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Cloaked
08-30-2005, 09:55 PM
This issue started back in early summer. I knew the platform on the current 1985 Skier 19 model was weak where it connected to the transom but I kind of ignored it until another time. Well, a few weeks ago I plopped my big ol’ butt down on the platform where it was handy on which to plop while working in the garage. Upon the plop, I felt the lag screws pull loose. No surprise at all. Upon my quest to determine a method of repair (reading here), I called a friend at a body shop to look for some type of filler material for the holes. He bailed immediately… LOL… As the return of a favor, he referred me to a friend of his that so happened to work at Malibu as their fiberglass guru. He lives about 10 miles from my house. “Perfect,” I thought. So with the following, I’ll make a few points, share a bit of knowledge and experience of others, and opinions of my experience with this particular issue.

I pulled the boat over to his place. I got to talking to the guy and he turns out to be a valued resource by several dealers (locally and state wide), Malibu Boat Co, and individuals that rely on him to do repair and restoration work.

After he assesses the damage he recommended going into the flooring to get to the bracket from the inside in order to place a metal backing plate, thru-blots, and then glass it all in from the inside, in order to do the repair satisfactorily to him.

So be it.

He started cutting on the floor to cut out a hand hole for access. After he cut out a good sized section I could see what lie ahead. With regards to several posts here on the board, here is what I found out first hand about the transoms and them being wood or glass. Viewing the first picture, you’ll see the transom area from the inside (after the foam and a section of the baffle was removed) where the brackets attach to the transom (on the outside). There is a wooden frame of reinforcement glassed in around that area (on the inside) to (evidently) provide that area with strength for the platform’s use. The lag screws thread into that wooden area which is no more than 5/8” – 3/4” thick. Not very much at all for the screws to get a good bite. The screws do not extend into the boat’s structure in any other manner, as I initially envisioned. Other than the wooden framed reinforcement, there’s nothing behind the transom to which the lag screws can attach. I was somewhat surprised indeed of the lesser than anticipated structural integrity for such a useful component of the boat. Outside of the reinforced area, the transom is fiberglass with gel reinforcement on the inside. No wood that I could tell other than the described areas. These screws do not attach into any type of (perpendicular to the transom) floor stringer at all.

The diagnosis so far is that we’ll use a backing plate and thru-bolts. The repair will also consist of removing a portion of the gel coat and painted area on the outside due to it spalling in the immediate area of the bracket, from the detachment of the platform. It had obviously been there a long time (probably since new). So this has turned into a somewhat major project (in my relative opinion) but the guy doing the work says it’s a small job for him.

Upon completion of the repair, he is going to have to repaint the repaired area, re-gel it and buff it out. But again, his experience allows him to do that as a small job. I’d have never attempted this myself. But then again, once the gel coat spalled, I would have had to seek professional assistance anyway. So as luck and good clean living has it, I made the right decision after all. :D :D

In the event of hurricane Katrina, we stopped work for a few days so that I could take the boat home and dry store it until a nicer weather day (he works in an unprotected area at his house). So hopefully I can continue to monitor the project or rely on him to take some further pictures (as he said so) to show some more of the process he’ll follow to get this done.

Now, with all of this being said, I called West System Epoxy yesterday to see about a kit for a jet ski I am working on (another one of many projects I have going). I talked to a Tech Rep and he went on to tell me this (in the event that anyone here feels otherwise about cutting into their boat).

He suggested this as a viable option and basically said that anything less would be a waste of time.

For epoxy filler use:
Drill the holes about 1/8” oversize (but I m skeptical of the drilling after I saw the spalled areas on my outside finish from the bracket removal).

Use an epoxy / resin hardener in a manner of a high slump consistency (thin consistency) and coat the inside of the screw hole(s) with this consistency of mixture (to seal the inside diameter area of the hole(s)). Then before that begins to cure, add additional 404 filler (apparently their product reference number) to reduce the slump consistency (thicken the mixture) and fill the hole(s) with this thicker add mixture consistency, as full as possible. Spray the lag screws with Pam cooking spray which will act as a barrier for the filler mixture in which not to adhere to the screws. This will allow the removal of the screws in a future step. In addition brush on the 404 mixture onto the screw threads, insert the screw into the holes and allow this to cure at least 12 hours. After the proper curing time, the screws will be able to be removed, leaving an epoxy-molded insert for reattachment of the platform to the boat. Upon removal of the embedded screws, if the screws exhibit a cracking sound or chip a bit of epoxy out while removing; simply brush on a bit more epoxy filler material upon entry placement of the screws when attaching the platform. This will fill in any cracked areas or chipped places inside of the epoxy-molded insert. Done deal.

Needless to say, use a silicone sealer as well on each bolted connection point to seal out any water.

Had I have seriously considered my options with the hind sight I have now (and foresight of completion) of the surgical procedure on my hull, I’d likely have tried this epoxy filler method first.


In addition he buffed out an area on the transom to show me how nicely the oxidized gel coat will buff out. I was glad to see that, in regards to having to repaint it all together. This guy also paints boats for repair and restoration. I saw an album of pics of past work and he has done some really nice looking boats and jet skis as well as the jet skiers’ race helmets.

Like I said, I’ll post more pics as the work progresses if I am around the boat or if he takes pics as such.

In conclusion of this lengthy blurb, I have covered two options of repair for those that may have this problem, in particular with the older boats. In addition, I got some insight as to the material that Malibu uses for flooring in their boats (which the hole the guy cut will be repaired with such material). It is a recycled product of a water proof material with great strength. I’ll post up a pic of that too. He tells me now that he has custom cut and covered this type of material for replacement platforms and that it works most excellent. No maintenance of teak wood or fiberglass platforms. This is a solid core composite material.

I was impressed… LOL... But that doesn’t take much either…: D

.

seaforth
08-30-2005, 10:21 PM
Sporty,

I followed this with great interest as, as you may know I have the same issue. So in the end would you reco the west system.

By the way, wow what a great sheen on the transom

dog paw
08-30-2005, 10:37 PM
Yes! thanks for sharing that I have a 84 that I think is going to need that repair before too long It's nice to see some pics. I think I would go for the more labor intensive plating the back of the transom. Seems like a stronger more reliable repair

BriEOD
08-30-2005, 10:40 PM
Thanks for the insight. BTW, what did he use to buff out your gel coat?

Cloaked
08-30-2005, 11:37 PM
He used some buffing liquid he gets at his work. It did shine up quite nicely, as I had no idea what condition the existing oxidation was in. I'll find out tomorrow when I talk to him.

I will indeed try to post with pics and details as we progress. After hurricane Katrina clears out, I'll have the boat back to his place for completion.

It is a much better recommendation to cut and use the backing plate without a doubt but man am I glad this guy is doing this particular job due to the spalling on the outside. Otherwise, it would be a piece of cake. He uses air driven Dremel type tools to do all of his cutting.

West System Epoxy seems to be a reputable place. I had a well versed Tech Rep, the staff was nice in getting him on the phone and an overall good experience with them. That means a lot to me. And from their site, their product seems to be satisfactory. The Tech knew exactly what he was talking about with no guess work. He was on it like white on rice. :D

wesgardner
08-31-2005, 09:15 AM
I did the epoxy repair to my transom, my boat's a bit different as stainless hand rails support the outer edge, the brackets are just small aluminum angles turned up so they're mostly invisible. You can get the complete epoxy system from West Marine (W.E.S.T System 0 Wood Epoxy Saturation Treatment) or larger (and cheaper) quantities from RAKA Epoxy (I used GALLONS building my last 18' sailboat and not a metal fastener in 'er) along with a full array of thickening agents - yes, the folks at WEST System are knowledgable - they (the Gougeon Brothers) pioneered wood/epoxy boatbuilding in the '60's and have done extensive testing on various composites. Make sure you de-grease any area with acetone when attempting epoxy repairs.

H20skeefreek
08-31-2005, 10:16 AM
I did the epoxy repair to my transom, my boat's a bit different as stainless hand rails support the outer edge, the brackets are just small aluminum angles turned up so they're mostly invisible. You can get the complete epoxy system from West Marine (W.E.S.T System 0 Wood Epoxy Saturation Treatment) or larger (and cheaper) quantities from RAKA Epoxy (I used GALLONS building my last 18' sailboat and not a metal fastener in 'er) along with a full array of thickening agents - yes, the folks at WEST System are knowledgable - they (the Gougeon Brothers) pioneered wood/epoxy boatbuilding in the '60's and have done extensive testing on various composites. Make sure you de-grease any area with acetone when attempting epoxy repairs.
great looking boat wes. I want a 240SC for going out on the big water someday. When I was shopping for my current boat, I almost bought the 1990 Maristar 210, but wanted a more slalom specific boat.

Cloaked
09-06-2005, 10:40 PM
This guy is slow as Christmas (to a 6 year old) working on my boat. I’m about ready to finish it myself, but it’s also about done. So much for the expedient repair. Nonetheless, here are a few more pics of the repair. In the first pic, you’ll see the area he ground out all the way to solid material. The fiberglass had gotten wet in one place and had to be ground out, then reinforced with glass (in lieu of a filler compound, which is a common shortcut but much less strength-reinforced for a repair). In the second pic you’ll see where he ground out the hull on the inside in order to get a flat surface and a good fit for the backing plate. In the third pic you’ll see the glass patch for the repair.

At this time, the plan is to re-glass the cut out area, put in a backing plate (tacking the nuts to the plate), paint the repair area, reattach the platform, test for water intrusion (hopefully none), cover the cutout inside on the floor with a gel coating (rough finish), remount the tank, clean the boat (from a lot of fiber dust from cutting the floor out) and get it ready for this weekend. What I really anticipate is him still mucking around with it this time next week. Oh how my patience has been tried with this guy, but he is doing it right. I don’t see how he gets out 8 boats per week but they like his work and I am really glad to have his services available even though somewhat slow. :D :D

Cloaked
09-11-2005, 07:18 PM
Boat guy finished his job yesterday. Here's the final phase of the project.

Fisrt pic is the finished gel and paint taken in sunny natural light to show the slight mismatch in color but to see it in person, it's not an issue with me. Platform covers most of it and I was ready to get this done. It would have been another week waiting on Spectrum's delivery and his dilly-dally time.

Second pic is the final base of wood and glass.

Third pic is the reinforcement plate and thru-bolts.

Fourth pic is the cover back on the floor.

I am satisfied with the project. He did a good job all-in-all. I am looking forward to buffing the boat this winter. It will buff out nicely.

.

Cloaked
09-11-2005, 07:25 PM
Platform is back on and the boat is ready for the inaugural Mag Mania. :dance:

erkoehler
09-11-2005, 08:51 PM
Glad to hear you got everything all taken care of. The repair looks awesome, and the color mismatch isn't really that bad.

BriEOD
09-12-2005, 08:52 AM
Great job Sporty. I bet you could put a couple of fat chicks on their now with no problem!! ;)

peason
09-12-2005, 09:52 AM
Very nice sporty - sounds like Bri has some is coming down with some fat chicks to check it out.

73SS
09-30-2005, 12:50 PM
Thanks for sharing - Boat looks great!

LGP
05-20-2013, 12:41 PM
Thank you for providing this.. appreciated
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