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Hatch7
10-11-2012, 12:03 PM
The boat is in a new location on the lift for the winter this year and mechanic of the last 13 years is nowhere close. I am debating on winterizing myself for the first time or finding someone new. Any comments on finding a good MC mechanic in general - specifically near Oconee/Sinclair GA vs doing it myself? Time is the big issue in doing it myself.

homer12
10-11-2012, 12:35 PM
I'm sure a lot of people on here would say do it yourself, I would. There is more than enough info on this site to help you and plus, you get to know your boat better and the satisfaction of doing it yourself and correctly.

east tx skier
10-11-2012, 02:58 PM
Do it yourself. These checklists were written while staring at a 93 Pro Star and an owner's manual for a 93 Pro Star.


Winterization Checklist (http://www.tylerskiclub.com/winterization.html)

Dewinterization Checklist (http://www.tylerskiclub.com/dewinterization.html)

Cloaked
10-11-2012, 05:12 PM
The boat is in a new location on the lift for the winter this year and mechanic of the last 13 years is nowhere close. I am debating on winterizing myself for the first time or finding someone new. Any comments on finding a good MC mechanic in general - specifically near Oconee/Sinclair GA vs doing it myself? Time is the big issue in doing it myself.
It can be done in an hour or less. I have it down to about 20 minutes but I do not fill with anti-freeze. Fogging is optional but I like to fog. Takes maybe 1 minute to choke the engine. Remove four drain plugs and two hoses. Time-wise you're done. Extra time? Change the oil. Engine oil will still be warm from fogging. Filter is right there for easy access (three minutes or less). Stabilize the fuel. Takes maybe 30 seconds to pour 16 oz. in a half full tank (15 gal). Freezing is now no concern. Extra time? Put the battery on a Battery Tender and come back next spring.

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Hatch7
10-12-2012, 10:41 AM
Thanks for all your replies - great advice and a great forum! Now planning to winterize in the next month. Printed the checklist and have one more question - so far.

I have the Holley carb - planning to fill the block with anti-freeze and leave for the winter. So any thoughts on how best to protect the carb - I'm not planning to start the engine until spring with the dewinterizing.
thanks

east tx skier
10-12-2012, 10:59 AM
Thanks for all your replies - great advice and a great forum! Now planning to winterize in the next month. Printed the checklist and have one more question - so far.

I have the Holley carb - planning to fill the block with anti-freeze and leave for the winter. So any thoughts on how best to protect the carb - I'm not planning to start the engine until spring with the dewinterizing.
thanks

Just treat your fuel with marine stabil, and fog the carb. I suppose you could drain the fuel, but I never bothered to do that. It should be fine.

The way that checklist is laid out is to be sure that you have the stabilizer in before you are running your engine to bring it up to temp for the oil change. The fogging is after the oil change because, presumably, you are going to run it a bit afterward to circulate the fresh oil a bit. So you would fog before the final shut down.

Of course, if you are going to add antifreeze, wait to fog until you have drained the block, replugged it, and are sucking up antifreeze with the hose. Don't suck antifreeze into a block that hasn't been drained. RV antifreeze isn't supposed to be mixed with water.

Ski-me
10-12-2012, 11:11 AM
Don't suck antifreeze into a block that hasn't been drained. RV antifreeze isn't supposed to be mixed with water.

Why is this?? Antifreeze and RV Antifreeze will cetainly mix with "some" water.....

east tx skier
10-12-2012, 11:27 AM
EG antifreeze needs to be mixed with water to activate the corrosion inhibitors. PG antifreeze, at least the stuff I use, says it can be used with no water added. I don't know if that means it should not be diluted.

With that in mind, I guess I would have to ask, how much is "some" water and at what point do you know when that acceptable ratio has been reached? I'm not saying someone with enough experience couldn't make it work with "some" water. However, I think that would require running a lot of antifreeze through the system to ensure uniformity, and, then, testing the freezing point of what's coming out. Seems a bit complicated to me.

So, when making recommendations to someone who has never done this before, I think the best policy is to tell them to drain and refill, thus, assuring that they don't end up disappointed with a smoothie in the block come spring. Plus, you will use less antifreeze if you don't have to wait for the diluted stuff to pass through the system. Further, there will be much less to collect if you drain first.

Of course, I have it easy since I can just pour 3 gallons in through the Tstat on my PCM engine and be done with it.

east tx skier
10-12-2012, 11:57 AM
................... Duplicate .....................

GoneBoatN
10-12-2012, 12:04 PM
The boat is in a new location on the lift for the winter this year and mechanic of the last 13 years is nowhere close. I am debating on winterizing myself for the first time or finding someone new. Any comments on finding a good MC mechanic in general - specifically near Oconee/Sinclair GA vs doing it myself? Time is the big issue in doing it myself.

Although I would also advocate winterizing yourself, I would say take the time to learn to do it correctly. By this I mean it is well worth the time doing some research, including using this forum, to decide how you feel it to be best accomplished given your boat under your conditions. Your first time through winterization will take you longer. IMHO, worth the time invested.

If you are not going to invest the time, find a new marine mechanic that you trust. Given the lakes in your area, there has got to be some nearby.

Also consider what other work your mechanic might have performed at that same time. Did he also do a tune-up during winterization?

mikeg205
10-12-2012, 12:39 PM
Winterization is the least part of what I do in the off season. Easttx and Gone...have great advice... I'll be posting what I did today on another thread... I take off the motor box and inspect and clean things you would pay a small fortune for. I inspect my risers every season - boat 17yrs old...and check water pathways in exhaust manifolds and risers...then I can also inspect the exhaust hoses. You can also then inspect fuel lines, shaft alignment...etc.

I use EastTx's checklist - just to check things off...

east tx skier
10-12-2012, 02:28 PM
My list is more winterization and annual maintenance. The dewinterization list is more annual maintenance than dewinterization. Dewinterization doesn't involve more than charging the battery.

Bizz238
10-12-2012, 09:02 PM
Bought a 92 PS190 in 2008 and I've been winterizing and dewinterizing it myself since... My advice to Hatch7 is use ''east tx skier'' lists and hints... They're very accurate.

St-Jerome, Quebec, Canada

sxerob
10-24-2012, 12:42 PM
Hey Guys,

I have an '84 S&S. Does this list work well for that boat as well?

east tx skier
10-24-2012, 04:08 PM
It will work with either. Just remember the plug on the j tube since yours is a PCM. Also, you need to remove the water pump to change the impelled. Be sure to mark the pump orientation before you remove it. They can easily be reinstalled upside-down.