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View Full Version : Pounding posts for boathouse


liledgy
07-30-2012, 09:27 PM
Im thinking of possibly building a boathouse (nothing fancy) and was wondering if a 90lb. jackhammer would pound the wood poles or 6x6's? Its a soft clay bottom. I have access to a Lull,( it can extend out about 30') to either hold the poles or hold the jackhammer from a chain. I would need to weld a bit to go over the top of the poles to pound them. I have seen a company pound the metal corrugated seawall pieces with a jack hammer.

kyfooter
07-30-2012, 09:44 PM
Just completed my dock. We have 76 poles driven into the lake bottom holding our dock up, which is 38' wide and 34' out into the water. Two slip dock with a 10' swim area, 10' slips, and 4' walkways in between the slips and on one end.

The metal pipes seem to last around 25-35 years on my lake. I prefer metal pipes over 6x6 posts, if the lake bottom is solid enough (clay and rock). The down side is drilling through the pipe to bolt the ledger boards...I drilled over 600 holes in my pipes and wold have welcomed drilling through wood.

We used an 85lb. Manual pole driver as well as the Rhino 55lb. Air Driver that can be rented from your local tool rental place. The rhino worked fine to get the pipes started, but we also used the manual driver on every pipe. Our experience has been that while air drivers are helpful, you'll still need more. You need (IMO) the 18"+ drop of the manual driver to drive the pipe through tough spots. The air hammers just don't do enough (regardless of what they advertise).

76S&S
07-31-2012, 09:56 AM
I saw a company using a jackhammer to drive 6x6's on our lake. They had a metal cap that they put over the post before driving.

Note: The pressure treated lumber at our local lumber yards states on the tag that it is NOT for ground contact use. I got with my local yard and ordered a higher pressure treatment and there is even a marine treatment that is for use in salt water. I would not go with the stuff that is readily available.

east tx skier
07-31-2012, 10:15 AM
A long piece of pipe with a high pressure spray nozzle on the end can come in very handy. Shove it down under your post while you pound it in and it will help clear out the lake bed for your post.

76S&S
07-31-2012, 10:20 AM
A long piece of pipe with a high pressure spray nozzle on the end can come in very handy. Shove it down under your post while you pound it in and it will help clear out the lake bed for your post.

This is all that you need for a sand bottom.

Note to self: Retire to lake with a sand bottom.:D

onebadrubi
07-31-2012, 07:02 PM
http://www.rhinotool.com/

I actually am a rep for these guys (among many other companies), and we sell these to a large portion of boat dock installers. You really want one bigger than the pd55 if you are going to do 6x6 square posts, maybe a 110.

Many of your RSC's (now United Rentals) will have these in there fleets. Along with other rental stores.

east tx skier
08-01-2012, 12:09 AM
This is all that you need for a sand bottom.

Note to self: Retire to lake with a sand bottom.:D

I'm told we have a fair amount of clay here in east Texas. :) That and cypress tree roots make for a rough dig.

kyfooter
08-02-2012, 06:10 PM
http://www.rhinotool.com/

I actually am a rep for these guys (among many other companies), and we sell these to a large portion of boat dock installers. You really want one bigger than the pd55 if you are going to do 6x6 square posts, maybe a 110.

Many of your RSC's (now United Rentals) will have these in there fleets. Along with other rental stores.

I wish I knew you were a rep. The PD 55 was definitely not enough for my job. When I called the rep for my area, I asked about the PD 110 and he said it's not rented anywhere. I also checked my local and national rental chains and they didn't rent it, confirming what I was told.

I wish there was an easier way, but with a rock and clay lake bottom, get some good help and a manual driver.