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View Full Version : Winterize for being in garage?


Jason.H.
10-03-2012, 10:25 AM
Hey everyone, I know winterizing has been covered time and time again but I still have a couple questions that I'm unsure of.

I have a 1990 tristar with 351w, I live in north carolina and my boat is kept in an attached garage at my house (don't think it ever even gets below freezing). Last year I drained the engine and all hoses of water and did the normal stuff like fogging with mystery oil and what not. I noticed some rust in the exhaust manifolds last year when draining so this year I think I want to fill engine with rv antifreeze.

When using antifreeze do I run the engine on the hose until hot, cut off engine, put hose into five gallon bucket full of antifreeze, start engine back up and let it run until antifreeze comes out of exhaust? I have read that method but I have also read that other people drain all water then fill the engine and manifolds with the antifreeze. Wont sucking it up front the bucket essentially do the same thing?

Just need some guidance here, thanks -Jason

Miss Rita
10-03-2012, 10:35 AM
Both methods will work equally well. I'm not sure how much antifreeze you need, seems like two gallons would be enough, but considering it's less than $3/gallon, may as well run in some extra just to be sure. You'll be surprised at how fast the engine will suck up two gallons of water, probably will take no more than a minute (or two).

I did the bucket thing a couple of years ago. I ran the garden hose at full throttle (and I have lots of water pressure). With the engine idling, the hose was a little ahead of the engine. At 1000 RPM they were even. At 1200 RPM the hose couldn't keep up, and the bucket was dry.

mikeg205
10-03-2012, 10:37 AM
Rusty water coming out? or at the drain plugs... The manifold water jacket will corrode as well as the risers (on the inside)...some folks inspect older boats annually to confirm water pathways clear..gaskets are cheap.

I am going to store my '95 with RV antifreeze - cuz it has some rust inhibitor. I used to just run the antifreeze thru then dry block over winter.

Draining the engine before hand prevents any dilution of the RV antifreeze. My garage is warm..except when we open the door (leave open) to clear the snow from drive or kid leaves door open when arriving late from a night out.


Actually going to test a product called evaporust on the inside of a riser... www.evaporust.com
neutral ph - different rust removal process. If it works and does not kill my riser - I may run it thru the exhaust manifold. Mine are pretty cruddy and I plan on replacing them soon anyway. I'll document what happens on TT.

bturner2
10-03-2012, 10:44 AM
Everyone has their own preference on this. I personally like seeing all the water out and then fill everything by disconnecting the hoses.

I don't use RV antifreeze in the engine. Once again my opinion and there will be a host of opinions on this. I prefer to use a Marine antifreeze specifically designed for this application that includes an anti-corrosive. The RV stuff is primarily for water systems. One of the problems with using the suck up method is that it can get messy. You have to see the antifreeze coming out of the engine to know if it has completely circulated and once that's happened it's coming out of the exhaust and going on the ground somewhere. While advertised as non toxic I find it hard to believe that it would be a positive thing to have where kids and animals might get into to it. I'm sure others will come along with a completely different thought process on this.

Jason.H.
10-03-2012, 10:47 AM
Just some rust in the riser when I looked in there after taking the hose off. Is dilluting the rv antifreeze a big issue if its not below freezing in my garage? I just want to use the antifreeze for the lubrication like you mentioned. That and I dont have to take any of the block drains or hoses off if I go the antifreeze route. I just feel like going the the whole process of getting all the water out is kind of overkill since I keep the boat in a "warm" garage and the boat is only not used from november to february-march.

mikeg205
10-03-2012, 10:54 AM
All risers get rusty unless of course aluminum...one cold day and you wish that you had drained all the water out.

I read about too many cracked risers and blocks in the spring. If its stored outside I like spinning rv/marine antifreeze thru the water pump...ice crystals have a lot of force...probably over kill but I believe antifreeze in the impeller of circulation pump can't hurt.

Thrall
10-03-2012, 08:15 PM
Just some rust in the riser when I looked in there after taking the hose off. Is dilluting the rv antifreeze a big issue if its not below freezing in my garage? I just want to use the antifreeze for the lubrication like you mentioned. That and I dont have to take any of the block drains or hoses off if I go the antifreeze route. I just feel like going the the whole process of getting all the water out is kind of overkill since I keep the boat in a "warm" garage and the boat is only not used from november to february-march.

If there's truly no chance of freezing then I wouldn't be as concerned with draining the block. It sits for 3-4 months with water in it, no big deal. It sits with water in it the rest of the year too. I don't think old water causes rust any faster than new water! haha
But, I remember a couple years ago, in Texas I think, they got a big freeze where it "never"gets that cold. Lotsa business for the boat repair shops that spring!
Sure your garage never gets below 32deg. What if you went away for the holidays for a week and got a cold snap with the power out?
Diluted antifreeze would be fine I think in your situation.

Tristarboarder
10-03-2012, 10:08 PM
I have a '90 Tristar, and up in Central WA state, it gets cold, some years at or below zero. The way I do it every year seems to work fine. I pull the intake hose off just upstream from the pump, and insert a garden hose. Fire up the engine at idle, then turn the hose on. Let the engine run for about 5 minutes slightly above 1200 rpm just until you get a rise in engine temp. Pull the water hose out, return the engine to idle, and while the engine is still running, I take 5 one gallon jugs of environmentally safe RV anti freeze (pink stuff) and pour it slowly right into the hose just downstream from the pump. After a minute or so, the fluid coming out of the exhaust turns from water to the pink stuff. At this point, the engine is full of anti freeze, and no water. Now you can turn the engine off, take off and drain your hot/cold shower hoses, and perform the rest of the check list items. At this point, the engine is obviously warm, so now I drain the oil and change the filter for Winter. Some may disagree, but this technique is super easy, and doesn't make a mess. Just try to do it where the pink stuff doesn't drain into fresh water or rain gutters....Hope this helps.

Jason.H.
10-04-2012, 09:12 AM
Thank you everyone for your suggestions. I think I will get five gallons of the pink stuff from wally world and just let it get sucked in after the engine has gotten hot, fog it out and call it a deal. It never got below 40 in the garage last year so even with dilluted antifreeze one would think it still works to a temp well below freezing. alcalyn (sp?) glycol, the green antifreeze used in cars gets dilluted 50/50 and is still good to -20 or so.