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Matt7246
09-08-2012, 02:11 PM
I have a 1997 Mastercraft Maristar 200v and i feel like the front of the boat is very close to the water and when i'm driving fast and slow down really fast put just going from 3/4 throttle to neutral the front of the boat dips in the water and literally comes within inches of the water flowing over and in the boat...

Is this normal or is something wrong with my boat?

mikeg205
09-08-2012, 02:17 PM
normal..mine does the same thing...if you notice when the wake comes up to your transom the stern of your boat raises up...as long as this does not happen your ok...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=68AOltMu768

Traxx822
09-08-2012, 02:26 PM
I have the same boat. If you are on plane and just throw it in neutral when you come to a stop the wake will catch up and dip your nose forward. So pull back to 1200 or 1000 rpms and hold it until the wake settles. Otherwise your bow comes within a half inch with any weight in it. And keep under power if piercing through some fat waves or it'll be a tidal wave in your boat. Trust me ;)

Also look at your boat on a trailer on level ground. You will notice the bow dips down pretty far on its own. I'm guessing to add room to the bow.

CC2MC
09-08-2012, 02:31 PM
I know i have the older model but I haven't noticed mine getting that close to the water when decelerating. I will have to notice next time I am out there.

I remember seeing that video the first time when I worked for CC. Craziness!

Miss Rita
09-08-2012, 07:34 PM
Another way to prevent the bow from dipping too low is to pull the throttle lever back all the way to neutral. That way the prop freewheels, doesn't slow the boat as much as it does when you leave it in gear.

Matt7246
09-10-2012, 01:24 PM
Thanks guys i appreciate all your input i feel so much better now cause i thought something was wrong with my boat...

Another thing is i'm still having a ton of trouble controling the boat at low speeds like when docking or pulling up to another boat. I feel like i have no control of it unless it's ion gear. Any suggestions?

Miss Rita
09-10-2012, 01:30 PM
You can only steer going forward when it's in gear and the rudder is directing the prop thrust. In reverse, well, you can't steer. Such is the price we pay for owning direct drive boats.

mzimme
09-10-2012, 02:09 PM
Thanks guys i appreciate all your input i feel so much better now cause i thought something was wrong with my boat...

Another thing is i'm still having a ton of trouble controling the boat at low speeds like when docking or pulling up to another boat. I feel like i have no control of it unless it's ion gear. Any suggestions?

Learn to bump the throttle in and out of gear really fast to keep control, but also keep speeds down. Direct Drive's just take practice.

mcparadise
09-10-2012, 02:54 PM
Learn to bump the throttle in and out of gear really fast to keep control, but also keep speeds down. Direct Drive's just take practice.

When I switched from a 3- to 4-blade prop I got much more control for close manuvering, not to mention marked improvement in getting out of the hole, and without much loss of top-end speed.

A good understanding of the effect of left-hand rotation (you probably have (?)) on direct drive boat handling (google) will also help. After your research on this, practice the move and you will soon look like a pro.

Matt7246
09-10-2012, 03:10 PM
It's so bad because when i approach the dock and god forbid revers doesn't work i'm gonna ram right up on it but if i don't keep it in ger then bam no control at all... as soon as i take it out of gear it starts to hook left too. when u say go in and out of gear fast do u have to turn the wheel because i feel like if i were to do that i would have to keep it from going left and right maybe?

mzimme
09-10-2012, 03:18 PM
steer normally, while bumping the throttle into forward idle, then back to neutral, then forward idle, then back to neutral. This is to keep your speed down. You only have control of a direct drive boat when the propeller is pushing water across the rudder. When you go into neutral and just try to steer with the rudder, it has no control. That water passing from the prop is what steers you. This is also the reason you have almost no control in reverse... no water passes over the rudder. You probably have noticed that when you go in reverse, you boat steers automatically to the drivers (starboard) side. This is due to the rotation of the prop.

What I like to do is come up to a dock going forward at a 35-45* angle bumping the throttle in and out of gear to keep my speeds down. When I get a couple feet from hitting the nose on the dock, I'll give it a quick hit into reverse to slow it down. Once its slowed down, I'll leave it in reverse, and the prop rotation will make the boat parallell with the dock. If you're not lined up correctly, a couple quick bumps forward, and more reverse will straighten you out with practice. People to help you out with grabbing the dock while you're learning will be necessary, but just keep practicing.

It's hard to explain how it works without actually showing people the dynamics of steering a direct drive boat, but that's about the best i can do with words.

Traxx822
09-10-2012, 03:43 PM
I either nose in under power. more power than nuetral or you start to swing off course at an angle and then a quick kinda hard reverse slows it to a nice crest up against the dock.

Or if I have more room like a straight pier not one like a parking spot I will usually just come close to it, a little past it and just back up. I mean get parallel sort of close maybe a few feet and just cut the rudder towards the dock and back up. hit it forward for a quick jaunt however many times you need if your backing up goes past the point you want to dock at and just slowly pull over.

That was a rambling mess. I hope it helped.

Matt7246
09-10-2012, 04:13 PM
Are all mastercrafts this difficult to drive... even the new ones?

Miss Rita
09-10-2012, 04:28 PM
ALL direct drive boats are this difficult to drive, not just MC's. Just takes practice.

jgraham37128
09-10-2012, 04:35 PM
Two things you need to know about driving a MasterCraft.

1. Never approach a dock or another boat any faster than your willing to hit it. If you come in and you think wow if I hit that dock right now it would break something. Then you know your too fast.

2. The boat always pull one way while in reverse. My new X2 pulls to the right and I think most others do too. So keep this in mind when pulling up beside someone. When you click it in reverse it will pull towards the driver side. I did an 180 (turned the boat completely around)yesterday between two boat docks. I bet I didn't move forwards or backwards one ft while doing it, but I had to be turning it to the left to do it. There's no way you could do this when turning to the right since the boat pulls to the drivers side when in reverse. Once you understand how it works it's simple.

PS. Another helpful hint is when loading a boat I believe the easiest way is to come into it slow and in neutral, once your 3-5 ft from the trailer you should be in gear going onto the trailer. If you find yourself always in neutral when you first go into the trailer try going slower at first then power it onto the trailer. No full throttle just engage it but it will be under power and the bunks will stop it.

ahhudgins
09-10-2012, 04:43 PM
ALL direct drive boats are this difficult to drive, not just MC's. Just takes practice.

There you go. Everything is hard until you learn how to do it.:D

My wife still won't dock or load the boat after 24 years of marriage. Both of my sons have been doing it for years. You just have to remember that it's like driving a fork truck, the back end turns when you steer.

thatsmrmastercraft
09-10-2012, 04:46 PM
There is a learning curve in maneuvering and direct drive boat. It should be the first thing you master. Time at the helm is the only answer to becoming a confident and qualified driver. Practice maneuvering starting in open water. Once you start to become proficient, throw a boat cushion in the water and work around that. You should be very capable of maneuvering you boat in close quarters before pulling anyone behind your boat in the off chance that you need to quickly pick up an injured skier and dock the boat quickly for medical attention.

Find someone who is a skilled ski boat driver and have only that person with you in the boat initially while you practice. It won't take long to become proficient. Good luck.

Matt7246
09-12-2012, 09:52 PM
Yeh i guess i'll just have to take the time and practice and eventually i will learn the boat like you all say...

Another thing is that i actually pulled the boat out of the water and i want to buff and wax it... Anyone have any recommendations on buffing pads because i have some pretty big rubber marks on the boat and would really like to buff them out and then buff the whole boat and then finally wax it

Jeffer
09-13-2012, 11:09 AM
Many, many, MANY posts on cleaning buffing, and waxing. Including best recommendations for tools. You definitely will not be at a loss for info if you search that topic...

homer12
09-13-2012, 11:38 AM
Another thing is that I find with extreme turns of the wheel I can steer in neutral if the boat is still coasting. I can also get it to go straight in reverse if I keep the rudder all the way left and bump into and out of reverse and keep it real slow, only really need to do that at the ramp when it's really tight. The dock approach that mzimme said is spot on with why I do as well.

Matt7246
09-13-2012, 02:33 PM
How do i look up topics for buffing on here?

FrankSchwab
09-13-2012, 02:44 PM
Well, you could search on "buffing". From reading here a lot, I'd suggest you search for "circular buffer". This (http://mastercraft.com/teamtalk/showthread.php?t=45534&highlight=circular)link could be handy.

mcparadise
09-13-2012, 06:33 PM
Yeh i guess i'll just have to take the time and practice and eventually i will learn the boat like you all say...

Another thing is that i actually pulled the boat out of the water and i want to buff and wax it... Anyone have any recommendations on buffing pads because i have some pretty big rubber marks on the boat and would really like to buff them out and then buff the whole boat and then finally wax it

I read Boating World, something like $6 for a 3-year subscription (on line too). It's cheap and you can't help but learn new stuff to help you for the future. When I first signed up they sent me a cool boater's manual and it had excellent info on boat handling. I even took the manual and practiced the things it describes in Tokyo Bay ;-) practice is always the key to doing things we want to be better at.

Anyway, the Sept/Oct issue has a nice article where they tested several essential cleaning products, including gel coat polishing/waxing stuff, and they did it on red color, sweet since that's the color of my MC stripe!