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View Full Version : probably need new bunks-- where to get carpet? any special treatment for wood?


strad
10-03-2012, 12:13 PM
This project started out as loose bunk fasteners. I bought new ones but they are not threading in the way I would like. The wood looks dried out as well.

It appears to be just 2x8, and what is on there has not been treated or protected in any way -- it's just normal wood like used in framing houses. So the question is, is that good enough or should I be treating the wood beforehand, or should I be buying treated wood?

And where should I get, and what kind of, bunk carpet? And how to fasten it onto the wood?

My plan is to have the whole thing pre-assembled, drop the boat in the water, and then swap out the old bunks for the new. That part should be easy.

This is a 1984 VM trailer supporting a 1984 S & S in case it matters.

east tx skier
10-03-2012, 12:30 PM
Just regular treated pine will be fine. I use the olefin marine carpet from Home Depot or Lowes. I put one strip over the top of the bunk and another layer wrapped all the way around. Stainless staples and hardware. No glue.

TxsRiverRat
10-03-2012, 01:05 PM
I bought nice pre-treated wood because I want it to last a long time, even if I had to recarpet.. I bought carpet at West Marine.

You can not have it all set up in advance.

The only part you can set up in advance is the length of the wood and the length of the carpet. If I were you, I would buy all new bolts, nuts and lock washers and throw away the old ones. Once you take off the old bunks, you can put the new bunk down to measure for the holes to drill. You’ll need to countersink them so the boat can never scrape through in the event of any potential carpet issues. Once you get the new bunk bolted in, then you can attach the carpet to it. Start at the front end and use a staple gun to secure it. stretch both sides tight and staple it on the bottom edge all the way down. but make sure its very tight.

For the “V,” I used a hot glue gun to attach.

TxsRiverRat
10-03-2012, 01:06 PM
forgot to mention, you have to remove the boat from the trailer to do this, so make it a work party and have some working on the carpet and some skiing... and alternate. :)

strad
10-03-2012, 03:18 PM
Lol Ok, so I'm guessing that the (very) rusty drill screws (1/4-14 x 1 1/2") that are currently holding the bunks on is NOT the way it should be. Not knowing any better I would have put the new bunks on the same way -- which is why I thought it could be pre-assembled!

So bolts in from the top, countersunk and with a washer, and washer and locking nut on from the bottom. And then one layer of marine carpet the width of the board, stapled down, and then another layer of marine carpet wrapped around the bunk and stapled from the bottom.

Cary K.
10-03-2012, 03:32 PM
Sounds about right to me. One thing I would do on the first layer of carpet, is to wrap it far enough on the sides that all the staples were in the side of the bunk, not the top. Then wrap another whole layer of carpet over that.

Thrall
10-03-2012, 04:09 PM
I've seen lag screws used, but personally I wouldn't want to do that.
Thru bolt with carriage bolts is preferred.
When I re-did my bunks, I went ahead and pre-cut and carpeted them.
After getting the boat off the trailer I used the old bunks to get a layout for the bolts since the new boards wouldn't just lay flat on the mounts, they needed to be "bent" into place to match the mounts.
I used carriage bolts and just pushed them thru the carpet and made sure they were sucked down far enough into the bunk board as to not scratch the boat. I used lock washers and loctite so they wouldn't loosen (assuming it would be the last time I re-did the bunks). Worked fine for 2 yrs at least with no scratches, then sold the boat.
Made the job much quicker and easier than carpeting the bunks after install and shooting a thousand staples upside down!
Preferred way would still be to keep the bolts under the carpet though.

TxsRiverRat
10-03-2012, 04:22 PM
Sounds about right to me. One thing I would do on the first layer of carpet, is to wrap it far enough on the sides that all the staples were in the side of the bunk, not the top. Then wrap another whole layer of carpet over that.

My carpet covers the part that touches the boat, and wraps underneath, but does not cover the bottom of the board completely. No need it.


After getting the boat off the trailer I used the old bunks to get a layout for the bolts since the new boards wouldn't just lay flat on the mounts, they needed to be "bent" into place to match the mounts.

Yes, the Ďbendí of the wood is the most challenging part of it. I had help, so we layed the board down where we wanted in on the mounts, and used a marker to mark the drill points.

I used carriage bolts and just pushed them thru the carpet and made sure they were sucked down far enough into the bunk board as to not scratch the boat.

Countersinking the holes takes only a few seconds with the drill, totally worth it. :)

I used lock washers and loctite so they wouldn't loosen (assuming it would be the last time I re-did the bunks). Worked fine for 2 yrs at least with no scratches, then sold the boat.

Someone somewhere that owns your old boat has cursed you out a few times for that :D

Made the job much quicker and easier than carpeting the bunks after install and shooting a thousand staples upside down!

it did get tiring doing the upside down staples, but hey, the boat shop will charge u a fortune to do this, so itís worth it!

Thrall
10-03-2012, 05:06 PM
Someone somewhere that owns your old boat has cursed you out a few times for that :D





Not yet, but he probably will in about 5 years!! (Especially if he doesn't own a sawzall)

I agree with everything you've said, definatley the correct way to do it.
I, however brought the bunks along on a camping trip where I knew we could moor the boat and realizing that there would not be a sober moment for 4 days, took the easy way out!

TxsRiverRat
10-03-2012, 05:09 PM
LOL!

Well one things for sure - if you're part of a ski club at a leased site, never I repeat never leave the OLD bunks at the site and expect one of the officers to clean it up for you!!!!!!!

:mad::mad::mad::mad:

east tx skier
10-03-2012, 05:55 PM
I'd suggest using double nuts rather than nylock (in case you were thinking of going that way). Nylock has a tendancy to turn the carriage bolts in their "nests" so to speak. Also, once the boat is back on the trailer, go under there and snug everything up. If there is any twist in your original bunks, attach the rear hardware first and then do the front. A come-along is a handy tool here.

I used my old bunks as templates for the new bunks, predrilled my holes, dropped my hardware in and carpeted before putting it on the trailer. It's a pain doing all that stapling lying on your back.

SeaCup
10-03-2012, 09:31 PM
I will not try to defend the use of a perfectly good lag bolt here but it does the job well and will last years if you pre-drill correctly and don't over torque them. Sure makes it easy if you must do this job at the ramp solo.

Most trailer bunk mounting tabs are drilled out at least two sizes over to account for variances during manufacturing. I have been able to just measure and layout a map on the new boards and have more than enough wiggle room to get a very nice fit. A bit of a gamble if you don't like to measure twice because you will curse more than once if you don't!

The one thing I would recommend is the use of a torque washer when you install your carriage bolts. I buy them at Ace Hardware and if you don't know what they are here is a link. http://www.wclco.com/Lock_Washers/Toothed_Lock_Washers/lw29c.php . Your new carriage bolt will eventually turn in place without them from over tightening, water saturation or most likely when try to remove the bunks in a few years when you do this job again.:toast:

skijwr
10-03-2012, 11:12 PM
I helped a friend swap 2 short bunks last year. He used lag screws from the bottom, with glue. I was thinking there has to be a better way.

What about a T head bolt ? anyone ever tried it ? Drill the through hole, then cut a little seat for the T to sit under the surface. Never tried to buy one.
Thoughts ?

mtajpa
10-04-2012, 12:07 AM
Strad

Look this thread over it might help.
http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=48880&page=2

thatsmrmastercraft
10-04-2012, 12:23 AM
I will not try to defend the use of a perfectly good lag bolt here but it does the job well and will last years if you pre-drill correctly and don't over torque them. Sure makes it easy if you must do this job at the ramp solo.

Most trailer bunk mounting tabs are drilled out at least two sizes over to account for variances during manufacturing. I have been able to just measure and layout a map on the new boards and have more than enough wiggle room to get a very nice fit. A bit of a gamble if you don't like to measure twice because you will curse more than once if you don't!

The one thing I would recommend is the use of a torque washer when you install your carriage bolts. I buy them at Ace Hardware and if you don't know what they are here is a link. http://www.wclco.com/Lock_Washers/Toothed_Lock_Washers/lw29c.php . Your new carriage bolt will eventually turn in place without them from over tightening, water saturation or most likely when try to remove the bunks in a few years when you do this job again.:toast:

Nice job on the torque washer. Never heard of them before. :toast:

jafo9
10-07-2012, 02:09 PM
so the consensus is pressure treated wood? i've heard that the chemicals can seep from the wood into the fiberglass. i have to authority on this matter, i'm just trying to clarify this.