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RickDV
09-03-2005, 09:48 PM
I was able to replace the starter on my 1990 PS190. I am no mechanic, but all the good advice from you folks gave me the confidence to tackle it myself. Thanks!

I kept the camera handy and took pictures along the way so maybe it will help someone else.

RickDV
09-03-2005, 09:49 PM
Step 1 - locate the starter behind the blower hose on the right side.
Oh yeah - be sure to disconnect the battery before starting so there are no surprises.

RickDV
09-03-2005, 09:51 PM
Step 2 - remove blower hose.

RickDV
09-03-2005, 09:52 PM
Step 3 - remove electrical connection.

RickDV
09-03-2005, 09:53 PM
Step 4 - remove starter (2 bolts)

RickDV
09-03-2005, 09:55 PM
A look at the teeth on the old starter. They don't look too bad. I did notice that the solenoid on the old starter move a lot harder than on the new one.

RickDV
09-03-2005, 09:57 PM
Step 5 - take a look at teeth the on the fly wheel. Did not see any unusual wear.
I was not able to turn the motor manually, so I could not check the rest of the teeth.

RickDV
09-03-2005, 09:59 PM
Someone mentioned a shim on my starter. I am not sure if this is the shim that he was talking about.

RickDV
09-03-2005, 10:00 PM
Step 6 - install new starter.

RickDV
09-03-2005, 10:01 PM
Step 7 - reconnect the electrical connection.

RickDV
09-03-2005, 10:02 PM
Step 8 - replace the blower hose. Reconnect the battery. Done!

BriEOD
09-03-2005, 10:21 PM
That rear bolt on the starter is always fun to get at it. I have to use like 4 6" extensions to get it out.

pup
09-03-2005, 10:31 PM
It's a good feeling to repair your own boat & have the job go smoothly.
From a safety standpoint, you should always dissconnect the battery negative cable before performing electrical repairs or any repairs where spinning parts could mess you up.

bigmac
09-03-2005, 11:13 PM
I was able to replace the starter on my 1990 PS190. I am no mechanic, but all the good advice from you folks gave me the confidence to tackle it myself. Thanks!

I kept the camera handy and took pictures along the way so maybe it will help someone else.

Nice shots! I agree the teeth all look to be in good shape - likely the solenoid not fully engaging.

You forgot to mention the most important part -- did it fix the problem?

shepherd
09-04-2005, 12:07 AM
See, I told you it was easy! I just replaced the starter on the port engine on my other boat. It's located in basically the same spot on the engine as your starter, but it can't be seen because the other engine is in the way. Had to do the job entirely by feel and I could barely reach the underneath mounting bolt with the tip of my finger. I love this shizz.

OK, enough bragging. :o Good job Rick. I love to see pictures of the work people here do to their boats. :)

erkoehler
09-04-2005, 12:26 AM
See, I told you it was easy! I just replaced the starter on the port engine on my other boat. It's located in basically the same spot on the engine as your starter, but it can't be seen because the other engine is in the way. Had to do the job entirely by feel and I could barely reach the underneath mounting bolt with the tip of my finger. I love this shizz.

OK, enough bragging. :o Good job Rick. I love to see pictures of the work people here do to their boats. :)


That looks like oh so much fun!!!!


So, how much did the entire switch cost on the MC?

RickDV
09-04-2005, 02:00 PM
You forgot to mention the most important part -- did it fix the problem?

It partially fixed the problem. The grinding sound is no longer there, but the engine still cranks longer than I think it should before catching. I have to crank it for about 5 seconds every time, even when it is warmed up. Any suggestions on that would be appreciated.

Cost-wise: I spent about $65 on the starter and less than an hour of my time, not counting time for the parts run.

redmike
09-04-2005, 02:04 PM
if it is cranking a long time, you might want to check the timing with a timing light, if it too retarded, it will turn over fast, but not start right away. not sure what it should be on a 90, but my 88 wants 10 degrees of timing to run/start easy!

bigmac
09-04-2005, 02:12 PM
It partially fixed the problem. The grinding sound is no longer there, but the engine still cranks longer than I think it should before catching. I have to crank it for about 5 seconds every time, even when it is warmed up. Any suggestions on that would be appreciated.

Cost-wise: I spent about $65 on the starter and less than an hour of my time, not counting time for the parts run.

Cool. Nice work.

The extra cranking isn't a function of the starter. Could be anything else, though...fuel, spark, timing are the most likely culprits. The timing should be easy to check and adjust.

H20skeefreek
09-04-2005, 03:56 PM
if it is cranking a long time, you might want to check the timing with a timing light, if it too retarded, it will turn over fast, but not start right away. not sure what it should be on a 90, but my 88 wants 10 degrees of timing to run/start easy!
that's what I was going to say, check the timing. I have to wonder, for $65 is it a marine starter?? This is VERY important, unless you hate your family/friends/self.

6ballsisall
09-04-2005, 04:40 PM
Good instructional thread! $65???? Where did you find a marine starter for that price!! :eek: Thats a steal of a deal!

It's been said above but the extra cranking time I'd take a look at timing first then fuel. Start with timing the motor and it that all checks out test your fuel pump and see how strong it is. If its good go for the carb