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flyinryn
09-02-2005, 12:56 PM
Okay

Need some help?

Friend of mine just moved to boulder Co. from the good old state of Cali. He is now worried about the storage and winterization for the up and coming winter.

I was hoping some of you CO. Boys could help me out with what you guys are doing for the colder months.

He was also saying something about climate-controlled storage out there or something to that effect. Anybody know anything about this or a place that they may call.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.

VTJC
09-02-2005, 01:05 PM
You will want to winterize the boat for the winter, fog cylinders, change oil, replace fresh water with anti-freeze… I am sure if you search you can find threads with steps. Even if you have climate controlled(heated) storage, I would still winterize in case of power outage… Also since it will not be used for a few months the winterization process is good opportunity for regular maintenance. I have always winterized my boats my self.

Jamie

mcprostar197
09-02-2005, 01:11 PM
Considering that he is going to be living on the front range, it isn't THAT cold all winter. There will be days in the winter where it reaches almost 60 degrees. That being said, he still needs to winterize and stuff. SW Performance Marine is the dealership in Denver.

bigmac
09-02-2005, 01:17 PM
Okay

Need some help?

Friend of mine just moved to boulder Co. from the good old state of Cali. He is now worried about the storage and winterization for the up and coming winter.

I was hoping some of you CO. Boys could help me out with what you guys are doing for the colder months.

He was also saying something about climate-controlled storage out there or something to that effect. Anybody know anything about this or a place that they may call.

Any help would be greatly appreciated.Climate controlled storage is nice, but the boat still needs the winterization ritual. This includes draining the block and exhaust, or pumping RV antifreeze through the boat via the intake hose. This method of winterization (antifreeze instead of draining) is an acceptable alternative, apparently, according to my MasterCraft dealer. Battery needs a battery maintainer, boat covered and a heater or dehumidifier inside, dryer sheets scattered around to keep the mice out. Fuel separator, full fuel tank with stabilizer, change the oil and filter.

wiltok
09-02-2005, 01:34 PM
To each his own - but I prefer to have the dealer assume the liabiltiy for a bad winterize ($200 vs. $6,000 for a new engine). I did it myself once - it wasn't worth the sleepless nights in the spring worried that I didn't do it correctly and cracked the block. In the end it was fine - but I vowed to never do it myself again.

skisix@38
09-02-2005, 01:41 PM
I've had to go through this every year for the last 13 that I've had a boat. No doubt to winterizing, the details are how much? I've stored my boats in my garage so, I drain the block and manifolds, pull the impeller and disconnect the battery. Then I put the cover on it and wait for warmer weather. If it's outside, then you might want to pull the battery and suck antifreeze throught the intake.

shepherd
09-02-2005, 03:54 PM
Make sure when you drain the water to take a small nail or something to poke up into the drain hole to make sure it's not clogged up and that the water drains freely out. I failed to do that years ago on an I/O Stingray I had and, sho nuff, had to replace an exhaust manifold the next spring. At least it wasn't my block!

AirJunky
09-02-2005, 04:25 PM
Depends on how much you want to winterize it. If your not going to use it at all, then go all out. Clear all the water from the engine, exhaust, heater & shower, fill it with antifreeze, fog the cylinders, pour Stabil in the gas tank, cover it with a good Sunbrella cover & put several Dry-Z-Air containers in it (or it'll mold & mildew inside).
I'm an hour from Canada & we'll see days in the 50s & 60s so we like to get out & ride once a month or so during the winter. So I drain the engine, exhaust & heater, bump start the engine to blow out the mufflers, put a shoplight in the engine compartment with the engine cover up a few inches, 3 Dry-Z-Air containers & a West Marine dehumidifier, Sunbrella cover & park it under a carport. Piece of cake.... takes me less than 10 minutes & I'll probably do it 8 or 10 times this year, just like I've done the last 5 years.