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View Full Version : Bow Eye Tension when NOT in Use....


broncotw
11-13-2012, 03:49 PM
I have been told from others (and a few dealerships) that when the boat is not being towed and sitting on the trailer to loosen the tension from the strap from the winch to the bow eye -- thus relieving the constant tension on the bow eye....

I have gotten into the habit of doing this for both of my boats....

I was curious if any others members also do this?

mzimme
11-13-2012, 03:52 PM
I did when I put it away for the winter. Not when I used it every weekend though.

MattsCraft
11-13-2012, 03:57 PM
Always, know one ever told me to do so, just seemed like a good idea. Just remember to tighten back up when you hook up the trailer to the truck:D

jhall0711
11-13-2012, 04:00 PM
I always take the tension off the bow eye when I put it away after use. Just a habit I picked up as well. I also take the tension off my transom straps as well.

Forrest-X45
11-13-2012, 04:02 PM
I do as well. Loosen the bow strap and transom straps if not being towed. Just seemed logical to me.

gts-20
11-13-2012, 04:16 PM
My father told me about this 36 years ago with our first boat, a 1977 Wellcraft. I was 5 years old. Lol! Been doing it ever since.

thatsmrmastercraft
11-13-2012, 04:17 PM
Makes sense. Anyone have a failsafe to keep from hitting the road with the boat unsecured like most of us do with our plugs?

mzimme
11-13-2012, 04:20 PM
Makes sense. Anyone have a failsafe to keep from hitting the road with the boat unsecured like most of us do with our plugs?

Put a wheel chock in front of your trailer tire. ;)

jhall0711
11-13-2012, 04:21 PM
Makes sense. Anyone have a failsafe to keep from hitting the road with the boat unsecured like most of us do with our plugs?

Not failsafe, but it is the next things i do after hooking up trailer... Ball latch, chains, lights, straps.

thatsmrmastercraft
11-13-2012, 04:23 PM
Put a wheel chock in front of your trailer tire. ;)

Thanks Mike.

BrooksfamX2
11-13-2012, 04:42 PM
I do and always have........

Thrall
11-13-2012, 04:54 PM
Same here, but my transom starps aren't "that" tight since they're not the ratcheting type so I typically leave them.
The bow strap on the other hand cranks the boat nose down at least 1/2" so I know it's putting some stress on the bow eye.
The bow eye strap, I release it and then crank it back snug in case I forget, but as hard as this pig is to slide on and off the trailer I don't think I could launch it off the back of the trailer if my truck had 1000hp on takeoff!

wheelerd
11-13-2012, 04:56 PM
I have been told from others (and a few dealerships) that when the boat is not being towed and sitting on the trailer to loosen the tension from the strap from the winch to the bow eye -- thus relieving the constant tension on the bow eye....

I have gotten into the habit of doing this for both of my boats....

I was curious if any others members also do this?

It begs the question, what's wrong with constant tension on the bow eye? Is that necessarily a bad thing? I don't think there's a danger the bow eye will pull out. If you can winch a 3000 lb boat a couple feet or more onto a trailer using the bow eye, and then haul it down the road with varying pressure on the bow eye, I don't think sitting in the driveway with constant tension on it will hurt anything.

east tx skier
11-13-2012, 05:02 PM
Never thought about doing that. I may start. Then again, it seems like something I would forget to redo before taking the boat on a ride. But I guess that's what the safety chain is for.

thatsmrmastercraft
11-13-2012, 05:12 PM
Never thought about doing that. I may start. Then again, it seems like something I would forget to redo before taking the boat on a ride. But I guess that's what the safety chain is for.

I'm thinking Thrall has the answer to take the tension off but not leave it hanging loose. any time I have ever towed a boat with a loose bow strap, I have noticed the bow moving up and down, so I think I will adopt this practice as well. It really appeals to my MCOCD. I presume it would do well for your CCOCD Doug.

east tx skier
11-13-2012, 05:37 PM
I'm thinking Thrall has the answer to take the tension off but not leave it hanging loose. any time I have ever towed a boat with a loose bow strap, I have noticed the bow moving up and down, so I think I will adopt this practice as well. It really appeals to my MCOCD. I presume it would do well for your CCOCD Doug.

Probably. But I assume that the CC bow eye, like the lifting rings, is suitable to withstand the weight of the world. ;)

mikeg205
11-13-2012, 06:02 PM
dang, now I got to think about this... ;) never thought of this...makes sense...but just another thing to add to the checklist.

jhall0711
11-13-2012, 06:13 PM
It begs the question, what's wrong with constant tension on the bow eye? Is that necessarily a bad thing? I don't think there's a danger the bow eye will pull out. If you can winch a 3000 lb boat a couple feet or more onto a trailer using the bow eye, and then haul it down the road with varying pressure on the bow eye, I don't think sitting in the driveway with constant tension on it will hurt anything.

I pulled one through on my old Supra. Granted I understand it is a different quality build, but that was all I needed to see in order to make this a habbit. I highly doubt it would pull through on my MC.... but with a prior bad experience, I feel the less stress the better. Also keeping in mind my MC is almost as old as I am. :D

GoneBoatN
11-13-2012, 06:33 PM
It begs the question, what's wrong with constant tension on the bow eye? Is that necessarily a bad thing? I don't think there's a danger the bow eye will pull out. If you can winch a 3000 lb boat a couple feet or more onto a trailer using the bow eye, and then haul it down the road with varying pressure on the bow eye, I don't think sitting in the driveway with constant tension on it will hurt anything.

I think it is more to lengthen the life of the strap itself.

Since the strap does not keep the bow from bouncing (at least not in my case) on the roller as I travel down the road, I also run a strap (ratcheting) through the bow eye and around the trailer frame to hold the bow down better.

I loosen all straps after trailering and tighten before. It has become my habit to do a walk around and check everything before getting behind the wheel. Confession of a sinner: One time I left the trailer jack down but fortunately I notice the weird noise and stopped after just a very short distance.

MattsCraft
11-13-2012, 07:21 PM
Agree, don't really know if it is doing anything, just hate seeing it pinched tight against the boat buddy (now don't turn this thread into that discussion:D) my thought was more around stress cracks/fractures, but again if this was the case, could happen when trailer-ing. I just release it a few clicks and then put the leaver back into the tighten/crank up position, this way if I ever forget or somebody else happens to hook up the boat (that will be unlikely, unless I die, lol) it would only drop back an inch or so.

Hey could be a good theft deterrent, guy tries to steal my boat, does a Don Garlits (Dating Myself) burn out and leaves the boat on the drive way. Trashed the out gear, lost the trailer, but hey I still have my boat:rolleyes:

Red 08 Xstar
11-14-2012, 12:12 AM
No, what would be the point??

wheelerd
11-14-2012, 01:38 AM
Hey could be a good theft deterrent, guy tries to steal my boat, does a Don Garlits (Dating Myself) burn out and leaves the boat on the drive way. Trashed the out gear, lost the trailer, but hey I still have my boat:rolleyes:

Ya, I saw Big Daddy Garlits run a couple of times back in the 70s.

bcd
11-14-2012, 08:44 AM
I would have to disagree and say you are actually doing more damage to release the tension and then crank it back down before towing again. From a fatigue standpoint (slowly failing the eyehook by repeated loading, not a one type overload failure), it is overall strain damage or cycles that cause failure. Everytime you crank down on your eyehook, you apply load onto the eyehook, which "stretches" the eyehook and causes a cycle of fatigue "damage". You then drive down the road and hit bumps which cause increases and decreases in the loading, which result in smaller cycles of "damage". If you get home and release the eyehook load, and then crank it back down again, you just added another cycle of damage. Holding the eyehook under a constant load (sitting in your garage still cranked down tight) does no further damage to the eyehook. Fatigue failures happen after the overall amount of strain "damage" is too much for the material to handle. The largest "damage" cycles are the ones with the greatest change in load, which would be cranking the boat down tight.

Sullivan
11-14-2012, 08:52 AM
It must be winter time if this is the kind of stuff you guys are talking about. And its just the beginning of winter.

willyt
11-14-2012, 08:55 AM
this may just be my boat specifically (2007 xstar), but i always release the tension as well - but my bow stays right where it was on the trailer. Never thought about this from a bow-eye perspective, i was just trying to lengthen the life of the strap

thatsmrmastercraft
11-14-2012, 09:44 AM
I would have to disagree and say you are actually doing more damage to release the tension and then crank it back down before towing again. From a fatigue standpoint (slowly failing the eyehook by repeated loading, not a one type overload failure), it is overall strain damage or cycles that cause failure. Everytime you crank down on your eyehook, you apply load onto the eyehook, which "stretches" the eyehook and causes a cycle of fatigue "damage". You then drive down the road and hit bumps which cause increases and decreases in the loading, which result in smaller cycles of "damage". If you get home and release the eyehook load, and then crank it back down again, you just added another cycle of damage. Holding the eyehook under a constant load (sitting in your garage still cranked down tight) does no further damage to the eyehook. Fatigue failures happen after the overall amount of strain "damage" is too much for the material to handle. The largest "damage" cycles are the ones with the greatest change in load, which would be cranking the boat down tight.

I think the concern has to do with the strain on the glass around the bow eye would what one would want to protect. I really don't imagine that anyone is seriously thinking that their bow eye is in danger of stretching and breaking. But I'm not a metallurgist, I'm just a salesman.

bcd
11-14-2012, 10:08 AM
I think the concern has to do with the strain on the glass around the bow eye would what one would want to protect. I really don't imagine that anyone is seriously thinking that their bow eye is in danger of stretching and breaking. But I'm not a metallurgist, I'm just a salesman.

When I said eyehook, I was referring to whole eyehook area, including the fiberglass as the area of concern. Sorry, I wasn't very clear. The same issues would affect both the fiberglass and the metal hook, but obviously, the glass would be the weaker of the two.

mikeg205
11-14-2012, 10:34 AM
. But I'm not a metallurgist, I'm just a salesman.



....thread jack.... just a salesman?!!! pshaw...it's one of the greatest professions....when done well...and I assume you do it well....

point of reference...what do you call a medical student who graduates last from the lowest ranked medical school? -

Most of the leadership in this country and my state (Illinois) when to IVY League or some other highly ranked university...

So never just a salesman.... :D :D :D

thatsmrmastercraft
11-14-2012, 11:25 AM
....thread jack.... just a salesman?!!! pshaw...it's one of the greatest professions....when done well...and I assume you do it well....

point of reference...what do you call a medical student who graduates last from the lowest ranked medical school? -

Most of the leadership in this country and my state (Illinois) when to IVY League or some other highly ranked university...

So never just a salesman.... :D :D :D

That was a little "tongue in cheek", but thanks for the vote of confidence. At least it's not the oldest profession...............well, I guess it is at that.:rolleyes:

GoneBoatN
11-15-2012, 12:01 PM
It must be winter time if this is the kind of stuff you guys are talking about. And its just the beginning of winter.


:popcorn::popcorn::popcorn:

wheelerd
11-15-2012, 04:30 PM
It must be winter time if this is the kind of stuff you guys are talking about. And its just the beginning of winter.

Wait until the depths of winter in mid-January! Who knows what the topic of conversation will be?
Best way to polish the throttle knob . . .
The merits of DOT4 vs. DOT5 brake fluid . . .
How to detail your license plate . . .
:firejump::firejump:

mikeg205
11-15-2012, 05:14 PM
Wait until the depths of winter in mid-January! Who knows what the topic of conversation will be?
Best way to polish the throttle knob . . .
The merits of DOT4 vs. DOT5 brake fluid . . .
How to detail your license plate . . .
:firejump::firejump:

you don't detail your license plate? :D

wheelerd
11-15-2012, 05:33 PM
you don't detail your license plate? :D

OMG. I knew I was a failure as a MC owner. That explains why I can't nail a 720 upty, downy, spin-around, super-duper thingy on my board.

mikeg205
11-15-2012, 08:08 PM
maybe we should start a problem with my thingy thread....lol :D