PDA

View Full Version : Long Distance Boat Towing


AZDave
01-14-2013, 09:48 AM
What suggestions, tips, advice does anyone have for me on towing my boat 400 miles. Tie down straps, obviously, no cover for sure, are there any other things to consider? The only thing I can think of, other than a jack and a spare, is one of those broom like mud flaps you see behind an RV.

Rockman
01-14-2013, 10:24 AM
Where are you towing from and where to? That will help decide what precautions you will need to take and what obstacles you may be up against...

So far, what you mentioned is a good start...

Why no cover? Depends on which cover you have though...as some covers will leave markings , others will not but will protect your boat in case of bad weather.

Brings tools, basic necessities like duct tape, electrical tape, wire ties, extra tie downs, etc.

Make sure your tow vehicle and trailer are in good working condition in terms of trans and brakes.

There is a thread on here that someone had asked this question last summer and provided a good listing and discussion of items.


Make sure you have a few TMC members' phone numbers who live in the areas you are traveling in case you get in trouble and need help on the way.

SP Maristar
01-14-2013, 11:04 AM
I believe Ski Me makes a pretty good trek from Colorado to Idaho fairly often, if not annually. And he is well versed on trailer maintenance/care.

drschemel
01-14-2013, 11:10 AM
400 miles not that far but far enough to have problems.
1. Go through the trailer bearings - clean and new grease. Bearing failure is probably the most likely problem you could run into.
2. Need good trailer tires and yes, a jack and spare are nice to have.
3. Make sure lights on trailer work - don't want to be stopped by some local-yokal wanting to boost his ticket count!
4. Trailer brakes not quite as important but nice to have working.
5. As far as tow vehicle, if you don't have concerns about driving 400 miles without the trailer, you probably don't have any worries about driving with it.
6. I've never strapped my MasterCraft down. The cradle on the trailer is pretty deep and you would have to hit one heck of a bump to bounce it out, but it wouldn't hurt. You should probably use the tie downs that have springs or some kind of stretchy portion to avoid stressing the attachment points from vibrations or small bumps.
7. Along those lines, make sure the strap on your boat winch is good and consider tying a back-up line from your bow to the trailer to keep the boat solidly on the trailer.

TayMC197
01-14-2013, 11:12 AM
Make sure you have 2 spares and changing tools. It's a huge comfort knowing you have tires and can change them. Other than that, basics stuff is fine.

TayMC197
01-14-2013, 11:13 AM
Also, 400 miles isn't that far. I used to pull mine 400 miles in a weekend easily. Check tire pressures about 39 min into the trip. Check to see if the tires are hotter than normal.

NatesGr8
01-14-2013, 11:14 AM
In addition to what has been said, I keep a spare set of bearings in my trailer kit along with the necessary tools to change the bearings out in a jam (hammer, brass drift pin, blocks of wood, grease and grease gun).

bobx1
01-14-2013, 11:50 AM
.......
2. Need good trailer tires and yes, a jack and spare are nice to have.
.....

1 - Don't assume your vehicle jack will work with your trailer.
2 - Don't assume your vehicle lug wrench will work with your trailer tire.

Don't ask me how I know but let's just say, I had to leave my rig on the side of the road one time because of the above.

Sullivan
01-14-2013, 12:24 PM
Saran Wrap....in case you need to put your cover on due to rain/snow. You can use the saran wrap to wrap the boat just under the rub rail where the cover is going to move around.

If you have a tandem axle trailer its a good idea to take some wratchet style tie downs. If you blow a tire you can always just remove both wheel/tire combos from that axle and use the straps to snug the axle up under the trailer until you can get new tires.

Ski-me
01-14-2013, 12:35 PM
I think what's already been said is good advice. 400 miles isn't that bad really so just make sure your bearings are good, tires good, brakes, and a spare tire.

I would also recommend strapping the back of the boat to the trailer with some straps. Although pretty rare, if you get in an accident, you want the boat to remain on the trailer and NOT into your truck.

Thanks "SP".....I've done a lot of towing up to Idaho with a single axle without any problems. I've just switched to a double for a little more comfort towing that far. I think the advice above is great.

One last thing....if you are towing in bad weather/gravel/etc. the idea of some mudflaps is a great idea. I have not done it personally but I would love to do so in the future. Gravel can kick up and put small chips in your gelcoat.

AZDave
01-14-2013, 12:43 PM
It is a fairly new trailer. Sealed bearings. Will look at jacking points, and a jack. Thanks everyone.

GT500 MC
01-14-2013, 12:44 PM
If you have a tandem axle trailer its a good idea to take some wratchet style tie downs. If you blow a tire you can always just remove both wheel/tire combos from that axle and use the straps to snug the axle up under the trailer until you can get new tires.

Sullivan - great point on that. Never thought about it. I do a 1k mile trip each way every summer with a tandem axle. One spare. If I had to use the spare and then had another tire go bad, is that the recommended procedure--to pull the other tire on that axle and just run "single" with two tires? I'm sure I'm not the only one but sorry for the slight threadjack OP.

CruisinGA
01-14-2013, 12:56 PM
I don't tow my boat much, but I do tow a lot of other trailers...

IMO bearings and spare tire + jack, lug wrench are the #1 concern. These are by far the most likely items to leave your trailer immobile on the side of the road.

Ski-me
01-14-2013, 01:05 PM
Sullivan - great point on that. Never thought about it. I do a 1k mile trip each way every summer with a tandem axle. One spare. If I had to use the spare and then had another tire go bad, is that the recommended procedure--to pull the other tire on that axle and just run "single" with two tires? I'm sure I'm not the only one but sorry for the slight threadjack OP.

Anyone have a picture of this "fix"?? I've heard about it but have never seen it in action....:o

Dylan
01-14-2013, 01:09 PM
I'm assuming you're towing to Pacific trailer from your previous posts. Spare tire and jack sounds good. Have fun towing in CA as towing speed is 55. People go way over the speed limit, and even faster in the desert areas. Keep to the right and be proactive. I have done that drive several times you'll be fine.

zsqure
01-14-2013, 01:15 PM
Think ahead about lifting one of the axles. I've done the axle lift a few times with a skid steer trailer. Too much weight behind the axle will result in trailer sway and possibly put you in the ditch. Choose the correct one which will not cause your trailer to sway.

Sodar
01-14-2013, 01:43 PM
Sullivan - great point on that. Never thought about it. I do a 1k mile trip each way every summer with a tandem axle. One spare. If I had to use the spare and then had another tire go bad, is that the recommended procedure--to pull the other tire on that axle and just run "single" with two tires? I'm sure I'm not the only one but sorry for the slight threadjack OP.

Anyone have a picture of this "fix"?? I've heard about it but have never seen it in action....:o

You can do it, but need to make sure the axles are rated for it. IE. it does not work well on a 5,000lb boat with tandem 3500lb axles. On my 190 with leaf springs, I could do it no problem and had no issue with the tires rubbing the fenders, but on my 197 with torsion axles, the tire gets within about 1.5" of the fender at a stand still. I'd be afraid that a good bounce on the road would push the tire right into the fender. You mileage may vary...

FrankSchwab
01-14-2013, 01:45 PM
OK, I'm going to be a bit contrary.

Your most likely minor problem is losing a seat cushion out of the interior. On mine, the rear center cushion gets a jet of wind at/under it from under the windshield and it has considered leaving the boat once or twice (but fortunately never has). One advantage of trailering with a cover is you don't have to worry about this. If you have a trailerable cover, take Sullivan's suggestion of Saran Wrap for the gunnels and put the cover on - it'll keep things a lot cleaner, drier, and help keep wandering hands from exploring the stuff in your boat.

I drag my boat all over the state of Arizona without any kind of gravel guard, and I've never noticed any kind of rock ding or even mark (lots of dead bugs, but that's a different matter). I simply wouldn't worry about this issue.

Your most likely major problem is going to be a flat or blowout. Make sure that the jack you take can get under the axle with a flat tire, and (as others have suggested) that you have a lug wrench that fits the trailer lugs. On my single-axle trailer, there is no known jack in the world that will get under the axle with the tire flat, and the jack I have won't lift the frame high enough to get the wheel off the ground. Consider bringing along enough foot-long lengths of 2x6 that you could create a ramp with them, place them in front of the trailer wheel, and then pull the trailer up on them to create enough space under the axle that your jack will fit.

Second major possible problem will be bearings. After the first 30 miles and then every time you stop for gas, put your hand on the hub. It'll be warm, perhaps uncomfortably so (120 degrees perhaps), but if you leave any skin behind or end up with blisters, somethings terribly wrong and you need to fix it before you go anywhere else. It's likely either brakes or bearings, but you don't want to pull it any further until you find out which and resolve their issues. Buying one of the inexpensive infrared thermometers like this (http://www.harborfreight.com/non-contact-laser-thermometer-96451.html)will keep your hands clean (and unblistered) when you do this check.

ALWAYS, ALWAYS use rear tie-downs, and make them tight. If you don't believe me, simply drive behind an untied boat on a rough road - the boat will be bouncing 2" off the bunks and slamming back down. You want the boat and the trailer to be a single unit moving together, not two independent units bashing each other. The boat isn't going to bounce off the trailer going down the road unless you're in an accident, the straps are there to prevent that pounding - and to keep the boat and trailer together in case of the aforementioned accident.

Don't drive too fast - higher speeds cause drastically higher tire temperatures and likelihood of failure. Make sure the tires are inflated to max sidewall pressure (cold), drive the speed limit or below, and your day will be a lot less stressful.

mikeg205
01-14-2013, 01:55 PM
OK, I'm going to be a bit contrary.


Second major possible problem will be bearings. After the first 30 miles and then every time you stop for gas, put your hand on the hub. It'll be warm, perhaps uncomfortably so (120 degrees perhaps), but if you leave any skin behind or end up with blisters, somethings terribly wrong and you need to fix it before you go anywhere else. It's likely either brakes or bearings, but you don't want to pull it any further until you find out which and resolve their issues. Buying one of the inexpensive infrared thermometers like this (http://www.harborfreight.com/non-contact-laser-thermometer-96451.html)will keep your hands clean (and unblistered) when you do this check.

ALWAYS, ALWAYS use rear tie-downs, and make them tight. If you don't believe me, simply drive behind an untied boat on a rough road - the boat will be bouncing 2" off the bunks and slamming back down. You want the boat and the trailer to be a single unit moving together, not two independent units bashing each other. The boat isn't going to bounce off the trailer going down the road unless you're in an accident, the straps are there to prevent that pounding - and to keep the boat and trailer together in case of the aforementioned accident.

Don't drive too fast - higher speeds cause drastically higher tire temperatures and likelihood of failure. Make sure the tires are inflated to max sidewall pressure (cold), drive the speed limit or below, and your day will be a lot less stressful.

X2 on checking hubs. I always inspect the bearings before a long trip... Takes all of 20 minutes....and also to the temp test on the hubs..

Regarding not tying down the boat...their are liability issues it your boat leaves your trailer and it was not properly secured.

TxsRiverRat
01-14-2013, 01:57 PM
I'm not planning to tow my boat without something like this:

http://www.rvlifestyles.net/p-228426-tri-leveler.aspx?magic=J6VBVZ0925114916497&affiliateid=10510

Ski-me
01-14-2013, 02:04 PM
I'm not planning to tow my boat without something like this:

http://www.rvlifestyles.net/p-228426-tri-leveler.aspx?magic=J6VBVZ0925114916497&affiliateid=10510

Is 4" tall enough?

TxsRiverRat
01-14-2013, 02:04 PM
I think so...

I need to see the unit in person...

Sodar
01-14-2013, 02:19 PM
http://www.traileraid.com/product_images/o/147/23__88295_zoom.jpg

I have one of these and use it when I fill the boat with fuel, so it does not burb up all over me.

TxsRiverRat
01-14-2013, 02:54 PM
how does that keep it from burping all over u?

Sodar
01-14-2013, 03:02 PM
I use it to get the filler neck/vent higher than the rest of the tank. It's helped tremendously and lets me get another couple gallons in the tank.

TxsRiverRat
01-14-2013, 03:23 PM
I use it to get the filler neck/vent higher than the rest of the tank. It's helped tremendously and lets me get another couple gallons in the tank.

Hmmmmm interesting - What lift does that trailer aid give u?

What I'm trying to do is have something with me for my single axle trailer when I have a flat, because I cant get the trailer jacked up high enough with the axle on the ground.

Sodar
01-14-2013, 03:24 PM
It gives me 4"

Table Rocker
01-14-2013, 03:34 PM
Hmmmmm interesting - What lift does that trailer aid give u?

What I'm trying to do is have something with me for my single axle trailer when I have a flat, because I cant get the trailer jacked up high enough with the axle on the ground.If you put your jack under the axle, you should be good. The scissor jack that comes with most trucks would probably work. If you don't already have one, they are cheap and plentiful.

FrankSchwab
01-14-2013, 04:21 PM
A Scissor jack isn't low enough to go under the axle on my single-axle trailer. I have the 5000 pound axle (six lugs), and it hangs much lower than the center of the wheel.

You definitely need something like the previous two linked ramps to get the wheel up high enough to get the jack under the axle.

Tristarboarder
01-14-2013, 04:42 PM
Unfortunately I have to drive 1 hour each way on the freeway to get to the Columbia River in Central WA, so to protect my boat from several rock chips and dings, I had a rock guard custom built for when I travel. There are several of these on the market, including Rock Tamer which are pretty nice. I had this one built that has a guard extend all the way across to ensure nothing gets through. Works like a charm!

Table Rocker
01-14-2013, 05:21 PM
A Scissor jack isn't low enough to go under the axle on my single-axle trailer. I have the 5000 pound axle (six lugs), and it hangs much lower than the center of the wheel.

You definitely need something like the previous two linked ramps to get the wheel up high enough to get the jack under the axle.
I've got an old scissor jack like this one:
http://images.craigslist.org/3Ea3J43N35G65Ha5J9d1ca33865f7aab9158c.jpg
It's 4" high in the saddle and my axle (5000# 6-lug) is about 6.5" off the ground (with air in the tires). I figure in my worst case scenario I could jack from more of a central location, put something under the axle or wheel and move the jack outboard. I hope it would work that way, I haven't had to try it yet. I know I am pushing my luck, note the brand name on the tire below!

TxsRiverRat
01-14-2013, 06:16 PM
If you put your jack under the axle, you should be good. The scissor jack that comes with most trucks would probably work. If you don't already have one, they are cheap and plentiful.

When I have had a flat, neither of my jacks have been able to help me. I need to get the axle off the ground in order to get my 2 ton jack under the axle :/

drschemel
01-14-2013, 08:38 PM
http://www.mastercraft.com/teamtalk/picture.php?albumid=802&pictureid=4885
Not to hijack the thread, but several have advocated stern tie-downs. I understand the concept, but my Tristar doesn't have anything on hte stern to toe to that wouldn't drape across the swim deck. Ideas?

1993bluestarsnstripes
01-14-2013, 08:51 PM
AZDave: Just as a suggestion, you could have it shrink wrapped. That keeps everthing from flying out the boat and protects the gel coat. Rather than towing your boat 400 miles, you could just sell it to me. LOL! It's just what I've been looking for, a red '93. Oh well, keep me in mind! joeski1157@yahoo.com

1993bluestarsnstripes
01-14-2013, 09:14 PM
AZDave: Just as a suggestion, you could have it shrink wrapped. That keeps everthing from flying out the boat and protects the gel coat. Rather than towing your boat 400 miles, you could just sell it to me. LOL! It's just what I've been looking for, a red '93. Oh well, keep me in mind! joeski1157@yahoo.com

FrankSchwab
01-14-2013, 09:18 PM
Table Rocker -
How far is it from the ground to the rim? Subtract that from 6.5", and you'll have a good idea of the clearance you'll have when your tire blows, and the clearance that you'll have to stuff the jack into. I have a similar scissors jack, and it wouldn't fit underneath (on an asphalt surface) last year when I lost a tire.

bsloop
01-14-2013, 10:20 PM
400 miles not a huge tow but it is significant enough to do proper prep. Repack bearings, bleed brakes and replace tires if more than 5 yrs old. Tires can look great but break down with sun and lack of movement will weaken the sidewall. This is a major cause of failure. A tire failure that takes out the fender or damages the boat is exponentially more expensive than a couple new tires.

A jack and jack stand is more versitle than those ramps IMO. Can jack the frame enough to brace then place jack under the axle. Two chunks of 4x4 is also a useful as either a tire chalk or spacer.

Not surprised a bow tie down has not been mentioned. The recovery strap is NOT a tie down, it pulls horizontal. A separate ratchet strap going from the bow eye straight down to the frame makes a significant difference.
Transom tie downs will keep the back from moving. A gunwale strap is unnecessary if tie downs are properly positioned and will not hold the boat in an extreme situation anyway.

I would not trailer with a full cover unless moisture was expected. It is hard to the cover and boat. If so, slow down significantly.

Table Rocker
01-14-2013, 10:57 PM
Table Rocker -
How far is it from the ground to the rim? Subtract that from 6.5", and you'll have a good idea of the clearance you'll have when your tire blows, and the clearance that you'll have to stuff the jack into. I have a similar scissors jack, and it wouldn't fit underneath (on an asphalt surface) last year when I lost a tire.Yea, I might have to pull it up on a rock or something to get clearance. It's always something. I was carrying a big bottle jack every time I towed, but I would still need to block up to get to the frame with enough lift left to get the tire off the ground. I was carrying a floor jack along before that, but got tired of the hassle. I love being able to use a Hi-Lift jack on my utility (car hauler) trailer, but don't want to use it on the boat trailer for fear of scraping everything up. I guess keeping the tires in good shape is the best solution, but even then stuff happens.

On the long distance towing issue: I started getting worried about my windshield last year after a good sized rock went sailing over the car and boat from on oncoming dump truck. I am planning on making kind of a cockpit cover that just goes over the windshield and has a rubber mat in it. I was thinking of rubber like you put in the bottom of the drawers in a roll-away too chest. Just the thought of having to try and replace a windshield has me thinking it needs some protection. Has anybody done anything similar?

Rockman
01-14-2013, 11:01 PM
I used one of those scissor jacks once to change the right rear tire on my buddy's Tahoe. That was the jack provided in the truck. We jacked the truck up and about 30 seconds later, the jack broke and the truck came right back down on the ground. Luckily neither one of us was hurt.

My buddy called the dealership where he bought the truck (was only 6 months old) and they replaced the jack for free...with the SAME type jack. :rant:

I do not trailer anything without taking my 3 ton hydraulic jack in the truck...I can change a flat tire on the side of an expressway in a matter of minutes...the 3 ton works fine for my 2500HD and any boat we have trailered...

Chred
01-14-2013, 11:02 PM
I use Rock Tamers when ever I tow anything of value especially my boat!!

As far as tie downs, I saw a boat sitting on the highway this past summer! I didn't think they could jump off the bunks till I saw it first hand. I think traveling with the cover on would be the least of your worries if it jumped off the trailer and dragged down the highway for a few hundred yards. Ouch

Drive safe.

DooSPX
01-15-2013, 01:11 AM
I drag my boat all over the state of Arizona without any kind of gravel guard, and I've never noticed any kind of rock ding or even mark (lots of dead bugs, but that's a different matter). I simply wouldn't worry about this issue.


I have to say you are lucky. I towed my boat from WV to FL and when I made it to FL I had a lot of chips in the gel from gravel and what not. I had to have them all professionally touched up, because they were through the color layer of gel. Never towing long distances again with out mud flaps. Even had a large rock fly up and take a nice slice from the top of the bow. I watched that in slow motion in my rear view.

Sullivan
01-15-2013, 10:00 AM
Same here, I even find rocks inside the boat. I also tow with two sets of mud flaps, one set are the rock tamers.

DooSPX
01-15-2013, 10:12 AM
Sullivan, care to share about your mud flaps? I am looking into some, or have some made.

Ski-me
01-15-2013, 10:38 AM
Doo, I also have gotten a few chips from my travels. I'm considering some for next summer too. This is what I was thinking.....

http://mudflaps.com/i-7945642-rock-tamers-00108-hitch-mud-flap-system-forged-black.html?gclid=CJqvqN3J6rQCFcKPPAod2lwAnw

Sullivan
01-15-2013, 11:41 AM
88740

thatsmrmastercraft
01-15-2013, 12:13 PM
For those of us with aggressive tires, flaps are a must. I'm considering running a second set of tires and wheels through the summer mainly for this reason. Plus I can pick up 1 or 2 mpg with some mild tread design tires. Certainly not the cheapest route, but I might know a guy who can hook me up.:rolleyes:

Ski-me
01-15-2013, 12:49 PM
For those of us with aggressive tires, flaps are a must. I'm considering running a second set of tires and wheels through the summer mainly for this reason. Plus I can pick up 1 or 2 mpg with some mild tread design tires. Certainly not the cheapest route, but I might know a guy who can hook me up.:rolleyes:

It's good to be the King! ;)

I'm sure I could save some gas too but then my truck would look Soooo whimpy! :(

thatsmrmastercraft
01-15-2013, 12:56 PM
It's good to be the King! ;)

I'm sure I could save some gas too but then my truck would look Soooo whimpy! :(

Not with the correct sized tires and wheels.

1993bluestarsnstripes
01-15-2013, 03:28 PM
AZDave, Just as a suggestion, you could have the boat shrink wrapped. That would protect the gel coat and keep things from flying out while traveling (ie rear seat, front cusions, etc.) Just as a side note: I've been looking for a red '93, so keep me in mind. joeski1157@yahoo.com

JohnE
01-15-2013, 03:57 PM
Not to hijack the thread, but several have advocated stern tie-downs. I understand the concept, but my Tristar doesn't have anything on hte stern to toe to that wouldn't drape across the swim deck. Ideas?

I'd use the eyes that are above the swim platform and just wrap around the edge and tie to the trailer.

Muttley
01-15-2013, 06:04 PM
Lots of great advice I won't repeat. One I didn't see:

Whenever you stop, touch the hubs on the wheels. If it's really hot, you have a problem.

Other than what others have said, gas up & p before you go.

thatsmrmastercraft
01-15-2013, 06:10 PM
Lots of great advice I won't repeat. One I didn't see:

Whenever you stop, touch the hubs on the wheels. If it's really hot, you have a problem.

Other than what others have said, gas up & p before you go.

Good point on hub temps. Any time I tow the boat and stop, I make sure to walk around the back end of the boat and check tires, hubs, trailer connector, wiring connection and safety chains.

AZDave
01-15-2013, 06:27 PM
Not quite ready to sell it yet...I got a new spare, have another spare, 2 year old tires, tie downs, jack and a lug wrench. The weather forecast is good. Just getting 12 foot bunks and another crossmember, not a fun boat trip. Temp here is in the 20's at night, so I think this is a good time to finish this project.

zsqure
01-16-2013, 01:54 PM
Watch out for semi tire caps that have peeled off the tire. I was in the wrong lane at the wrong time. Kicked it up. Hit the fender, lucky it glanced off and there were only black marks that I was able to rub off.

thatsmrmastercraft
01-16-2013, 03:58 PM
Watch out for semi tire caps that have peeled off the tire. I was in the wrong lane at the wrong time. Kicked it up. Hit the fender, lucky it glanced off and there were only black marks that I was able to rub off.

There are alligators everywhere.......not just down south.

Bouyhead
01-16-2013, 08:53 PM
We tow my buddies boat from NY to FL & back every spring. We do all the stuff that was mentioned earlier but instead of spare bearings and races he carries a spare hub assembly.

wheelerd
01-17-2013, 01:50 AM
My experience has been that an automotive scissor or bottle jack is often not hefty enough for a boat or travel trailer. With a vehicle you're typically just lifting one corner. With a trailer you're lifting the whole side of the unit, ie. much more weight.

I carry one of these in my Yukon since I often tow a 28' travel trailer as well.
http://www.basspro.com/Quick-Change-Trailer-Jack/product/9071/
You just wedge it under the axle, pull forward a bit, and the jack rotates under the axle and lifts it up. I place a chunk of old carpet between the jack and the axle so it doesn't scratch the axle.

FrankSchwab
01-17-2013, 02:16 AM
I've seen those, but was never sure they actually worked. Have you had to use yours?

wheelerd
01-17-2013, 03:29 AM
I've never needed it on the road but I've tried it out at home to make sure it worked. On soft ground I would image that it might need something under it like a chunk of 2 x 4 or plywood since it has a small footprint.

Voodoo
01-17-2013, 08:43 AM
My experience has been that an automotive scissor or bottle jack is often not hefty enough for a boat or travel trailer. With a vehicle you're typically just lifting one corner. With a trailer you're lifting the whole side of the unit, ie. much more weight.

I carry one of these in my Yukon since I often tow a 28' travel trailer as well.
http://www.basspro.com/Quick-Change-Trailer-Jack/product/9071/
You just wedge it under the axle, pull forward a bit, and the jack rotates under the axle and lifts it up. I place a chunk of old carpet between the jack and the axle so it doesn't scratch the axle.

I guess things weigh differently in Canada (sun angle, gravitational force, maple syrup ratio, or some such thing), but my Craftsman $19.99 2 ton bottle jack somehow manages to lift my boat and trailer, which have a combined weight of 2700 lbs -- it's a mystery to me, eh.

voodoo

wheelerd
01-17-2013, 11:05 AM
I guess things weigh differently in Canada (sun angle, gravitational force, maple syrup ratio, or some such thing), but my Craftsman $19.99 2 ton bottle jack somehow manages to lift my boat and trailer, which have a combined weight of 2700 lbs -- it's a mystery to me, eh.

voodoo

Must be the maple syrup.;)
Yes, after-market bottle jacks come in various sizes and capacities and certainly a 2-ton jack might work. I know however that the OEM one that comes with my Yukon really works hard to lift my boat trailer axle and is a total loss with my travel trailer. Maybe some factory ones are sturdy -- mine is just wimpy.