reason I do not know). Maybe as someone mentioned above, they get paid less for doing warranty work than actual work on older boats that are out of warranty.:confused:

The dealership I am referring to was (still is) a piece of work and they are still in business...I had the PLEASURE of going there one time to pick up a part MC gave me direct (long story, right after we bought our BF200, part was missign from the boat) and when I picked the part up, the owner of the dealer told me that I was LUCKY that MC did that for me and never to expect anything like that to happen again...my wife almost punched him right across the counter!

Do not get me wrong, there are alot of great dealers out there and that's the reason this whole thread started. Reward the good, stay away from the bad but it is not as easy as that.

Thank goodness for FedEx and some guys on the TMC board for helping me with my maintenance.

If a dealer refuses to do warranty work, they should lose the franchise, IMO. At the very least, MC should hear about it ASAP.

jeff shelton
02-13-2013, 11:18 AM
If a dealer was refusing to do warranty work for me regardless if MC gets involved afterwards. I would not want them to be working on it. They already don't want to do it so what kind of work do you think that they will do if they are forced.

JimN
02-13-2013, 11:41 AM
If a dealer was refusing to do warranty work for me regardless if MC gets involved afterwards. I would not want them to be working on it. They already don't want to do it so what kind of work do you think that they will do if they are forced.

The biggest problem with this whole situation is that MC can't have someone there all the time, so the dealer can act all happy, happy, joy, joy when the rep is there and like a complete DB as soon as the rep leaves. I have seen it in action and the guy who did this basically stole the dealership from the founder because he thought he knew how it should be run, without having a single clue in his freakin' head. Unfortunately for the boat owners and MC, Wisconsin has a law that makes it almost impossible to pull a franchise from a dealer, regardless of the fact that they're the worst on the planet. That damages the relationship between the customer and manufacturer and this may never be repaired to any kind of meaningful degree. Then, the customer tells their friends, they tell their friends and the bad rep expands exponentially.

A dealer who gets into the business because they want to get rich had better be backed by some decent business experience, have a great plan with contingencies in place and a bunch of money because the one universal thing about plans is that "Nobody else cares about your plan". If they get in "because I really like boating/skiing/whatever-ing", they should just do something else because these people WILL fail unless they understand customer service and have some kind of decent organizational skills.

The joke in the industry is-

Q- "How do you make a small fortune in the marine industry?"

A- Start with a large one.

02ProstarSammyD
02-27-2013, 03:55 PM
I just had to bring this back up b/c I am dying laughing and pissed off here. One MC dealer in particular should read this since he posts boats on this site. When I call your parts department 4 freaking times to check on a part you should freaking return a call. When I send my g/f to your shop to take pictures of a boat we are interested in buying and she purchases a visor you say you have in stock it should not take 3+ weeks to mail it 2 hours down the road. These 2 put together make it come off like you couldn't beat a dead horse to death lil alone manage warranty on a boat I buy from you. Piss poor handling of customers. Makes me want to puke that you sell Mastercrafts or that I would ever be directed to buy one from you.

There are 2 really freaking good guys I've dealt with and I just want to say THANK GOD FOR THE GOOD ONES. Jim@baws jumped through hoops to overnight me a starter for a boat so I could save a weekend on the water and Midwest MC mailed me the most f'd up cluster order of 20 items/parts in 12 hours. WHY CAN'T my in state dealers not suck????????????????????? HULK MADDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDDD

Also excuse me for my completely blown out of proportion attitude about a freaking hat and parts but c'mon its a complete lack of customer service. God my ****** is raging

Wake190
03-05-2013, 05:49 PM
I'm in Raleigh and get a similar vibe from our local dealer. Hate to say it, but you might want to "file your grievance" by taking a hard look at what Pro Marine and White Lake are offering. Lots of nice inboards at the boat show this year. That X10 is a sweet boat, but might not be worth the hassle...

mikeg205
03-05-2013, 06:13 PM
I'm in Raleigh and get a similar vibe from our local dealer. Hate to say it, but you might want to "file your grievance" by taking a hard look at what Pro Marine and White Lake are offering. Lots of nice inboards at the boat show this year. That X10 is a sweet boat, but might not be worth the hassle...

Bingo.... as much as I like MC - If I had the means for new, I probably would consider another brand if I only had a Jerky MC dealer nearby.

02ProstarSammyD
03-05-2013, 07:30 PM
I'm in Raleigh and get a similar vibe from our local dealer. Hate to say it, but you might want to "file your grievance" by taking a hard look at what Pro Marine and White Lake are offering. Lots of nice inboards at the boat show this year. That X10 is a sweet boat, but might not be worth the hassle..

Yea I really like Jimmy over at promarine but last I heard they are recently under new ownership. Waiting to see how that shakes out but I throw him business with boards and bs parts. Haven't had any experience with white lake

mikeg205
03-05-2013, 08:12 PM
I was thinking about this a bunch as I was clearing the driveway. A good dealer - one that is customer oriented and proud to represent a brand will take care of warranty issues without any apprehension. Unfortunately each brand has good dealers and bad dealers. Case in point got a new 2013 Fusion - the dealer 1 mile away was great - but I had to shop and went to a ford dealer 6 miles away... the one further away was smarmy... I went with the dealer 1 mile away...

Being in sales I think it's bad business to turn away the occasional out of your "protected" market customer. Too many business people for get when a customer is ticked off he will tell 9 people - when they are happy they will tell 1. Most people I know who can buy new boats have friends who can buy new boats...

I know the industry has been slammed - but being a jerky dealer is bad business...

Wake190
03-05-2013, 08:27 PM
Yea I really like Jimmy over at promarine but last I heard they are recently under new ownership. Waiting to see how that shakes out but I throw him business with boards and bs parts. Haven't had any experience with white lake
Fortunately I have limited experience with all of the local dealers. Lucky to handle most of the work on my 96 Prostar myself (knock on wood). Jimmy is great. He has provided the boats at Hyco for Wake N Flake the past three years. The White Lake folks have a good reputation and they are always friendly at the boat show. Good luck.

onewheat
03-05-2013, 11:31 PM
We always had people tell us they went to another local Honda dealer to buy their car because they would save a couple hundred or $500, but then they'd come to us for service because they thought the other dealer was a bunch of jerks. We heard that ALL the time - people go wherever they can to save a few bucks.